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familial adamatous polyposis colorectoral cancer vlc

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 12, 2011 at 11:16 PM

i believe i am genetically predisposed to the above diseases given family history. i have recently read that a high fat low carb diet invreases risk given slower transit time of feces in the intestinek. correct? what can be done to combat it?

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 16, 2012
at 11:07 PM

Alexandra, thanks for posting this. Dr. Donaldson's book, Strong Medicine, is now online: http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015003228171

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on October 13, 2011
at 06:58 PM

There's a big difference between a "high" fat, low fibre diet, which usually means moderate fat, high carb, low fibre; and a HFLC diet which is much higher in fat and ketogenic.

10dd073d45b65f00ad31149959d08b8e

(114)

on October 13, 2011
at 06:35 AM

i had read there is a correlation between high fat low fibre diets and colorectoral cancer from a lippincot wlliams and wilkins test for licensed practical nurses. it claimed the transit time of digestion was slower with the above diet and this predisposed people to these diseases through sepsis or some such...i'fishing for opinions and arguments pro and con.

Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on October 12, 2011
at 11:18 PM

Can you disclose where you heard this? In other words, what are your sources for this notion? Not saying one way or the other. Just trying to get clarification.

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6 Answers

3
Bebca5be026bf2633648452db9641859

(225)

on October 13, 2011
at 12:12 PM

As a genetic counselor I can tell you that IF you have inherited the gene change for FAP no diet will change your risk for colon cancer (which is virtually 100% in untreated patients) because you are lacking a tumor suppressor gene. I am a big believer in paleo but there are certain things food can't change and genetic conditions are one of them. There are treatments and management protocols to significantly reduce your risk of cancer if you have FAP so I highly suggest you get yourself to a genetic counselor or geneticist to discuss your options.

2
D7ec5ab98a0b971f9e24b4e654abfa7d

on October 13, 2011
at 03:12 PM

If you are concerned about hereditary cancer, you really need to see a genetic counselor -- here's a link to help you find one. I have a BRCA2 mutation (hereditary breast/ovarian cancer syndrome gene) and am an oncology nurse -- seriously, diet is not a sufficient intervention for a cancer-predisposing mutation. You need to know (a) if you actually have an identifiable mutation and (b) what your risk-reduction options are.

2
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on October 13, 2011
at 01:48 PM

I don't know about the big picture but at the cellular level cancer cells need glucose to survive and multiply. Carbs are converted into glucose. It would appear a low carb diet would reduce your risk of cancer.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-08-stanford-potential-anti-cancer-therapy-starves.html

1
1145a340276b66b7765d7808128062ea

(80)

on November 21, 2011
at 02:05 PM

FAP relies on a strict definition of actually seeing polyps within your colon.

If you really have FAP, you need your colon removed. The typical protocol is for FAP patients to have their colon removed early in life to avoid getting cancer.

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/fpc.htm

I would strongly suggest you see a physician to get both genetically tested and have your colon scoped to check for polyps. 100% percent of these patient get cancer in their colon, so please check this out.

1
27361737e33ba2f73ab3c25d2699ad61

(1880)

on October 13, 2011
at 09:16 PM

Thanks for that link Brad. Interesting info but a tad worrisome. I say worrisome because no way do I tolerate the amount of "safe starches" recommended by Jaminet although I do enjoy his work very much and there is much in his excellent book for those of us interested in autophagy and ketogenic diets - plus other helpful info. Back to the link -- when the long-term Optimal dieter (referring to Kwasniewski diet) referenced who stated that there was a feeling that long-term Optimal dieters were succumbing to colon, stomach and duodenol cancers at frequent rates -- does anyone have any actual numbers? Also, these long-term dieters were purportedly on the diet for over a decade so I can't help but wonder if cause and effect with respect to diet isn't a stretch without knowing other factors such as genetic susceptibility; actual diet compliance; amount of smoked and non-organic foods eaten; H-Pylori infection; vitamin d status; alcohol consumption; smoking habits, etc etc etc. I would think very low carb advocating physicians would have noticed if their patients were developing the above cancers at alarming rates. Certainly deceased low carb advocating physicians such as Wolfgang Lutz, H.L Newbold and Blake Donaldson did not mention this in their books. Lutz was a gastroenerologist and Life Without Bread translation advocates starting at around 72 carbs but these can be gradually lowered as desired -- the higher amount is to avoid undue stress reactions -- no mention made of dangers from mucus deficiency when going lower. As someone with a hypothyroid condition, I find it interesting that more mucin is somehow desirable in the colon when excess mucin is a hallmark of untreated hypothyroidism -- puffy looking, thickened skin.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 16, 2012
at 11:07 PM

Alexandra, thanks for posting this. Dr. Donaldson's book, Strong Medicine, is now online: http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015003228171

1
Aebee51dc2b93b209980a89fa4a70c1e

(1982)

on October 13, 2011
at 04:40 PM

You might want to read this.

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