5

votes

Accurate calorie needs

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 30, 2012 at 7:56 PM

Out of curiosity, is there anyway to obtain a rough estimate of caloric needs on a daily basis that is actually accurate? I'm not hyper/hypo in any clinical sense, but the calorie calculators estimate calorie amounts that keep me hungry or low on energy--which leads to binging when I can't take it anymore. Any1 have any calorie calcs that they have had good results with..etc?

Dfeb3c1ef269c5dc03154d1689c14373

(716)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

and i'm a male.

4cf852260c5839c15746b03e934f0e76

(20)

on August 07, 2012
at 01:34 AM

Just want to note that nutrition content of foods changes during the cooking process - this is experimentally established food science. Heat renders out some of the fat and proteins (typically collagen) in meat, fish, etc. The same cut of steak will have different nutrition content when it is raw compared to when it is cooked, and depending on how long it is cooked for and by what method (braised vs. grilled, for example).

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 06, 2012
at 04:18 AM

Well worth the money!

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 06, 2012
at 03:01 AM

In some ways, yeah. My appetite is a lot better than it was a year ago, so I feel very lucky in that! (I had an ulcer and stuff, not an ED, just to clarify). I don't know how it feels on the "I don't want to stop eating!" side, but I can tell you the "I want to throw up but I am shaking, cold, and can't think straight" side is pretty sucky too.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on August 04, 2012
at 05:30 AM

Nice on the rowing analogy but I was totally opposite lol- I would never push myself as hard as when I was striving for a specific split. If I didn't know, I would not know when to kick it up and push to collapse. On the water, different story, but erg was a huge mental game with numbers for me! Guess everyone is different.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 04, 2012
at 03:52 AM

hey sorry. I definitely mis-read/understood your Answer. My bad

A7925ab8ea44e6d4d5d7c6f202632c6c

(404)

on August 04, 2012
at 02:12 AM

@Crowlover: that's only about 150 g (5oz) of almonds

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 04, 2012
at 01:17 AM

hey sorry. I definitely mis-read/understood your Answer (and also thought you are a women). My bad.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 04, 2012
at 12:36 AM

Most healthy people find that modest calories restriction works. Low-carb helps with this because it drives hunger down but whether you manipulate it with hormones or brute-force analyse it you will get to the same place.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 04, 2012
at 12:30 AM

For the record I can prove that this does in fact work for me so "Ummm NO" all you want. Since my post didn't apply to you, having an autoimmune disease not in remission precludes being "healthy". Sheesh

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 04, 2012
at 12:28 AM

Yes and you aren't an active, 30 year old 6'5" tall male. I thought the point was to share OUR thoughts. Maybe you should write your own post if you have a different answer and perspective.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on August 04, 2012
at 12:10 AM

I thought we were past the whole 3500 calories a pound thing. It's much more complicated than just having a 500 cal/day deficit to lose a pound a week. If it were that simple, then everyone would lose weight easily.

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on August 03, 2012
at 11:07 PM

Wow, awesome. 1700-2000 calories for me. I can totally live on that.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:26 PM

Luckie - you are lucky!!

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:24 PM

I meant 200 extra calories plus or minus. In other words 150-350 extra calories per day over what I needed. To lose one pound per week my Livestrong app put me on a 1365 cal per day diet and it is working.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:22 PM

Uhmmmm NO. Not for everyone. I ate mindfully and never overate EVER and the 200=/- calories extra per day more than I needed was enough to stop me from losing an ounce. Just be glad you can eat that much. I barely lose weight on 1000kcal less than that. And yes Im serious and NO I am not eating too little. My metabolism just sucks due to Hashimotos and being 50, I guess.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:20 PM

and can you seriously eat 1000kcal of almonds!? That is a hellofa lot of almonds.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:18 PM

It's hard English Rose. I am on a 1360 cal per day diet to lose (supposedly) a pound a week. Actually, I have lost a pound a week since I started. Wow. I just realized that. I am trying to exercise more intensely rather than just my fast walks and yoga, pilates, dance but I'm not consistent and it cannot be counted on. I only had 5-8lbs to lose and have already lost 5!

