3

votes

The ossified man

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 28, 2011 at 5:52 PM

My question is how to avoid this state? I am apprehensive that I may be overconsuming calcium in the form of two eggshells per day. What is the best dose per day for the athletic young man and what are the best arguments pro and con?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 03, 2011
at 02:03 AM

Sun exposure: 20 minutes per day + 1x 400i.u tablet of D3, otherwise up to 8 tabs if no sun exposure. Would this be too much? So much (mis)information out there: 10000i.u, 400i.u...who knows!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 03, 2011
at 02:01 AM

Thanks for the reply. I have decided to back off on the calcium supplementation top 1/2 chicken egg per day but I'm not sure I'm getting much magnesium. Canned tuna(x1 average), beef(1b., raw), 1 dozen eggs(?)? Let me know what I should do as per your recommendations, I'd appreciate the feedback.

B0454de6d4f4cdd9ca2e59021dc105bf

(606)

on July 30, 2011
at 01:16 AM

No idea, but Dr. William Davis of the Track Your Plaque blog has a lot to say about vitamin D supplementation. He says that "the longer you take vitamin D, the less you need". http://bit.ly/nU5o1U

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 29, 2011
at 08:54 PM

Thats one of the worries John. Hence the question. I'm thinking I will consume 1/2 eggshell per day and nothing else(cheese sometimes to substitue). As to Vit.D I get approx. 30 minutes of sun per day or tablets(D3). What would you recommend for D?

332d9f75d1077abafff6887681f6b130

(1081)

on July 29, 2011
at 03:34 PM

How do you eat an egg shell? Just pop in in your mouth and chow down? That doesn't sound too pleasant...

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on July 29, 2011
at 01:15 AM

eating 2 eggshells a day isn't going to cause soft tissue calcification.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 28, 2011
at 11:49 PM

I just dropped an eggshell into a glass of vinegar and it start fizzing, so I would assume it is bioavailable. Eggshell is organic. It did fizz slowly in the vinegar, but I'm sure hydrochloric acid would kick it up a notch.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 28, 2011
at 10:36 PM

I was under the impression that the calcium content of 1 large eggshell was 800 mg? That is obviously a lot less than 3,000! The source I consulted stated the former. What would you recommend for daily mgs. of calcium if anything?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 28, 2011
at 10:33 PM

I assume the eggshell calcium is bioavailable. Judging from its effects on the body it 'feels' that way and other indices point to the fact(+electrical conduction/nervous stimulation; +bone mineral deposition as detected by solidity of teeth and general feeling of hardness).

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 28, 2011
at 10:31 PM

basically that was it only perhaps in a less extreme form, eg. "calcification of the soft tissues and stiffness of joints" type of state. That is what I'm trying to avoid.

07154e6d8e42065f230d06249700fe5b

(2057)

on July 28, 2011
at 09:59 PM

I don't know if it's too weird, I used egg shells for bone broth.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 28, 2011
at 09:07 PM

Nice citing of more info. Thanks.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:57 PM

@jack - d'oh! ok. (*sad trombone*)

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:56 PM

d'oh! ok. (*sad trombone*)

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:48 PM

I put them in all my bone broths.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:33 PM

lol grenadine. it may be, but for the record, i was just joking around. i have no idea. it's true that some people do grind up eggshells for calcium, but my answer here is primarily for good humor. i don't think there's much substance here.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:26 PM

"The calcium is more bioavailable than that of whole milk cheese." --- Interesting!

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:06 PM

love the new tag meliss. well played.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on July 28, 2011
at 06:59 PM

is the calcium in eggshells bioavailable?

  • 77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

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6 Answers

7
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on July 28, 2011
at 08:43 PM

Firstly, if you eat calcium rich dairy products such as cheese or milk then I doubt you need any extra calcium.


So how much calcium is in an eggshell? I shall assume you are talking about averaged sized chicken eggs.

Most of the estimates seem to say that a chicken eggshell weighes apporimately 5-6 grams. About 95% of this is calcium carbonate. With around 2 grams of elemental calcium. (Source)

Each egg shell probably contains several grams of calcium carbonate. Upto 6,000 milligrams.

If you eat 2 eggs shells per day you could be consuming many times more calcium than you need. I would be cautious about overdosing on it.

I don't know of any recommendations for how much eggshell to ingest as a calcium supplemnt. Maybe you could grind it into a powder and add a pinch of it to you food each day. Or a quarter teaspoon of ground eggshell. The calcium from eggshells appears to be easily absorbed by your body.

I would suggest that you stop eating 2 whole egg shells a day.

This looks like a usefull link: How to Make Calcium using Egg Shells


Some scientific links to pubmed:

Mineral, amino acid, and hormonal composition of chicken eggshell powder and the evaluation of its use in human nutrition.

