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Butter vs. Cream?

Answered on January 07, 2015
Created October 02, 2013 at 4:41 PM

I just want y'all to outline the pros, cons, and nutritional differences between butter and heavy cream.

Also - creative ways to incorporate these into your diet (e.g. "bulletproof coffee")

Also - good suggestions on where to get unpasteurized or at least non-UHT cream in the South OC would be awesome.

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on October 03, 2013
at 03:28 AM

omg.... silly me. I thought that since it was Organic Valley (from organic pastured raised cows) I didn't need to read the label for additvies but I guess one always need to read the label. I wonder why they go through all the trouble of organic & pasture fed just add something? Actually the stuff is kinda too thick for me. Organicpastures here I come! Thanks for the heads up.

Medium avatar

(624)

on October 03, 2013
at 01:30 AM

I'll just have to investigate my sources of decent cream then, since I like them both and have the opportunity to stir up some butter after work sometimes. I figure that locally I'll have to choose between Sprouts (love it) and WF (avoid it) ... though there is a "Mother's" within about 10 miles I have yet to investigate.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 03, 2013
at 01:14 AM

I think there is very little difference. If one would add 2 tbsp cream, they would probably only add 1 tbsp butter. Cream is about 35% fat, butter (home made) is about 65% fat. So really very little difference. I also would challenge the notion that cream is more expensive. You get about 2.5 lbs of butter from a gallon of cream.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 03, 2013
at 01:10 AM

you can shake it, churn it, or put it in a blender. The left over liquid is butter milk (sort of weird, removing the butter solids from cream creates butter milk). http://www.foodrenegade.com/how-to-make-butter/

Medium avatar

(624)

on October 03, 2013
at 01:05 AM

I beg to differ. While I'm the one asking this question, I know enough off the top of my head to realize that butter is much higher in fat than cream, which contains more water and other milk proteins and milk products. I think CDone is just suggesting I make my own butter. However, cream is usually more expensive and/or highly pasteurized so I'll need some justification to give up my kerrigold.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 03, 2013
at 12:47 AM

ideally try & get a cream that has only a single ingredient ie. cream/milk. if the 'Organic Valley' cream you use is the same stuff i have seen, then it includes a thickener (carrageenan). Although if you can only get creams with thickeners, try & find one with gelatin if possible (just my personal view)

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on October 03, 2013
at 12:14 AM

I think CDone just told you to make butter from the cream. In other words, no difference.

Medium avatar

(624)

on October 02, 2013
at 09:12 PM

Neat... you just mix it? Does this separate the fats from other liquids leaving you with a waste product? Can you use hand mixer (i.e. "egg beaters")?

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6 Answers

0
Medium avatar

(246)

on January 07, 2015
at 01:21 AM

Gram for gram the most nutrient dense cream and butter comes from intensive rotational grazing patured ruminants in the following order-sheep than goats, than jersey cows and last but not least the most common cow; the holstein. I find that cream and butter particularly from the holstein cow breed really does have too many hormones in it because when I did an experiment, following Loren Cordain's lecture on dairy I found out that when I stopped consuming this butter and/or cream my sharp random but constant prostate pains disappeared. I would personally recommend ghee over any of these dairy products because it contains little to no protein which is an endocrine disruptor.

0
Medium avatar

on October 03, 2013
at 01:22 AM

@Cdc12c:

I can't seem to comment still (guess they're still working out bugs I thought were fixed) but....

I just bought this:

http://www.amazon.com/Prince-Lionheart-Versa-Formula-Mixer/dp/B004K4Q9BG/ref=cm_cr_pr_pb_t

It's cheap and I made two cups of coffee so far with butter and that mixer that came out quite nice. I have not yet tried the "bulletproof" mix with coconut cream and butter in a blender, but just putting quality, no-salt-added butter into piping hot coffee and then using that cheap ass hand mixer, I got some pretty tasty results. It's comparable to using cream but obviously not the same since cream is a collide and this is just a frothy mix of fat and water/coffee.

0
4610c234dfda2767451a57501aff983c

on October 02, 2013
at 11:33 PM

I hear that butter is used so much more, but I can't get the same thick creaminess of coffee+cream with butter. If anyone knows how to get a good thick coffee with butter instead of cream (don't want bulletproof) let me know!

9afa79f25d843aa835db15eb0b5b6da1

on January 07, 2015
at 12:45 AM

very late by me but just use a blender

 

0
F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on October 02, 2013
at 11:03 PM

Depends on the heavy cream one is using. I use Organic Valley (from organic pastured raised cows) but it's ultra pasteurized. Per it's nutritional data is has 0g carb & 0g protein so it appears that it would very similar to butter. Other creams will different numbers. When butter is made, either from milk or cream, the fat particles join together to form the solid mass known as butter and the "non-fat" constituents (buttermilk) is the liquid part. The buttermilk has the carbs & the proteins from the milk.

I'm really not sure it's all that important to work heavy cream into ones diet. I use a shot is my single daily / morning cup of coffee.

Occasionally, I'll drop some frozen berries in a few ozs of cream. Not the sort of thing I can do routinely and not put on fat.

http://www.organicpastures.com/

Available at Mother's & Sprouts.... but it's pretty spendy.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 03, 2013
at 12:47 AM

ideally try & get a cream that has only a single ingredient ie. cream/milk. if the 'Organic Valley' cream you use is the same stuff i have seen, then it includes a thickener (carrageenan). Although if you can only get creams with thickeners, try & find one with gelatin if possible (just my personal view)

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on October 02, 2013
at 10:26 PM

Nothing better than crab or lobster dipped in garlic and butter. Price wise it's a splurge for most people. Whipped cream and fruit sounds good.

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 02, 2013
at 05:49 PM

What is really great is to take some fresh cream (raw is best if available), and mix it very vigorously until the cream forms a solid mass of milkfat. Then consume that.

Medium avatar

(624)

on October 02, 2013
at 09:12 PM

Neat... you just mix it? Does this separate the fats from other liquids leaving you with a waste product? Can you use hand mixer (i.e. "egg beaters")?

Medium avatar

(624)

on October 03, 2013
at 01:05 AM

I beg to differ. While I'm the one asking this question, I know enough off the top of my head to realize that butter is much higher in fat than cream, which contains more water and other milk proteins and milk products. I think CDone is just suggesting I make my own butter. However, cream is usually more expensive and/or highly pasteurized so I'll need some justification to give up my kerrigold.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on October 03, 2013
at 12:14 AM

I think CDone just told you to make butter from the cream. In other words, no difference.

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