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on August 03, 2012
at 09:23 PM

I really like the comparison to erging. You're right - I've noticed that I suddenly feel hungry when I see from my online calorie counting tool that I haven't eaten as many calories that day as I usually do. But when I'm not tracking I easily get through the day with less.

014e7a87621b34bead8645fde586f6cd

(100)

on August 03, 2012
at 08:40 PM

Ugh. I have coconut oil control problems too. :/

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on August 03, 2012
at 07:32 PM

I'm wondering whether these calorie calculators are going to work for someone who is running on more on ketones versus the standard glucose for the SAD people? Of course it's always N=1, but I don't find that I need nearly as many calories as the calculators say I do. Which is probably good, because I also have a low appetite and getting 1700+ calories down the hatch daily (even when calculating on the sedentary side of the scale, wow) is hard for me and would be about impossible if I didn't drink the full-fat milk as much as I do.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on August 03, 2012
at 07:28 PM

3000 calories will be tough even on high-carb paleo. That is just a ton of potatoes and sweet potatoes and squashes. This is precisely why I incorporated grains again. I'm doing 3000-3500 daily and that's just too much potato. Rice, oats, buckwheat make it easier and more interesting for me. Straight sugar and coconut water, too.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on August 03, 2012
at 07:26 PM

I'd say you could try 2800-3000 daily and see how that goes. You might gain a little on that but you can always go up or down in something like 300calorie chunks

Dfeb3c1ef269c5dc03154d1689c14373

(716)

on August 03, 2012
at 01:12 PM

i'm a male and 22 years old

Dfeb3c1ef269c5dc03154d1689c14373

(716)

on August 03, 2012
at 01:11 PM

I'm 5'8'', 170 pounds, I try to run 30-45 mins every day and do minimal str training 2-3 times a week. THe main thing holding me back is when I eat clean it's very hard for me to stomach enough calories--I end up feeling exhausted and binging on high calorie junk foods. Sadly, after these binges I feel full of energy and ready to run...etc.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 31, 2012
at 01:30 AM

What's your height, weight, age, sex, and give us some kind of info regarding your activity level.

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17 Answers

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6
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on August 03, 2012
at 09:08 PM

Let me preface with a short story.

I used to row lightweight crew. During the winter, we would practice indoors on the ergs (rowing machines) which are equipped with a device that says how much work you are doing. For example, over a 10,000 meter row, you may pull an average 500 meter split of 1:52. The whole time you're on the erg and rowing, you think your pushing yourself as hard as you can go, because last time you rowed, say, a 1:53 split and you think you've pushed your limit. After a few practices, coach would have us row blind- that is with the ergometer turned away, so only he and the coxswains can see what we're pulling. Invariably, everyone pulls harder and sets a new PR. That is, we did better and pushed ourselves further because we didn't have a frame of reference to judge our efforts on.

Apply this to BMR calculators and trying to eat accordingly, and the same is true (at least for me, I do not believe that I am an anomaly). I have no idea how many calories I burn during the day, and I generally have no idea how many calories I eat. However, when I am leaning up, I try to eat around 1gram of protein per pound to preserve muscle mass. For me, that is roughly 135-145 grams of protein. I set that target of protein and eat to get that in. Once I've got it, I stop eating aside from some berries post workout (I do not count the calories in non-starchy vegetables/roughage). It turns out, when I'm leaning I eat around 50-70% of my calories from protein (about 560 calories), which means I'm only taking in around 900 calories. Now, if I knew my BMR I'd be freaked out and would be like "that's way too little" and would actually try to consume MORE if I had known. BUt, it works for me, as it only takes about 10 days of this to be where I want to be again (with 2 higher carb reefed days where I eat some starch, some honey, and more fruit to refill glycogen so I can still workout with intensity as well as to boost leptin).