Positive effects of a chicken eggshell powder-enriched vitamin-mineral supplement on femoral neck bone mineral density in healthy late post-menopausal Dutch women.

The present study indicates that healthy late post-menopausal women with an adequate Ca intake at baseline may increase BMD of the hip within 12 months following supplementation with the chicken eggshell powder-enriched supplement.

Chicken eggshell matrix proteins enhance calcium transport in the human intestinal epithelial cells, Caco-2.

Eggshell calcium in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

The bioavailability of calcium from this source, as tested in piglets, was similar or better than that of food grade purified calcium carbonate. Clinical and experimental studies showed that eggshell powder has positive effects on bone and cartilage and that it is suitable in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 28, 2011
at 09:07 PM

Nice citing of more info. Thanks.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 28, 2011
at 10:36 PM

I was under the impression that the calcium content of 1 large eggshell was 800 mg? That is obviously a lot less than 3,000! The source I consulted stated the former. What would you recommend for daily mgs. of calcium if anything?

3
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:13 PM

the-ossified-man

You can also roast eggshells over an open fire for 30 minutes. I've never tried it, and I really don't know why you'd want to do that, but you can indeed do it.

If it's strong bones you are interested in for climbing the mountainous ridges were you are camping out in the wilderness, well, then my advice is to up your intake of eggshells for sure. The calcium is more bioavailable than that of whole milk cheese, which I know you also gorge on.

May the Paleo force be with you PersonMan.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:57 PM

@jack - d'oh! ok. (*sad trombone*)

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:33 PM

lol grenadine. it may be, but for the record, i was just joking around. i have no idea. it's true that some people do grind up eggshells for calcium, but my answer here is primarily for good humor. i don't think there's much substance here.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:56 PM

d'oh! ok. (*sad trombone*)

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:48 PM

I put them in all my bone broths.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on July 28, 2011
at 07:26 PM

"The calcium is more bioavailable than that of whole milk cheese." --- Interesting!

3
7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on July 28, 2011
at 06:03 PM

You're not going to develop fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva from eating too much calcium. If that's not what you mean by "ossified" i have no idea what to say.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 28, 2011
at 10:31 PM

basically that was it only perhaps in a less extreme form, eg. "calcification of the soft tissues and stiffness of joints" type of state. That is what I'm trying to avoid.

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on July 29, 2011
at 01:15 AM

eating 2 eggshells a day isn't going to cause soft tissue calcification.

2
5b69a02dadcae753771921d913909215

(1457)

on July 28, 2011
at 09:04 PM

Oddly enough I have bones in my scalpula that never fully ossified and yet I got a calcium deposit in my patelar tendon seemingly from consuming extra calcium while I had tendonitis.

I don't go out of my way to get extra calcium anymore. I just focus on my vitamins and other minerals and hope it's enough. Actually, I got hit by a car recently and had some bone bruising but no break so I guess I am doing it right.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 02, 2011
at 05:41 AM

If you aren't getting enough magnesium or it doesn't absorb then calcium can become toxic in excess. It's best to make sure you're doing good with mag(natural source) before taking extra calcium.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 03, 2011
at 02:01 AM

Thanks for the reply. I have decided to back off on the calcium supplementation top 1/2 chicken egg per day but I'm not sure I'm getting much magnesium. Canned tuna(x1 average), beef(1b., raw), 1 dozen eggs(?)? Let me know what I should do as per your recommendations, I'd appreciate the feedback.

1
B0454de6d4f4cdd9ca2e59021dc105bf

on July 29, 2011
at 02:59 PM

I believe that vitamin D plays a big role in how calcium is metabolized so you might want to look into that as well. If you had a lot of spare calcium kicking around in your bloodstream, isn't it possible that could contribute to plaque formation in your arteries?

B0454de6d4f4cdd9ca2e59021dc105bf

(606)

on July 30, 2011
at 01:16 AM

No idea, but Dr. William Davis of the Track Your Plaque blog has a lot to say about vitamin D supplementation. He says that "the longer you take vitamin D, the less you need". http://bit.ly/nU5o1U

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 29, 2011
at 08:54 PM

Thats one of the worries John. Hence the question. I'm thinking I will consume 1/2 eggshell per day and nothing else(cheese sometimes to substitue). As to Vit.D I get approx. 30 minutes of sun per day or tablets(D3). What would you recommend for D?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 03, 2011
at 02:03 AM

Sun exposure: 20 minutes per day + 1x 400i.u tablet of D3, otherwise up to 8 tabs if no sun exposure. Would this be too much? So much (mis)information out there: 10000i.u, 400i.u...who knows!

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