3

votes

calcium for my children

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 31, 2011 at 10:32 PM

My daughter is inpatient at the Hospital. I mentioned our paleo lifestyle because of the hospital food choices. Now the dietician is accusing that she is missing vitamins and minerals (she didnt say which) and calcium. I know there is calcium in the almond milk. what else can I say now to them they are going to make me meet with a pediatric nutritionist.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 31, 2011
at 11:00 PM

she didnt say anything about being tod to give her daughter calcium. she said that the RD was concerned her daughter wasnt getting ENOUGH calcium which she might not be. they want her to meet with a nutritionist. i dont think thats unreasonable, depending on her age and medical status.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 31, 2011
at 10:53 PM

give them calcium

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 31, 2011
at 10:43 PM

do not do WHAT exactly

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 31, 2011
at 10:42 PM

how old is your daughter? is she in for a chronic or acute illness? what sorts of food does she eat? most importantly, im so sorry that your baby is sick, and i really hope that she will be ok.

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12 Answers

9
8f46bdba543e1ea2c3818f4b243ff040

on August 31, 2011
at 11:29 PM

My son (now 8 months) has a congenital heart issue, so I deal w the crazy hospital nutritionists all the time. I argued, cried, screamed and pleaded my case while there. The nutritionsts pull out their magic calculators and tell you what they are paid to tell you. Reality is...they will not listen to you because they think they know more and the more you argue and try to make your point, the longer they will keep your child. If your child is getting a good healthy Paleo diet at home, the best thing you can do is get him or her outta there and back to their regular diet. If the problem he or she is having is directly related to nutritional deficiencies, listen to what they have to say, but know that you are ultimately the person most concerned about your child, and you know better how your child functions. Don't let it intimidate you...cause I know how that feels. Calmly Ask them to show you the research. They treat you MUCH better if you are the one asking the questions...just do it in love!

5
3f5bbb444498a24f1a9720d75fa7c903

on August 31, 2011
at 11:03 PM

Ask her how people got calcium into their diets after weaning from breastmilk before the domestication of cows and goats. That should stump her.

3
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 31, 2011
at 10:48 PM

Ask them if they have the same policy with vegetarian and gluten-free mothers.

And then draw up a sample food menu (or take a picture of the inside of your refrigerator, lol) to show them what you feed her on any given day. They might be thinking you're forcing her into eating low-carb or something that mainstream detractors try to attach to Paleo.

2
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on September 01, 2011
at 04:37 AM

The best thing to do is just bring your own food and sidestep the question entirely. This is not uncommon in hospitals (because many patients realize that typical hospital food is not particularly healthy, or for cultural or taste reasons), and seeing a child eating real, nutritious, high quality foods (assuming the child has an appetite, of course) is unlikely to raise the same sort of questions as a list of dietary restrictions that are quite likely impossible for the hospital to accommodate.

Don't stress the nutritionist thing. Remember that they're simply providing you with information, and it's your choice how to act on it. You don't have to get argumentative or convince the nutritionist that Paleo is the One True Way. Put together some sample daily menus, and take the opportunity to see if there are any nutritional deficits that should be addressed. Maybe they'll even have input into meeting any nutritional lacks in ways that fit with your diet. Keep in mind that they will probably feel obligated to make suggestions even if your diet is perfect, and it isn't a negative reflection on you if they do so.

(This is all assuming that your child doesn't have any glaring nutritional issues (obesity, failure to thrive, diabetes...). If s/he does, it may take a little more preparation to show how your diet addresses these issues.)

2
361e96d70d6d3b91d63f6ad975e60ab6

(840)

on August 31, 2011
at 11:12 PM

If only it were so easy telling them how you want to raise your own children. Goodluck :(

2
78972387772c994caa78513a83978437

on August 31, 2011
at 10:56 PM

Some more details would be helpful, like why she is in the hospital and how old she is, as well as what she eats. In terms of what the doctor said, are you providing her with other sources of calcium besides almond milk? Food fortified isn't as good as the natural stuff- spinach, collards, etc. Here are some foods high in calcium: http://www.vaughns-1-pagers.com/food/calcium-foods.htm

1
Df7e22dbbb8c39f5006d0784feb03845

(175)

on September 01, 2011
at 02:59 PM

One of my children went to the doctor a lot. Unfortunately, my impression of the world of nutrition in the U.S. is that if your not feeding your child fortified cereal, they assume your child is deficient in some mineral/vitamin. The easiest way around this is to have them run a vitamin/mineral analysis on your child's blood. Once they see that the child's blood count of vitamin/mineral is normal the doctors will tell the nutritionist to leave your child a lone. That's what happened to us, anyway.

I hope your child gets better soon.

1
427c8cbb9c2492d74b887fc5cf7a8ce0

on September 01, 2011
at 12:14 AM

Bone meal and eggshell powder are good source of calcium and 100% bio-available (you can make your own eggshell powder) and they're easy to mix with food or drink. I know the recommended dosage is 1/2 tsp eggshell powder per day (which I think equals 800mg calcium). For bone meal the dosage for an adult varies from brand to brand (I use Kal). Now I don't know about dosage for children. Also keep in mind that calcium works with magnesium (colloidal magnesium might be the best choice since it comes in a dropper bottle). Hope this helps. (Of course the bulk of your vitamins and minerals should come from your food but supplementation doesn't hurt especially since we have depleted soils and therefore "anemic" edibles).

0
B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

on September 01, 2011
at 12:27 PM

What you might do is take her normal intake and plug it into something like Fitday so you can show her graphs and such showing what your daughter is actually getting. It's kind of hard to argue with hard numbers.

0
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on September 01, 2011
at 08:14 AM

You didn't say if you and your family eat dairy products, but that is a source of calcium that would be recognized by your typical dietician. If not, then mention almond or rice milk. I am not personally a fan of these, but they are a source of calcium.

Bone broth is a grest source of calcium and other minerals, not sure the nutritonist would "get" that, but it is a Paleo way to get minerals.

I do agree on one point with the nutritionist, I eat Paleo fairly strictly, and entered everything that I ate into FitDay for a few weeks. I learned that I am at about 30-45% RDA on msny minerals including magnesium, manganese, calcium, and vitamin E. I don't necessarily think that the RDA is gospel, but this did make me go "hmmm" and start to watch out for signs of deficiency in these minerals. I also make it a point to eat foods high in minerals, and occasionally take supplements.

0
4fca5e11d50731edbf4cf2ec38691aa3

on August 31, 2011
at 11:35 PM

broccoli is high in calcium,. kale also(which they probably do not serve)

-4
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 31, 2011
at 10:35 PM

Do not do this.......feed your kids paleo food and you gave them calcium

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 31, 2011
at 10:43 PM

do not do WHAT exactly

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 31, 2011
at 10:53 PM

give them calcium

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on August 31, 2011
at 11:00 PM

she didnt say anything about being tod to give her daughter calcium. she said that the RD was concerned her daughter wasnt getting ENOUGH calcium which she might not be. they want her to meet with a nutritionist. i dont think thats unreasonable, depending on her age and medical status.

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