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Ghee vs RAW Butter?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 03, 2011 at 6:34 PM

Which is better for reaching fat burning zone-- Ghee or RAW butter?

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on March 22, 2011
at 12:46 PM

I wasn't reading the study for its population findings, but rather to prove that ghee indeed has oxycholesterol. From the study I posted: "Substantial amounts of cholesterol oxides were found in ghee (12.3% of sterols), but not in fresh butter, by thin-layer and high-performance-liquid chromatography"

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on March 22, 2011
at 08:17 AM

Depends on what your looking for. I'd say Ghee has more fats, simply because you've gotten rid of the water/milk solids. However, you're not going to get to the "fat burning zone" on Ghee or butter alone...

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on March 22, 2011
at 08:15 AM

If your ghee smells rancid, something's wrong with it, definitely toss it. Ghee doesn't smell rancid. I find my Ghee has a richer buttery/nutty smell than the butter it came from.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on March 22, 2011
at 08:10 AM

That "study" abstract from 1987 looks less than worthless to me today. Indian immigrants coming to the West have higher than expected atherosclerosis. They're eating the same Ghee they ate at home... So, did the guy look at the mortality at home? Did he look at their diet here? We know now that paleo populations that eat a SAD diet have higher mortality rates. Could THAT be what's going on instead? Doesn't say in that abstract. Sounds to me he wanted to blame Ghee more than identify a true cause... Note, it was also the start of the height of the "fat/high cholesterol is evil" craze.

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on March 22, 2011
at 12:14 AM

I accidently left the butter out of the fridge on a particularly hot day last week and it clarified beautifully. No cooking needed.

9cfa1ab909f6f89544be665d4ef6e3ea

on March 21, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Ghee is actually cooked more than just clarifying, to the point where it develops a slight nutty brown color.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 04, 2011
at 04:21 PM

Yes casein is the morphine-like drug that exists in butter and not ghee. Who knows what daily consumption of an opiod similar to the one in gluten can cause someone. Invisible damage or not!

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 04, 2011
at 03:27 AM

I think clarified butter = ghee.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on February 03, 2011
at 11:17 PM

Would clarified butter be better? If I understand correctly it's not cooked quite as much as the ghee.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 03, 2011
at 11:15 PM

If you make your own ghee, however, you can add rosemary, oregano, and/or turmeric (all heat stable fat-soluble antioxidants) to the butter BEFORE you boil it and you should largely prevent the formation of cholesterol oxides. Be careful though -- commercial ghees that have herbs added usually add the herbs after cooking is done, with presumably little benefit.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on February 03, 2011
at 10:10 PM

This is interesting....

9055f14c31610afd4d3068ec48eb6d90

(984)

on February 03, 2011
at 10:09 PM

I should have added.. the raw butter is cultured and from grass fed . Not sure if that makes a diff

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8 Answers

5
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 03, 2011
at 07:56 PM

For reaching the "fat burning zone" ghee might be better... but for health and longevity, it's butter for the win.

I would go for butter since ghee has appreciable amounts of oxidized cholesterol, which unlike casein is probably actually bad for you.

EDIT: From experience on this site, I know I will be down voted into oblivion for disagreeing with the herd. So, here's my evidence: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2887%2992443-3/abstract

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 04, 2011
at 03:27 AM

I think clarified butter = ghee.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on February 03, 2011
at 11:17 PM

Would clarified butter be better? If I understand correctly it's not cooked quite as much as the ghee.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 03, 2011
at 11:15 PM

If you make your own ghee, however, you can add rosemary, oregano, and/or turmeric (all heat stable fat-soluble antioxidants) to the butter BEFORE you boil it and you should largely prevent the formation of cholesterol oxides. Be careful though -- commercial ghees that have herbs added usually add the herbs after cooking is done, with presumably little benefit.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on February 03, 2011
at 10:10 PM

This is interesting....

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on March 22, 2011
at 12:14 AM

I accidently left the butter out of the fridge on a particularly hot day last week and it clarified beautifully. No cooking needed.