When I'm maintaing, again, I have no idea how much it is- I just listen to my body's cues, go by the mirror, appetite, energy levels, etc. I think you should learn to do this too, as it really builds a sense of awareness and trust between you and your body, which a lot of people lack. The only reasons you should not try listening to your body's signals is if 1) you eat when hungry and stop when satisfied but you eat poor quality food or 2) you are morbidly obese and the self control centers in your brain are destroyed so if you only eat when hungry, it will likely be to often or too much, or 3) you are anorexic and your body's cues hunger cues have been suppressed, so that if you only eat when hungry, you'll never gain weight. If you can rule out those 3 things, then screw the calculators and master your own body yourself. it will steer you the right way and tell you when where you're at much accurately than a computer can.

Hope that helps. Just my two cents :)

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on August 03, 2012
at 09:23 PM

I really like the comparison to erging. You're right - I've noticed that I suddenly feel hungry when I see from my online calorie counting tool that I haven't eaten as many calories that day as I usually do. But when I'm not tracking I easily get through the day with less.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on August 04, 2012
at 05:30 AM

Nice on the rowing analogy but I was totally opposite lol- I would never push myself as hard as when I was striving for a specific split. If I didn't know, I would not know when to kick it up and push to collapse. On the water, different story, but erg was a huge mental game with numbers for me! Guess everyone is different.

4
A39237551dac75eb36335098b0f5fa61

(525)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

Most metabolic rate calculators are next to useless. They can give you a ballpark figure, but you have to keep in mind that the error margin could be as high as 30%!

They are usually based on the idea that people with similar height, weight, age, sex and body composition have similar resting metabolic rates. Not so! Studies show invidual variations in RMR can be as high as 30%, and that translate up to 500 calorie difference. 500 calorie error margin kinda throw a wrench on any calorie calculation!

See a good overview of metabolic rate studies here: http://www.howtoloseweightfastguide.net/metabolic-rate-how-many-calories-you-burn-per-day/

Then there's the fact that some people seem to be able to ramp up their metabolic rate during overfeeding. I don't have any studies to back this up, but I've seen this written about in a couple of credible blogs.

All this doesn't mean calories doesn't matter, but that those calculators should be left for weight watchers meetings!

The best idea is just to listen to your body. If you want to lose weight make sure you keep yourself little hungry every day. If you want to gain weight, eat a bit past the point you are full. I don't think it has to be any more complicated than that.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 06, 2012
at 04:18 AM

Well worth the money!

3
21b36b3de8ff31b0d41e7f0f4b5c1e03

(1688)

on August 03, 2012
at 08:02 PM

I use the FitBit. It gives me the caloric expenditure from walking and moving around, and I then manually add any additional activity from lifting, rowing, cycling etc. I've found that if I subtract 250 calories off the final number it gives me every day I have a very accurate picture of calories expended.

2
68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on August 03, 2012
at 07:57 PM

Here's my view.

Calories matter. However, so does food quality/sourcing, timing of intake, hormonal response/activity and other activity.

Paying attention to any of them by itself could cause issues with the others. If done singularily, none of the other 4 can go without check without negative results.

I've consumed insane amounts without any increase in body fat. I've also had issues getting shredded and losing a bit even with micromanagement of this stuff as much as possible.

1
A3a4696c919e916ec971691559e9c942

(2043)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

Have you thought about the BodyBugg? I used it for a while and I don't know if it was "spot on" but I had a # everyday and I could change my intake based on that #. they say it is accurate within 10%. Like I said, I don't know if it was accurate but I could adjust my intake based on the # it gave me each day and I was able to drop the 10 lbs that were bugging me. Having said that, it stopped working after 1 year and never gave an accurate read for some activities like cycling.
I like data so for me it was good, until the damn thing broke. Their customer service was awful too.

1
799abeb19a3f1cbfe706bf8b0a29f8ff

on August 04, 2012
at 01:02 AM

I'll start my answer with that Einstein platitude-like quote:

"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."

The types of food we eat can have significant affect on what horomones our body responds with which can lead to many different feelings, especially appetite.

