3

votes

Has anyone dared to replace butter in baked goods with beef tallow?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 05, 2012 at 11:47 PM

I love butter, but when I make bone broth, there is so much fat that I hate to just throw away. I use some for cooking, but because I do a lot of broth, I could never eat the giant frisbee-sized hunk of fat I get each week. I occasionally make paleo baked goods with macademia or almond flour and was wondering if I could sub some of the butter out for the beef fat.

Has anyone tried this? It might taste disgusting. I remember being in Mexico City as a young vegetarian and being horrified of the common use of lard in their cookies. Now I wished I would have tried some of their confections to see what they were like. I know old American cookbooks (pre Crisco) used lard to make flaky pie crust. What about tallow?

Btw, I don't actually know if "tallow" is the correct word for the fat that comes from the marrow bones of a cow.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 08:03 PM

Oh did I mention I also use this as moisturizer for hands? works great. got the idea from the handmaiden's tale by margaret atwood, where the women use butter.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 08:03 PM

thanks RobS! that's right. Sorry if unclear, i have fat from suet (kidneys) and fat from bones (marrow). I use marrow to saute and suet to bake, but even marrow I used for butter/flavor in baking and greasing the pan. I'm sure it's not the BEST choice, but considering I used to use olive oil or canola oil for those things, I think it's much better, and it's free. If you had health problems or were very concerned about oxidizing fats then you should probably limit it.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:36 PM

Suet (Elf's kidney fat) has the highest melting point of all commonly available animal fats. It's very highly saturated. This is why it's great for deep frying. Marrow is the opposite. It's liquid at room temperature and highly unsaturated. I'm not much of a cook but I don't think marrow is suitable for frying.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:35 PM

Suet (your kidney fat) has the highest melting point of all commonly available animal fats. It's very highly saturated. This make is great for deep frying. Marrow is the opposite. It's liquid at room temperature and highly unsaturated. I'm not much of a cook but I don't think marrow is suitable for frying.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:33 PM

Yes, you're right, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks" as she put it. (I assume Lulu's a she.) But that's not all she asked about. She also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Those two questions are not about fat from bone stock. The reason I quoted those two questions was to show that I was answering those two questions. I didn't say anything about her bone stock fat because I assume it's full of marrow, hence strongly flavored and highly unsaturated, and I have no idea how to bake with it. Luckily you do know how and you told her. :)

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:30 PM

Yes, you're right, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks" as she described it. (I assume Lulu's a she.) But that's not all she asked about. She also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Those two questions are not about fat left over from making bone stock. The reason I quoted those two questions was to show that I was answering those two questions. I didn't say anything about her bone stock fat because I assume it's full of marrow, hence strongly flavored and highly unsaturated, and I have no idea how to bake with it.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:29 PM

Yes, you're right, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks" as she described it. (I assume Lulu's a she.) But that's not all she asked about. She also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Those two questions are not about the fat left over from making bone stock. The reason I quoted those two questions was to show that I was answering those two questions. I didn't say anything about the bone stock fat because I assume it's full of marrow, hence strongly flavored and highly polyunsaturated, and I have no idea how to bake with it.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:24 PM

Yes, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks" as she described it. (I assume Lulu's a she.) You're right, from her description we know that she has rendered this fat. But that's not all she asked about. She also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Those two questions are not about the fat left over from making bone stock. The reason I quoted those two questions was to show that I was answering those two questions. I wasn't commenting on the bone-stock fat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:22 PM

Yes, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks" as she described it. (I assume Lulu's a she.) You're right, from her description we know that she has rendered this fat. But that's not all she asked about. She also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Those two questions are not about the fat left over from making bone stock. The reason I quoted those two questions was to show you that I was answering those two questions. I wasn't commenting on the bone-stock fat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:15 PM

Yes, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks," as he or she described it. But that's not all the original poster asked about. The original poster also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Neither of those questions is about the fat left over from making bone stock. I was answering those two questions, not commenting on the bone-broth fat.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 06:38 PM

oh paleohacks. thanks RobS!