9cfa1ab909f6f89544be665d4ef6e3ea

on March 21, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Ghee is actually cooked more than just clarifying, to the point where it develops a slight nutty brown color.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on March 22, 2011
at 08:10 AM

That "study" abstract from 1987 looks less than worthless to me today. Indian immigrants coming to the West have higher than expected atherosclerosis. They're eating the same Ghee they ate at home... So, did the guy look at the mortality at home? Did he look at their diet here? We know now that paleo populations that eat a SAD diet have higher mortality rates. Could THAT be what's going on instead? Doesn't say in that abstract. Sounds to me he wanted to blame Ghee more than identify a true cause... Note, it was also the start of the height of the "fat/high cholesterol is evil" craze.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on March 22, 2011
at 12:46 PM

I wasn't reading the study for its population findings, but rather to prove that ghee indeed has oxycholesterol. From the study I posted: "Substantial amounts of cholesterol oxides were found in ghee (12.3% of sterols), but not in fresh butter, by thin-layer and high-performance-liquid chromatography"

1
E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on February 03, 2011
at 07:26 PM

Ghee for sure! Here's a great guide from the whole9 folks: http://whole9life.com/2010/11/butter/

0
A9a54dfd340dcb57e94fdfce0040e6fb

on August 25, 2012
at 07:15 PM

It depends what brand of ghee you use. If you want ghee that doesn't have a bad smell, its best to have it imported from India. Ghee shouldn't smell rancid (the real ghee) but have a buttery smell....

0
D65e16355e3af6781a39549c08eb3da0

on March 21, 2011
at 05:22 PM

I have suspected for a long time that ghee contains oxidized cholesterol, so I was glad to read the Lancet article. I currently have a very expensive, half-used jar of grass fed ghee...which I am going to throw out. Compared to a fresh stick of butter, the smell of ghee is closer to that of a rancid fat. The homemade stuff might not be as processed at the commercial ghee, so less harmful. BTW, my Indian friend says ghee can be properly made ONLY with unsalted, uncultured butter.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on March 22, 2011
at 08:15 AM

If your ghee smells rancid, something's wrong with it, definitely toss it. Ghee doesn't smell rancid. I find my Ghee has a richer buttery/nutty smell than the butter it came from.

0
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 16, 2011
at 06:03 PM

ghee is amazing. don't believe that whole oxidized cholesterol deal. if that were true, cooking eggs in butter would have been a mistake for all these centuries. i just don't buy it.

but i think you should consume plenty of both. first of all, if you are getting raw grass fed butter, it's gotta be from organic pasutres from socal, which is the only company i know that makes it. i had a tub of it in my hand the other day, and i just couldn't justify $12 for one pound when i can get one pound of organic valley's pasture butter for $6. not sure if the 'raw' factor is worth twice the price. but if you do buy the raw, certainly don't make ghee out of it. that would be pretty silly. lol.

0
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 03, 2011
at 07:51 PM

I suspect Ghee is better, since it's got the water and gunk removed and is a purer source of fats. However, in my opinion, unless you're guzzling down bottles of the stuff, you're probably not going to see much of a difference.

9055f14c31610afd4d3068ec48eb6d90

(984)

on February 03, 2011
at 10:09 PM

I should have added.. the raw butter is cultured and from grass fed . Not sure if that makes a diff

0
85ab6fbc5dcbbc6895b892d08a9e2ed9

on February 03, 2011
at 07:23 PM

Ghee is butter with the milk solids removed. I make my own. Def go for Ghee if you can:)

0
209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on February 03, 2011
at 06:48 PM

I would say ghee from grass fed cows because the problematic dairy proteins (casein?) are cooked out, but that's just a guess.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 04, 2011
at 04:21 PM

Yes casein is the morphine-like drug that exists in butter and not ghee. Who knows what daily consumption of an opiod similar to the one in gluten can cause someone. Invisible damage or not!

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