0

votes

Are the other bad things in milk also in butter?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 09, 2012 at 6:52 PM

I just read the Paleo Answer and was pretty surprised by the long list of bad things in milk that are harmful to the human body. I am not talking about casein or lactose, but the other bioactive hormones, peptides, insulin, estrogen etc. It was not clear in the book whether these other things are also present in butter as nearly every sentence uses the word "milk drinking".

I am looking to reduce my consumption of these substances, but I'm at a loss of what to do about cream/half-and-half in my coffee and butter since these (plus cheese) are the primary ways I consume milk, not actual "milk drinking."

Does anyone know whether butter contains the same troublesome compounds as milk? Any suggestions for coffee creamer?

(Again, not asking about casein and lactose)

[Edit] Because you asked and the list is long:

Growth Hormones

Insulin, Insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), Insulin like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) Insulin like growth factor binding proteins, 1 to 6 (IGFBP-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6), Betacellulin (BTC), Growth hormone (GH), Growth hormone releasing factor (GHRF), Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF ?), Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-?1), (TGF-?2), Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)

Steroid Hormones

Estrogens (Estrone, Estradiol-17?, Estriol and Estrone sulfate), Progesterone, 20 alpha-dihydropregnenolone, 5? androstanedione, 5 ? pregnanedione, 20?- and 20?-dihydroprogesterone, 5?-pregnan-3?-ol-20-one, 5?-androstene-3?17?-diol, 5?-androstan-3?-ol-17-one, androstenedione, testosterone, and DHEA acyl ester

Bioactive Proteins and Peptides

Relaxin, Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), Luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH), Somatostatin (SIH), Gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), Calcitonin, Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), Prolactin, Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), Lysozyme, Lactoperoxidase, Lactoferrin, Transferrin, Immunoglobulins (IgA, IgM, IgG), Proteose-peptone, Glycomacropeptide, Plasmin, ? Casein, ? Casein, ? Casein, ? Lactoglobulin, ? Lactoglobulin, Bovine serum albumen (BSA), Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), Antitrypsin, Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, ?(2) antiplasmin , Butyrophilin, Xanthine oxidase, Mucin-1, Mucin-15, Adipohilin, Fatty acid binding protein, CD36, Periodic acid Schiff 6/7

Bioactive Peptides formed in gut from Milk Proteins

Casomorphins, ? Lactorphin, ? Lactorphin, Lactoferroxins, Casoxins, Casokinins, Casoplatelins, Immunopeptides, Phosphopeptides.

More info here: http://thepaleodiet.com/archives/3816

Medium avatar

(78)

on March 14, 2014
at 09:46 PM

WOW! So are some of the hormones in grass fed butter broken down in the stomach? So if milk causes me acne...will butter maybe not, if I just have a little?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on July 10, 2012
at 10:34 AM

+1000 for the ghee, especially if from grassfed cows milk.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on July 10, 2012
at 10:32 AM

Some hormones, such as estrogen do not break down however, that's why birth control pills are sold as pills, and soy is so dangerous.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 10, 2012
at 03:35 AM

Well, this certainly isn't the first time I've taken issue with one of Loren Cordain's arguments.

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on July 10, 2012
at 01:09 AM

Thank you for the link. That article explains it well. "...dairy proteins like casein and whey do some ugly things in your body, and contain growth factors and immune factors which negatively impact your health. These milk proteins contribute to conditions like cardiovascular disease, cancer and autoimmune diseases, and produce other inflammation-related symptoms..." Clarified, grass-fed butter should be lacking in these things.

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on July 10, 2012
at 01:03 AM

The author of that list was Loren Cordain.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 09, 2012
at 07:19 PM

Perhaps you list these specific "bad things"?

  • F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

    asked by

    (4266)
  • Views
    14.5K
  • Last Activity
    1280D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

11 Answers

best answer

1
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on July 09, 2012
at 08:16 PM

Whole 9 already wrote about this a long time ago: http://whole9life.com/2011/10/butter/

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on July 10, 2012
at 01:09 AM

Thank you for the link. That article explains it well. "...dairy proteins like casein and whey do some ugly things in your body, and contain growth factors and immune factors which negatively impact your health. These milk proteins contribute to conditions like cardiovascular disease, cancer and autoimmune diseases, and produce other inflammation-related symptoms..." Clarified, grass-fed butter should be lacking in these things.

4
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 09, 2012
at 09:32 PM

First off, classifying the entirety of the list items provided as "bad stuff" or "troublesome" doesn't really fly. Some of them may be problematic, but many are not. Lysozyme is an antibacterial compound found naturally in our saliva. Dietary immunoglobulins arguably have some benefits. Same with whey, calcitonin, and lactoferrin; well studied potential benefits.