Back in my pre-paleo day I could eat 2,000 calories of pasta at one meal and still feel hungry. Carbs like that will do that to you. 400 calories of grass-fed butter and 6oz of quality protein will make me feel fuller than 2 pounds of pasta.

Rather than trying to shoot for a target calorie goal (for a while at least), focus on trying different foods combos that are known to curb your hunger and monitor how the food makes you feel and what calories they contribute to your overall energy. (Hence the term "empty calorie".)

There's days where I can stuff 3,000 calories in me and it feels right. Today, for instance, I've only had 1,600 and they were 65% from healthy fat and I'm not sure if I'm even going to have enough appetite to eat another 400 calories for dinner. No worries 'cause I know I can crush 400 calories with some wine ;-)

I know it's a slight perspective change, but focusing more on feeling healthy, full of energy, and satiated by accounting the calories that get you there by food choices may be of more advantage to you in the long run when you start to dial in that right target by eating more of what makes you feel full and right.

That said, that target calorie goal will move on you as your metabolism adjusts and your activity levels fluctuate. There's no solid fixed perpetual number to hit.

How you feel and what your body is telling you via testing may ultimately matter more than how you feel about how you look at the end of the day.

1
6fece842bd1bcf5724f458a302a2156e

on August 03, 2012
at 07:50 PM

It's not very many. I just calculated I need only 1700 a day or a bit less to maintain weight and would need to go down to about 1200 even just to lose 1 pound a week. How do people do it? I can easily eat 1000 calories at once of almonds.

A7925ab8ea44e6d4d5d7c6f202632c6c

(404)

on August 04, 2012
at 02:12 AM

@Crowlover: that's only about 150 g (5oz) of almonds

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:20 PM

and can you seriously eat 1000kcal of almonds!? That is a hellofa lot of almonds.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:18 PM

It's hard English Rose. I am on a 1360 cal per day diet to lose (supposedly) a pound a week. Actually, I have lost a pound a week since I started. Wow. I just realized that. I am trying to exercise more intensely rather than just my fast walks and yoga, pilates, dance but I'm not consistent and it cannot be counted on. I only had 5-8lbs to lose and have already lost 5!

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 03, 2012
at 07:20 PM

I used to worry about this but I ate mindfully and to satiety and for 1 week I weighed everything to the half gram. My calories were between 2560 and 2640 everyday without fail whether it was 3 high carb meals or 1 heavy fat meal post IF. Once you are healthy calories counting probably isn't needed.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:22 PM

Uhmmmm NO. Not for everyone. I ate mindfully and never overate EVER and the 200=/- calories extra per day more than I needed was enough to stop me from losing an ounce. Just be glad you can eat that much. I barely lose weight on 1000kcal less than that. And yes Im serious and NO I am not eating too little. My metabolism just sucks due to Hashimotos and being 50, I guess.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 04, 2012
at 12:28 AM

Yes and you aren't an active, 30 year old 6'5" tall male. I thought the point was to share OUR thoughts. Maybe you should write your own post if you have a different answer and perspective.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:24 PM

I meant 200 extra calories plus or minus. In other words 150-350 extra calories per day over what I needed. To lose one pound per week my Livestrong app put me on a 1365 cal per day diet and it is working.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 04, 2012
at 01:17 AM

hey sorry. I definitely mis-read/understood your Answer (and also thought you are a women). My bad.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 04, 2012
at 12:30 AM

For the record I can prove that this does in fact work for me so "Ummm NO" all you want. Since my post didn't apply to you, having an autoimmune disease not in remission precludes being "healthy". Sheesh

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 04, 2012
at 03:52 AM

hey sorry. I definitely mis-read/understood your Answer. My bad

1
193f00d53ebcb13940c7a55afc78ad17

on August 03, 2012
at 07:15 PM

You can calculate a pretty good estimate using the above mentioned Harris-Benedict method, but if you want a exact look at what is going on, you'll have to go in for some metabolic testing. http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/cmp/tab/glance

http://www.themetabolic-institute.com/more_info.htm

(Less reputable, but a nice overview) http://www.shape.com/weight-loss/weight-loss-strategies/metabolic-testing-should-you-try-it

That would show the full state of your body's metabolism and allow you to find the exact number of calories you need. Granted that number will change with activity levels, but that's a different critter altogether.