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 06:37 PM

sorry when the marrow is in the bones and you use them to make stock, the fat is naturally rendered by floating to the top.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 06:37 PM

I think the OP has the fat from beef bones, not fat cut off from miscellaneous beef parts (say, the ends of ribeye, t-bone, etc.). So, I don't know think the OP needs to render the beef marrow. when you make stock and it's in the bones the marrow, it's pretty much rendered from the stock making.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 06:32 PM

the only thing is that I don't think the marrow from beef bones has the same melting point.... wikipedia says suet is used to deep fry! Huh! I might try that with my fat.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 06:30 PM

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/member/views/HAM-MUSHROOM-CHIVE-SAVORY-CLAFOUTIS-1262227 (you could substitute potato starch for the cornstarch, or try coconut flour, but that might overpower the taste)

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 05:53 PM

the paleo bread 2.0 is pretty dense, so I feel like, not much room for adding stuff. however you could try adding vegetables to the souffle, http://www.foodrenegade.com/creamed-spinach-souffle/ ham and cheese souffle, etc. I personally think a little flour with eggs, (say, a savory clafoutis) would be the way to go with the beef fat.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 05:51 PM

so, the recipe from elana's gluten free pantry (paleo bread 2.0) uses coconut and almond flour, a little bit of coconut oil, honey, apple cider vinegar...It's oooook. But if you really wanted a good "bread" that you can add stuff to like cheese and ham and zucchini or spinach or what have you, you would probably have to cheat with gluten free flour mixes...which I can't do, but if you're going to cheat and have gluten sensitivity/fear it, it might be the way to go.

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on December 06, 2012
at 04:58 PM

This is a great suggestion! I used to (pre-paleo days) make a savory bread with olive oil at the fat and lots of fresh herbs, chunks of manchego and pancetta in it. I wonder if it would work with almond flour?

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 04:44 PM

I don't know, but I upvoted it and yours too.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 04:43 PM

I don't know, but I upvoted yours. :)

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 04:32 PM

Welcome! Let us know if you bake stuff and it turns out yummy!

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on December 06, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Wow! This is extremely helpful. Thank you!

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 03:16 PM

why did someone downgrade this answer? just because he didn't address baking, which is what the quesiton asked?

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on December 06, 2012
at 10:20 AM

Thanks...I will try to research this.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 02:20 AM

Tallow isn't made from marrow. It's rendered adipose tissue. (Tallow made from the hard fat that surrounds the kidneys, has a special name, suet.) to make tallow for baking, I suggest you render fat at the lowest possible heat by chopping it finely and placing it in a big pot of hot (but not simmering) water for an hour or two. When all the fat has risen to the top of the water, remove the solids with a strainer and put the pot in the refrigerator overnight. The fat will become a solid disk at the top of the water. When tallow is made this way, it has a mild taste.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 02:19 AM

Tallow is not made from marrow. It's rendered adipose tissue. However when tallow is made from the hard fat that surrounds the kidneys, it has a special name, suet. If you're going to bake with tallow, I suggest you render it at the lowest possible heat by chopping it finely and placing it in a big pot of hot (but not simmering) water for an hour or two. When all the fat has risen to the top of the water, remove the solids with a strainer and put the pot in the refrigerator overnight. The fat will become a solid disk at the top of the water. When tallow is made this way, it has a mild taste.

  • Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

    asked by

    (1205)
  • Views
    10.8K
  • Last Activity
    1429D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

6
82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 01:32 PM

I know old American cookbooks (pre Crisco) used lard to make flaky pie crust. What about [beef] tallow?

Suet is the type of beef fat most often used in baking. Tallow is a general name for any kind of rendered fat from a variety of animals. Suet is the hard fat around the kidneys of a cow or sheep.

You don't have to bother rendering suet to bake with it, but you can if you want.

Nowadays people use the words tallow and suet in a loose way, and they may not understand the difference between them. For example, U.S. Wellness sells grassfed "suet" but usually what they send you is miscellaneous soft fat from various parts of the cow's body.

Suet corresponds to leaf lard from pigs, which is rendered from the hard fat around the pig's kidneys.

Here's a web page about baking with suet:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/10/the-nasty-bits-baking-with-suet.html

Here's a recipe for suet pastry:

http://www.deliaonline.com/how-to-cook/baking/how-to-make-suet-pastry.html

Here's what suet looks like before it's rendered. As you can see, it's hard and dry. It's very different from marrow.

has-anyone-dared-to-replace-butter-in-baked-goods-with-beef-tallow?

