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Anti-Cancer Diet?

Commented on September 28, 2013
Created September 26, 2013 at 3:09 PM

Here's the short story:

My girlfriend has recently developed a significant lump in her breast. Worse - it seems to be growing (though that may be due to the time of the month). I'm not crazy though; I told her to see the doctor as soon as we found it. She took too long to make the apt. so I just made one for her but it's been almost a month and it's growing. I'm doing my own research but need help!

I keep reading about this and that having powerful anti-cancer effects. We don't even know yet if it is cancer, but there's a pretty good chance it is. If some genius can lay out the perfect anti-cancer diet we'd be forever grateful. However, what I'm really hoping for are tips and links to help me figure out what's the best diet and supplement regimen to ensure that the tumor is stopped in its tracks, especially in the case it turns out to be breast cancer.

I'm really in love with this girl - we're practically husband and wife. I can't stand the thought of her being sick and in chemo all the time! Please help!

TYIA - Jacob

Be803dcde63e3cf5e21cc121097b8158

(529)

on September 28, 2013
at 01:57 AM

I looked into this claim, but unfortunately I don't see it strongly supported by the research. But maybe the science just isn't there yet?

Treating astrocytoma (mostly in mice) has shown a lot of promise, but the same kind of results haven't materialized when treating other types of tumors. In fact, Paul Jaminet has written about the link between gastrointestinal cancer and VLC diets.

On the other hand, the work of Thomas Seyfried in Cancer as a Metabolic Disease is pretty exciting to contemplate.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 27, 2013
at 10:00 PM

Well, we have Kaiser so... the answer is a big "maybe" The real question is whether we could get 'hold of anyone of consequence in the first place. Her appointment is this Tuesday the 1st and all they will do is check it out. I don't know just how urgent it is!?!?!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 27, 2013
at 12:44 PM

Cancers are largely individual, you'll need to find out if the cancer does indeed have upregulated insulin receptors, which would suggest a preference for glucose metabolism. Regardless, even in ketosis, blood glucose is around 'normal' levels so I'm not sure it's necessarily a starvation mechanism in play.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 27, 2013
at 12:42 PM

Grain-fed beef is a poor source of PUFAs, so even if it has a terrible ratio, it has a negligible effect on the diet's balance of PUFA as a whole. This assumed you're eating a normal diet, not some 50% of all calories from beef tallow sort of WAPF-silliness.

You've talked of avocados before, PUFAs at just 10% of calories, too low to fret over the 15:1 omega ratio (which is a natural whole-food ratio). Compare either to a non-whole food such as corn oil, 55% of calories as PUFAs, 46:1 omega-6:3 ratio.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on September 26, 2013
at 11:35 PM

That's what I've heard. I've seen debate here on both sides of the fence, so check around and make sure you're comfortable with that conclusion.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 26, 2013
at 09:41 PM

Any idea roughly how much we have to worry about PUFA in grain fed beef?

Also, do you happen to know what kinds/categories of cancer tend to like glucose more, and which ones would be resistant to ketosis?

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 26, 2013
at 09:39 PM

So, soy products like miso and soy sauce are okay? I'm guessing that the fermentation breaks apart the estrogen-like molecules?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 26, 2013
at 09:35 PM

Re: Omega 3-6 ratio in grain-fed beef, it's poorer than grass-fed, but grass-fed is not high omega-3 regardless. It's not high in PUFA either at <4% calories - look to other sources of PUFA in your diet before singling out your beef.

Re: sugar feeding cancer. Not all cancers like sugar, it's a case-by-case sort of thing. Blanket statements to go into ketosis when you get a cancer diagnosis is not prudent.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on September 26, 2013
at 06:30 PM

I did forget to mention that the anti-cancer book recommended that you should avoid unfermented soy, which is in a lot of places. It seems to have some chemicals that mimic estrogen, which seems to be correlated with cancers, especially breast cancer.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 26, 2013
at 06:01 PM

THANK YOU so much for your help! This is exactly what I'm looking for. You've confirmed some of my thoughts and added some other food for thought. I just know that with the right information and a supportive environment I can do a lot more for her than some doctor, though I do recognize the need for immediate medical intervention. I just can't think about much else right now. I'm so distracted at work. I know it's getting to her just the same if not worse and feel selfish worrying about how distracted I am when she's actually got the big lump in her breast.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 26, 2013
at 03:58 PM

Funny because I've always been the one who HAD to eat breakfast within an hour of waking - until I stopped eating a bowl of cereal each morning. I swapped it out for fruit, then gradually could eat anything Paleo or even skip it with little trouble. She never had a strong breakfast habit so maybe she can handle it fine. I'm just also worried about mood and such - as the psychological aspect is important in fighting cancer...