1
91119f53c3827f5c7fc90b98cab85b04

(799)

on July 30, 2012
at 08:34 PM

Most gyms or personal trainers will calculate your BMR and then use the Harris Benedict Equation - all of the info and calculators are at the following link and also see below for the formulas
http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/harris-benedict-equation/

The BMR formula for Women is: BMR = 655 + ( 4.35 x weight in pounds ) + ( 4.7 x height in inches ) - ( 4.7 x age in years )

Harris Benedict Formula
To determine your total daily calorie needs, multiply your BMR by the appropriate activity factor, as follows:

If you are sedentary (little or no exercise) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.2
If you are lightly active (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.375
If you are moderatetely active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.55
If you are very active (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days a week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.725
If you are extra active (very hard exercise/sports & physical job or 2x training) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.9

Basically, 3500 calories (restriction required to lose a pound), applied over the course of a week is going to require a caloric restriction of 500 calories/day (7 days * 500 calories = 3500) - ideally, this restriction should come from a combination of diet (maybe 2/3 to 3/4 of the calories restricted through diet) and exercise (1/4 to 1/3 of the restriction via exercise)

See how these numbers line up with what you have been eating - use an online calorie tracker like fitday.com for a week to gain a sense of how many calories you are really eating and what your nutrient ratios look like and this should give some better insight

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on August 03, 2012
at 11:07 PM

Wow, awesome. 1700-2000 calories for me. I can totally live on that.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on August 04, 2012
at 12:10 AM

I thought we were past the whole 3500 calories a pound thing. It's much more complicated than just having a 500 cal/day deficit to lose a pound a week. If it were that simple, then everyone would lose weight easily.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 04, 2012
at 12:36 AM

Most healthy people find that modest calories restriction works. Low-carb helps with this because it drives hunger down but whether you manipulate it with hormones or brute-force analyse it you will get to the same place.

1
39d290f0fc2ca0d12006a9147b3584aa

(144)

on July 30, 2012
at 08:00 PM

I joined a gym a few years ago and the most useful thing that came out of that for me was that they calculated on a machine how many calories I use a day. It seems at female, 5'2" and fairly sedentary apart from the dogwalking I use about 1480 a day. I think this is spot on as I find if I eat more than this I put weight on.

I've found since doing paleo though that if you eat enough of the right oils it stops you being hungry. Very hard to resist things when your stomach is gnawing.

Sorry can't be more help than this.

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 06, 2012
at 04:19 AM

You can get a newleaf assessment (or other brand) that will give you your resting calories (RMR) VO2 max. Newleaf comes with a 12 week workout plan as well. You learn your aerobic and anaerobic heart rates as well as max heart rate.

I did this and it is very good.

0
0d3873eb2dd0447baf06139e75c10252

(600)

on August 06, 2012
at 04:17 AM

Truly, the only way to calculate your calorie needs would be in a lab type closed system. The best we can do is a ballpark. That's okay though, because you can only really ballpark your intake, anyways. Unless you are eating only packaged foods (and basically, not even then as manufacturers error is quite high) you can only really guesstimate your caloric intake even if you measure carefully, since the calorie info for various foods is only an AVERAGE of typical samples of that food.

I use fitday to track my foods most days, and have for years. Fitday.com is easy to use and will ballpark your calories in/calories out. But you will see how much the calorie counts vary, when going from various measurements. EG:

200 g lean beef, raw will have x calories. Then, cook that same amount of beef and weigh it again. It now has a different number of calories, according to various calorie charts. Instead, put it in as 2/3 cup of raw beef. Different count again. How is this possible? It isn't, it's simply the limitations of the tools we have at our disposal.This can be about 30% difference. How lean is "lean?" Is it a wet or dry cooking method? What does that even mean? You can see how the issues start to arise. If you try and get more "accurate" about calories, you will make yourself insane.