Btw, I don't actually know if "tallow" is the correct word for the fat that comes from the marrow bones of a cow.

Tallow is not made from marrow. Tallow is rendered from subcutaneous and visceral fat.

Of these three fats, suet is the hardest and mildest-tasting. Marrow is the softest and strongest-tasting. Tallow varies because it can be made from almost any fat, but it's usually in the middle. Of course if you make tallow from suet, then it's the same as suet.

If you want to try baking with tallow made from miscellaneous fat rather than from suet, I recommend rendering it at the lowest possible temperature to give it a mild taste. Chop the raw fat finely while it's cold and dump it in a large pot of hot (not simmering) water for an hour or two. Then remove the solids with a strainer and put the pot in the refrigerator overnight. The fat will congeal into a hard white or yellow disk at the top of the water.

The difference between this recipe and the ones you usually see is that this recipe calls for a large amount of water and you don't let it evaporate. This keeps temperatures low. You remove the rendered fat from the water by refrigerating it.

Source of photo: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suet

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on December 06, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Wow! This is extremely helpful. Thank you!

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 06:37 PM

sorry when the marrow is in the bones and you use them to make stock, the fat is naturally rendered by floating to the top.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:22 PM

Yes, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks" as she described it. (I assume Lulu's a she.) You're right, from her description we know that she has rendered this fat. But that's not all she asked about. She also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Those two questions are not about the fat left over from making bone stock. The reason I quoted those two questions was to show you that I was answering those two questions. I wasn't commenting on the bone-stock fat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:33 PM

Yes, you're right, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks" as she put it. (I assume Lulu's a she.) But that's not all she asked about. She also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Those two questions are not about fat from bone stock. The reason I quoted those two questions was to show that I was answering those two questions. I didn't say anything about her bone stock fat because I assume it's full of marrow, hence strongly flavored and highly unsaturated, and I have no idea how to bake with it. Luckily you do know how and you told her. :)

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:24 PM

Yes, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks" as she described it. (I assume Lulu's a she.) You're right, from her description we know that she has rendered this fat. But that's not all she asked about. She also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Those two questions are not about the fat left over from making bone stock. The reason I quoted those two questions was to show that I was answering those two questions. I wasn't commenting on the bone-stock fat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:15 PM

Yes, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks," as he or she described it. But that's not all the original poster asked about. The original poster also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Neither of those questions is about the fat left over from making bone stock. I was answering those two questions, not commenting on the bone-broth fat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 04:32 PM

Welcome! Let us know if you bake stuff and it turns out yummy!

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:29 PM

Yes, you're right, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks" as she described it. (I assume Lulu's a she.) But that's not all she asked about. She also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Those two questions are not about the fat left over from making bone stock. The reason I quoted those two questions was to show that I was answering those two questions. I didn't say anything about the bone stock fat because I assume it's full of marrow, hence strongly flavored and highly polyunsaturated, and I have no idea how to bake with it.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 06:37 PM

I think the OP has the fat from beef bones, not fat cut off from miscellaneous beef parts (say, the ends of ribeye, t-bone, etc.). So, I don't know think the OP needs to render the beef marrow. when you make stock and it's in the bones the marrow, it's pretty much rendered from the stock making.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:30 PM

Yes, you're right, the original poster has rendered fat from bones into "frisbee-sized hunks" as she described it. (I assume Lulu's a she.) But that's not all she asked about. She also asked the two questions that I quoted in my answer. Those two questions are not about fat left over from making bone stock. The reason I quoted those two questions was to show that I was answering those two questions. I didn't say anything about her bone stock fat because I assume it's full of marrow, hence strongly flavored and highly unsaturated, and I have no idea how to bake with it.

3
8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 03:15 PM

so you could try making a savory cake - they do this in france all the time, and you can add ham, cheese, etc.

Also don't be scared of using the beef fat to grease the pan. I imagine you could also make a souffle. There's a recipe for yorkshire pudding which uses flour, eggs, butter and beef fat, but you could use beef or pork fat for the butter/drippings maybe.

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/yorkshire_pudding/

and tapioca flour for the "flour" - I only say that because that recipe looks pretty similar to pao de queijo, brazilian cheese bread. you have to be careful though because tapioca flour can get gummy if not cooked to puff up.