My immediate thought is that this author is trying to make their case by overwhelming the reader; listing dozens of sciencey sounding things that are inside of your milk! While in reality, many of these things presented as bad may actually be good when consumed. Many may be harmless. And yes, some may be problematic or conditionally problematic, but no apparent attempt at such classification seems to have been made.

The reason I bring this up is that these compounds don't all have the same solubility and binding affinity. Some will be removed when separating out the dairy fat, some will be reduced, and some won't be reduced at all. Individually determining this of each compound would be tedious and unnecessary, so it should be determined which compounds are problematic when consumed in the quantities found in milk. At this point that list will be reduced considerably and it will be easier to say if they're found in butter fat or not.

F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on July 10, 2012
at 01:03 AM

The author of that list was Loren Cordain.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 10, 2012
at 03:35 AM

Well, this certainly isn't the first time I've taken issue with one of Loren Cordain's arguments.

1
58c33847c5b7ecbf6572075df2cdd002

on July 09, 2012
at 07:29 PM

For your coffee try coconut milk or almond milk. Or try it black with cinnamon.

That being said, I am not willing to give up my coffee and the only time I "drink" milk is the grass fed raw milk I put in the coffee.

I do also use ghee for cooking, which, as Alvaro said, has no traces of dairy. You could replace any butter you use with ghee.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on July 10, 2012
at 10:34 AM

+1000 for the ghee, especially if from grassfed cows milk.

1
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on July 09, 2012
at 07:26 PM

Cows that give commercial milk are often given growth hormones. You can find milk products that are labeled "no-growth hormones" or "no bgh". I think most people here who consume dairy stay away from commercial milk products and consume only organic grass-fed. Goat dairy is probably free of excess hormones also, but you would have to check the labeling.

BTW, some hormones break down very quickly in the stomach. For example, insulin. This is why diabetics must take it by injection instead of ingesting a tablet. This site here has some interesting information.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on July 10, 2012
at 10:32 AM

Some hormones, such as estrogen do not break down however, that's why birth control pills are sold as pills, and soy is so dangerous.

1
Medium avatar

(3213)

on July 09, 2012
at 07:22 PM

Clarify your butter if you want to get read of all traces of dairy.

1
1133603ea602c6824da56e8b596c9754

on July 09, 2012
at 07:14 PM

I would think butter contains all the elements of milk because it is made from cream. I think a lot of the harm comes in how the cows are fed and/or medicated, and whether it's been pasteurized. Do you have access to raw grass-fed milk?

0
6fece842bd1bcf5724f458a302a2156e

on April 18, 2014
at 11:56 AM

Milk makes me feel pretty awful and almost ill actually whenever I try it so it's out for me. I have never much liked cheese so don't have that. I do have a bit of butter on spinach which does not seem to affect me in the same way but I would imagine it was better to avoid that too if you can. I don't drink tea and coffee and don't have caffeine.

0
5f2b8e0a671b7eaae8a6bd97f0ded166

(120)

on April 18, 2014
at 10:09 AM

High estrogen content of milk is a concern and it is mostly concentrated in fat.

So butter is pretty high in estrogen. There is progesterone and thyroid in milk to

cancel out the estrogen problem. It is the ratio of estrogen and progesterone

that is important than just the amount of one hormone.

You definitely do not want butter from commercial dairy.

Even the grass fed cows have high estrogen during pregnancy.

This study talks about high estrogen and progesterone in commercial cow's milk.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19496976

0
07842fbab8730403ef284e655083fe0e

(218)

on July 10, 2012
at 11:46 PM

... assuming, of course, the milk in question actually contains the hormones, toxins, pus etc that you believe are in there.

0
E016ea28a90c3df28851e86f4266873e

on July 10, 2012
at 04:07 PM

I agree with the answers above. As butter is made from milk, of course it will contain the hormones, toxins, pus etc thatyou get in cow's milk.

0
Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on July 09, 2012
at 08:32 PM

All milk naturally contains some growth hormone. You are looking for rBGH free, the synthetic. There are commercial milks without. Unless they've changed, Wall Mart, Kroger, Safeway have refused to carry it. Last I knew Deans was rBGH free. Goat has a strong flavor unless it's fresh. Organic is good but expensive. Finding a farmer is an option, if you can do the don't ask/don't tell thing. I've made my own butter from fresh whole Jersey cow milk, but not like everyone can do that. Delicious though.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!