Try using fitday for awhile and mucking about with your nutritional needs and ratios. They have some handy pie charts and bar graphs that will tell you about your macro and micronutrients. Amazingly, if I have exceeded my micronutrients by about double the "recommended intake" in all zones, I will usually feel full. So the issue for me was not calorie control all along, but eating foods that are more nutrient dense. That being said, you asked about calorie control-

-When using any calorie charts, always weigh and calculate your food raw before cooking. This is a pain in the ass but more accurate. -Always calculate food by weight, never by volume. -Lowball any estimates you get for calories burned during exercise, especially if you are fairly fit. Especially gym machines, they will inflate your calorie count because everyone likes to see the number of biscuits they can eat go up! -Talking about feeling sated and filled with energy, make sure you are getting enough protein and fat. Play with your macro/micronutrients are various calorie levels and find what works for you.

Unfortunately, I don't have a better system than BMR+Lifestyle factors= number that you hope is only somewhat bullcrap.

*emphasized text*But that's okay, because you are not a lab rat or a line of algebra. A ballpark is the best you will get, and then YOU have calibrate intake vs quality vs ratios, nobody can do that for you. And nobody can tell you you're right or wrong, except your energy levels and the mirror. Happy hunting.

4cf852260c5839c15746b03e934f0e76

(20)

on August 07, 2012
at 01:34 AM

Just want to note that nutrition content of foods changes during the cooking process - this is experimentally established food science. Heat renders out some of the fat and proteins (typically collagen) in meat, fish, etc. The same cut of steak will have different nutrition content when it is raw compared to when it is cooked, and depending on how long it is cooked for and by what method (braised vs. grilled, for example).

0
7278560e76901ded4081022b54c6e165

on August 06, 2012
at 02:57 AM

Yeah I appear to have the same problem, I plan to follow the limit but perhaps at the final meal of the day add a little extra fat such as a Tbsp or two of butter and see how you feel?

0
A7925ab8ea44e6d4d5d7c6f202632c6c

(404)

on August 04, 2012
at 01:12 AM

my personal belief is that conventional calorie needs estimates are a complete hoax: most of the energy derived from food is consumed for digestion and dealing with the various stresses ensuing from it: eating less often (much less) streamlines and optimizes functioning of the human body, so the 'furnace' doesn't operate in vain: so, yeahh, that's it: eat less, eat paleo, move more...

0
4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

on August 03, 2012
at 09:18 PM

I'm having really good luck with the Livestrong My Plate app I bought for my iPhone.

I am FINALLY losing weight. My metabolism sucks (Hashimotos) and I was underestimating my daily calorie intake (a VERY common occurrence) by 100-300 calories a day before I started using this. That doesn't sound like much but for me, its everything.

I was really hesitant to have to keep track of calories but I needed this. Im unclear if you are trying to lose weight or maintain (or gain) but all those variables can be factored into this program. I like the app a lot. Its easy to use and easy to input foods.

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2194b1863657b6be2e49ae0dac911c72

on July 30, 2012
at 08:32 PM

I have tried a lot of calorie calculators, but I suspect that calorie restriction was never the cause of my carb cravings (I assume we're talking about carb binging here). I reduced my carb cravings once I started making sure that I met at least the RDA micronutrient recommendations. I also noticed that I have more carb cravings if I don't sleep enough.

Then, my cravings for binging went away once I started doing weekly carb refeeds, which I usually do on Saturdays. In the days right after the refeed, I don't think about binging and I'm barely hungry at all. The closer I get to the refeed day, the harder it gets, but then I "binge" on coconut oil, which is "sweet" enough.

Here are some good MDA articles on carb cravings (1, 2) and carb refeeds (3, 4, 5).

014e7a87621b34bead8645fde586f6cd

(100)

on August 03, 2012
at 08:40 PM

Ugh. I have coconut oil control problems too. :/

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