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Does stress, inducing the liver to release stored sugar lead to glycation?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 03, 2012 at 7:30 PM

If when ingesting stimulants like caffeine or theobromine you are causing the adrenals to release adrenaline which causes the liver to release sugar into the blood will this released sugar have the glycaton effects in the body that ingesting sugar has?

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on October 03, 2012
at 08:50 PM

Great answer. It's the area under the BG curve that counts, much more than the amplitude of the spikes.

3c997ffae3db9464325b96979346d9e9

(1290)

on October 03, 2012
at 08:02 PM

thanks for the response

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2 Answers

2
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on October 03, 2012
at 07:56 PM

I could be wrong, and I'm sure the biochem gurus will correct me if so, but here goes:

Glycation (the non-enzymatic binding of sugars to proteins and other structures, like the membranes of cells that line everything from arteries to organs) is a factor of glucose concentration and time. That means the more glucose in your bloodstream, and the longer it stays there, the more glycation will likely happen.

Now, mind you, glycation is unavoidable. It happens to everyone, no matter how clean your diet and no matter how few carbs you eat. HOWEVER, it's supposed to happen very gradually, over a very loooong period of time. (Glycation is actually part of the aging process -- this is why certain "chronic conditions" that used to be seen only in older people now happen younger and younger -- like all the little kids with T2 diabetes, and people in their 30s and 40s with arteriosclerosis.) The key, again, is glucose concentration and time. So in general, you want to keep your blood glucose levels low, but when they do get higher, like after a high carb meal, or even after a glucose spike from cortisol or adrenaline or something, the important thing is how LONG your blood glucose stays elevated. If you are healthy and sensitive to insulin, your BG should go down in a reasonable amount of time. On the other hand, for someone a little metabolically broken, who is insulin resistant, the BG stays elevated much longer than it should, because the cells won't "allow" insulin to bring the glucose in.

This does not mean we should never drink coffee or be stressed out or eat a high-carb meal. It means we need to pay attention to the multiple factors that contribute to remaining insulin sensitive and make sure we don't get to the point where high levels of glucose stay in the blood for a long time. (An overall lower carb diet can be a huge factor in this, of course, but even if you're eating lower carbs, if you're extremely stressed out all the time, or overexercising, you could theoretically have high blood glucose regardless.)

Long story short, I don't think reasonable use of stimulants like caffeine are a major cause of glycation. A hefty dose coffee a day is pretty different from, say, half a box of Frosted Flakes every morning, or fettuccine and breadsticks, know what I mean?

3c997ffae3db9464325b96979346d9e9

(1290)

on October 03, 2012
at 08:02 PM

thanks for the response

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on October 03, 2012
at 08:50 PM

Great answer. It's the area under the BG curve that counts, much more than the amplitude of the spikes.

1
7f8bc7ce5c34aae50408d31812c839b0

(2698)

on October 03, 2012
at 07:37 PM

This is an interesting question to me because of the premise that caffeine ultimately causes increased blood sugar. I'm not sure this is always true based on observation.

I have been monitoring my morning blood sugar when waking and after I drink my coffee. I have been drinking the exact same amount of coffee with lots of butter and MCT oil in it for a few months now. I notice very little if any change in blood sugar after the ingestion of the coffee. I've monitored from about 1/2 hour to 2 hours after drinking it.

Perhaps one's body gets use to the caffeine and the blood sugar response no longer occurs.

Sorry I dont have an answer to your real question.

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