I use beef fat to saute pretty much everything - much cheaper and better tasting than the highly touted and lauded coconut oil. I feel you that there is so much fat at the end!

I've got like 3 cans of beef fat from an overzealous purchase of kidney fat, so I went ahead and tried what you said and I like it. also when i made yorkshire puddings my family went crazy over them, but that was pre-paleo.

perfect health diet, simplyrecipes.com, etc. have recipes for pao de queijo. brazil can't use wheat flour because it goes bad due to the climate, hence the use of tapioca starch - not fully paleo, and yet a good source of starch, per perfecthealthdiet.

good luck!

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 06:30 PM

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/member/views/HAM-MUSHROOM-CHIVE-SAVORY-CLAFOUTIS-1262227 (you could substitute potato starch for the cornstarch, or try coconut flour, but that might overpower the taste)

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 06:32 PM

the only thing is that I don't think the marrow from beef bones has the same melting point.... wikipedia says suet is used to deep fry! Huh! I might try that with my fat.

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on December 06, 2012
at 04:58 PM

This is a great suggestion! I used to (pre-paleo days) make a savory bread with olive oil at the fat and lots of fresh herbs, chunks of manchego and pancetta in it. I wonder if it would work with almond flour?

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:35 PM

Suet (your kidney fat) has the highest melting point of all commonly available animal fats. It's very highly saturated. This make is great for deep frying. Marrow is the opposite. It's liquid at room temperature and highly unsaturated. I'm not much of a cook but I don't think marrow is suitable for frying.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 05:51 PM

so, the recipe from elana's gluten free pantry (paleo bread 2.0) uses coconut and almond flour, a little bit of coconut oil, honey, apple cider vinegar...It's oooook. But if you really wanted a good "bread" that you can add stuff to like cheese and ham and zucchini or spinach or what have you, you would probably have to cheat with gluten free flour mixes...which I can't do, but if you're going to cheat and have gluten sensitivity/fear it, it might be the way to go.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 05:53 PM

the paleo bread 2.0 is pretty dense, so I feel like, not much room for adding stuff. however you could try adding vegetables to the souffle, http://www.foodrenegade.com/creamed-spinach-souffle/ ham and cheese souffle, etc. I personally think a little flour with eggs, (say, a savory clafoutis) would be the way to go with the beef fat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 07:36 PM

Suet (Elf's kidney fat) has the highest melting point of all commonly available animal fats. It's very highly saturated. This is why it's great for deep frying. Marrow is the opposite. It's liquid at room temperature and highly unsaturated. I'm not much of a cook but I don't think marrow is suitable for frying.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 08:03 PM

Oh did I mention I also use this as moisturizer for hands? works great. got the idea from the handmaiden's tale by margaret atwood, where the women use butter.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 08:03 PM

thanks RobS! that's right. Sorry if unclear, i have fat from suet (kidneys) and fat from bones (marrow). I use marrow to saute and suet to bake, but even marrow I used for butter/flavor in baking and greasing the pan. I'm sure it's not the BEST choice, but considering I used to use olive oil or canola oil for those things, I think it's much better, and it's free. If you had health problems or were very concerned about oxidizing fats then you should probably limit it.

1
4498698fa91a620e4ee5b618da71016a

(427)

on December 06, 2012
at 03:38 AM

The fat should keep for awhile if you fridge it. Use it for salad dressing, mix it into mashed starches, etc.

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 03:16 PM

why did someone downgrade this answer? just because he didn't address baking, which is what the quesiton asked?

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 04:44 PM

I don't know, but I upvoted it and yours too.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 06, 2012
at 04:43 PM

I don't know, but I upvoted yours. :)

8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on December 06, 2012
at 06:38 PM

oh paleohacks. thanks RobS!

1
Fce356005a83353009c11567c217a9bd

on December 06, 2012
at 12:35 AM

I recall my folks using baking soda to clean the tallow before using it in baked goods. Not so sure how that process works but I can recall a coconut cake my aunt baked some 30 years ago-it was that good!

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on December 06, 2012
at 10:20 AM

Thanks...I will try to research this.

0
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on December 06, 2012
at 12:45 AM

I would try it with spiced goods first. The flavor will be able to hide.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!