Medium avatar

(238)

on September 26, 2013
at 03:29 PM

I read about studies with rats and how the majority of them fasting survived compared to the non fasting ones when given Chemo. As to the man/woman thing I've heard that it could interfere with pregnancy but that seems like a non issue for the moment. I'd do more research if I was you.

I'm in my late 50's, male and IF has really helped me get my weight loss back on track and my muscle development the best I've ever had. I have no trouble with skipping breakfast, however my wife goes nuts if she misses by an hour or so on breakfast.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 26, 2013
at 03:23 PM

Thank you. I remember reading that IF is best for males and has limited results in women, except if it's spread out further like fast once a week or something. I think it was on Marks Daily Apple... Any thoughts on that? What's your ASL? well, just age and sex really.

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5 Answers

0
23fe01308e3320ecf144b47b99a135a4

(149)

on September 27, 2013
at 10:53 AM

I also agree with all these posts but would like to add, can you ring your doctor's surgery and tell them she has a growing breast lump and could they get you in any sooner? Even when they are fully booked, most doctors surgeries will move less urgent appointments around when something serious comes along.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 27, 2013
at 10:00 PM

Well, we have Kaiser so... the answer is a big "maybe" The real question is whether we could get 'hold of anyone of consequence in the first place. Her appointment is this Tuesday the 1st and all they will do is check it out. I don't know just how urgent it is!?!?!

0
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on September 27, 2013
at 10:12 AM

I agree with every comment made so far, I would have written the same advice. and upvoted all of them. Very useful thread.

0
9215c97e4d3296f0de599ef9292cee15

on September 27, 2013
at 09:18 AM

I think ketosis is as close to the perfect anti-cancer diet as you can get. You will hear alot of people saying vegan, but I don't buy that at all. Sugar is very inflammatory and like others have said cancer seems to love glucose. This is a no-brainer for me. I can tell you personally that if tomorrow I found out I had cancer I would get as close to zero carb as I could. Ketosis has served me well for dealing with every other health issue in my life, I would just as soon use it to fight cancer then.

Be803dcde63e3cf5e21cc121097b8158

(529)

on September 28, 2013
at 01:57 AM

I looked into this claim, but unfortunately I don't see it strongly supported by the research. But maybe the science just isn't there yet?

Treating astrocytoma (mostly in mice) has shown a lot of promise, but the same kind of results haven't materialized when treating other types of tumors. In fact, Paul Jaminet has written about the link between gastrointestinal cancer and VLC diets.

On the other hand, the work of Thomas Seyfried in Cancer as a Metabolic Disease is pretty exciting to contemplate.

0
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on September 26, 2013
at 04:48 PM

Glad you came here. I came to paleo via the anti-cancer route. I've had lymph cancer twice and came across the book "Anti-cancer" and it, well, changed my life. It helped me see that everything I eat and everything I do affects me on a molecular level, which completely changed my perspective on diet and exercise. While I was researching about producing vitamin D from the sun (why is the sun bad, but we need it? Wassup?) and came across Marks Daily Apple. I realized that paleo/primal was almost exactly the same as what I had researched, but with a few differences. For instance, the Anti-cancer book pushed whole grains and avoiding the sun too much. Paleo, put those things into perspective, and my knowledge of how the body works helped me understand why paleo worked so well for me.

First things first. If your gal has cancer, she needs a cancer doc. You might be able to reverse, but I would never risk it. The system is broke and you need it fixed right away. After that, work on lifelong prevention.

The cornerstones of anti-cancer are pretty much the same as paleo.

1. Avoid carcinogens. Makes sense. Don't smoke. Don't hang around asbestos. Don't huff spray paint. Also, avoid BPH plastics and, well, unnatural chemicals. Don't give the body more cancer cells than it can handle.

2. Eat the right foods. Leafy greens have great anti-oxidants and are great for gut health. Occasional fruits are good. An apple a day keeps the doctor away. A glass of apple juice - not so good. Eat as natural and organic as you can get (organic goes back to cornerstone one). Meat and veggies are good. Also, eat good fats. They give steady energy and carry vitamins (fat soluble).

