3

votes

Anyone know how much calcium is in bone broth or actual bone?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 19, 2011 at 3:47 AM

I just made me some bone broth and ate about 200 grams worth of very soft lamb bones, they were so good I couldn't stop eating, almost like little crackers. I am still craving them right now. Anyways I was wondering if anyone knew how much calcium there is bone or bone broth, to get a better idea of how much I am consuming.

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

What bones were they exactly, and how did they get so soft? I've slow cooked lots of meat with bones in and never have seen them get soft enough to eat.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on May 28, 2011
at 02:36 PM

Yeah, I don't think eating bones would be a problem. My dog (okay, he's a dog, but our digestive tracts are still pretty similar) can eat an entire beef "knuckle" in one afternoon -- it's not even soft! -- and everything comes out fine. And I've heard of people chewing on the bones every time they eat roasted chicken. Just my opinion, but it wouldn't surprise me at all to find out it's actually a healthy practice. I might even give it a try, now that you mention it. :)

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on May 14, 2011
at 10:14 AM

@ Stephen, they're great for digestion insofar that they, ahem, promote regularity. The "since [they] will neutralise stomach acid" was explaining why you wouldn't want to eat them with a large meal.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on April 02, 2011
at 11:11 AM

why do you want to neutralize stomach acid?

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on April 02, 2011
at 08:59 AM

@justanotherhunt I thought that magnesium competed against calcium absorption. Luckily high vitamin D increases calcium absorption, so I assume most paleos are fine.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on April 02, 2011
at 08:58 AM

Yup, I eat bones after I've made stock (pressure cooker with some lemon juice) and they're really delicious! TI'd say they taste more like pastry than crackers, but good either way. These are normally lamb legs or shoulders, so big bones. It may well be that they taste *so* good because of some underlying deficiency, but I don't think it's particularly worrying. Also they're *great* for digestion (so long as they're not eaten alongside a big meal, since all the calcium will neutralise stomach acid).

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on March 19, 2011
at 08:51 AM

It comes out fine. I do it all the time.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on March 19, 2011
at 08:50 AM

Welcome to the world of bone eating. Soooo tasty! And good question. I've been doing this for a while now, and get mine in a similar was as you. Slow cooking. And mostly lamb for me.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on March 19, 2011
at 08:49 AM

Welcome to the world of bone eating. Sooooo tasty!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 05, 2011
at 05:25 AM

One of the best ways to insure you're getting calcium(and it's absorbing and not being toxic) is to consume enough magnesium. Most people in the US are deficient so it may be worth supplementing if you can get an additive free good magnesium supplement. Magnesium is vital in order to absorb calcium.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 19, 2011
at 09:37 PM

It came out nice and smooth, no digestion problems at all!!!

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on February 19, 2011
at 05:06 PM

Yes, as per PortlandAllan below, be sure to tell us how it comes out...

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on February 19, 2011
at 03:42 PM

That sounds really good!

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 19, 2011
at 02:41 PM

They were small lamb soup bones from slankers. I left them in the slow cooker on high for 10 hours and then left them on low for about 16 hours.They came out really soft and tasted like crackers to me.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 19, 2011
at 05:11 AM

I was being facetious. I had hoped you were too. Be sure to tell us how it comes out.

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on February 19, 2011
at 04:44 AM

I'm not sure that eating bones qualifies as geophagy or pica. My sardines, kippered herring, and canned salmon all have bones in them. Granted, not 200g of bones, but still.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 19, 2011
at 04:24 AM

....am in trouble? Please elaborate!! For the record, this is the first time I have done this. Do you think my body is missing calcium because I just couldn't stop eating them.

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3 Answers

1
1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 19, 2011
at 05:07 AM

Bones contain more minerals than just calcium, they also contain silica, magnesium, boron, phosphorus...plus probably other minerals that I can't bring to mind right now...so don't assume it's the calcium that is making them taste so good to you. At any rate, I would think that you can trust your body on this, but make sure you chew them very well.

0
Eb8eb239db54910005332883b53241fd

on October 11, 2012
at 04:44 PM

Calcium does not neutralize stomach acid. It is the "carbonate" part of calcium carbonate that neutralizes stomach acid, found in some antacids. Calcium, in it's ionized form, is actually a stimulus for stomach acid because the proton pumps are calcium-gated. The proton pumps have a receptor that ionized calcium (Ca++) sits on, causing the proton pumps to secrete positively charged hydrogen ions, ie, acid (H+). That is the irony of taking calcium based antacids.

0
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on February 19, 2011
at 04:17 AM

Really!?! You ate almost a half pound of bones? You might want to have yourself checked out. Geophagy and pica are usually indicative of a pathological condition.

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on February 19, 2011
at 04:44 AM

I'm not sure that eating bones qualifies as geophagy or pica. My sardines, kippered herring, and canned salmon all have bones in them. Granted, not 200g of bones, but still.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 19, 2011
at 05:11 AM

I was being facetious. I had hoped you were too. Be sure to tell us how it comes out.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 19, 2011
at 04:24 AM

....am in trouble? Please elaborate!! For the record, this is the first time I have done this. Do you think my body is missing calcium because I just couldn't stop eating them.

B124653b19ee9dd438710a38954ed4a3

(1634)

on March 19, 2011
at 08:51 AM

It comes out fine. I do it all the time.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on April 02, 2011
at 11:11 AM

why do you want to neutralize stomach acid?

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on April 02, 2011
at 08:58 AM

Yup, I eat bones after I've made stock (pressure cooker with some lemon juice) and they're really delicious! TI'd say they taste more like pastry than crackers, but good either way. These are normally lamb legs or shoulders, so big bones. It may well be that they taste *so* good because of some underlying deficiency, but I don't think it's particularly worrying. Also they're *great* for digestion (so long as they're not eaten alongside a big meal, since all the calcium will neutralise stomach acid).

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on May 14, 2011
at 10:14 AM

@ Stephen, they're great for digestion insofar that they, ahem, promote regularity. The "since [they] will neutralise stomach acid" was explaining why you wouldn't want to eat them with a large meal.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on May 28, 2011
at 02:36 PM

Yeah, I don't think eating bones would be a problem. My dog (okay, he's a dog, but our digestive tracts are still pretty similar) can eat an entire beef "knuckle" in one afternoon -- it's not even soft! -- and everything comes out fine. And I've heard of people chewing on the bones every time they eat roasted chicken. Just my opinion, but it wouldn't surprise me at all to find out it's actually a healthy practice. I might even give it a try, now that you mention it. :)

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