3. Don't eat the wrong foods. This list is a mile long, but let's look at the biggest offenders.

a. Sugar. Excess sugar and refined carbs (and it doesn't take much) spike glucose levels and insulin. Along with a host of issues, it's really important when it comes to cancer. Cancer cells have 10 times the number of insulin receptors and it LOVES sugar. Spiking your blood glucose is giving cancer the food it needs to thrive. There's a lot of research that shows that cancer cells do NOT thrive in a ketogenic state. There are some rare cancers that do survive, and if you're very far along, it might be too late, but you very best line of defense is to keep blood sugar levels and insulin levels low.

I have a big issue with paleo sites that push "Paleo Desserts." They are better alternative than regular desserts, but it's very easy to overdo and keep blood sugar levels high. A paleo brownie is better than a normal brownie, but sugar is sugar, no matter where it came from, even a coconut. Avoid!

b. Inflammation. When you cut yourself, the area around reddens and swells up. This is the body in speedy recovery mode. The cells need to replicate as fast as possible to repair the damage. Certain foods will keep your inflammation levels high, even if you don't have anything to repair. If you have cancer and high inflammation, the body has the green light to have cells duplicate rapidly, masking the growth and spread of cancer. Vegetable oils have high levels of Omega 6s, which are pro-inflammatory. The Omega 6/3 ratio in grain fed beef is way off and can lead to an inflammatory state.

Pretty much any processed foods will have bad fats (like unnatural Trans-Fats), extra sugars, refined carbs, etc. If you cook your foods, you know what's in it.

4. Exercise. This is a tough one, because there's so many ways to do it. We've seen that long bouts of steady state cardio can increase cortisol levels and some people get injured over time. Short intense bouts of exercise increases HGH (that's good) and helps regulate other hormones. 30 minutes of walking lowers cortisol and is a must do every day.

One of the most important aspects of exercise is blood sugar control. Sure, there's a lot of other benefits, but for cancer, this it probably the key element. Less blood sugar, the less food for cancer. Strenuous exercise will not only burn more sugar, but the muscles will take in more after the exercise, keeping blood sugar levels low and insulin resistance where it should be. Insulin resistance means your body needs to pump out more insulin to force glucose into cells, which are refusing more sugar. Except cancer. Cancer will take all the sugar you can give it.

5. Ease your mind. A good positive attitude helps your stress levels. That seems to be a big factor in the spread of cancer. Some say that meditation is good. Others like yoga. Hanging out with friends is very important as well. We have a tendency to ignore our needs as a social animal and rely more on bulletin boards like this or facebook. Nothing replaces a hug. I've read that humans need at least 6 meaningful physical contacts a day to keep stress hormones in check. This area is oft ignored in health, but it does come to play.

For the most part, the Paleo diet is perfect for anti-cancer, but you need to adapt to keep the sugars down.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 26, 2013
at 06:01 PM

THANK YOU so much for your help! This is exactly what I'm looking for. You've confirmed some of my thoughts and added some other food for thought. I just know that with the right information and a supportive environment I can do a lot more for her than some doctor, though I do recognize the need for immediate medical intervention. I just can't think about much else right now. I'm so distracted at work. I know it's getting to her just the same if not worse and feel selfish worrying about how distracted I am when she's actually got the big lump in her breast.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 26, 2013
at 09:35 PM

Re: Omega 3-6 ratio in grain-fed beef, it's poorer than grass-fed, but grass-fed is not high omega-3 regardless. It's not high in PUFA either at <4% calories - look to other sources of PUFA in your diet before singling out your beef.

Re: sugar feeding cancer. Not all cancers like sugar, it's a case-by-case sort of thing. Blanket statements to go into ketosis when you get a cancer diagnosis is not prudent.

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on September 26, 2013
at 03:21 PM

Hopefully everything turns out ok !

I've been reading a lot about fasting and it seems to hold promise as a good treatment on its own as well as with Chemo. I do IF 16/8 just as my new way of life.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 26, 2013
at 03:23 PM

Thank you. I remember reading that IF is best for males and has limited results in women, except if it's spread out further like fast once a week or something. I think it was on Marks Daily Apple... Any thoughts on that? What's your ASL? well, just age and sex really.

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