5

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Rotisserie Chicken - How Paleo Is It? (Scale of 1 -10)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 17, 2011 at 2:13 PM

I'm trying to be realistic and rational about this whole paleo thing, which means I have to give up on the idea of eating grass-fed meat at every meal. I've started grabbing a rotisserie chicken once or twice a week when I'm short on time.

I know this is far from ideal, but I was wondering what the general consensus on store bought rotisserie chicken is...

Assuming grassfed meat is a 10, and something like a doughnut is a 1, how paleo is rotisserie chicken? My thoughts: it's basically just meat, protein and fat. That's good. But these store bought chickens are probably injected with all sorts of nasty stuff, and are basically mutant chickens to begin with. So, it loses a point there. And chicken already has a little too much omega 6. Another point down. And, I'm not sure exactly what kind of glaze they use, but I'm sure it's less than ideal...

So, I think I would give it about a 6. Maybe a 7 if you don't eat the skin (but, let's face it, I'm eating the skin...). It's more paleo than not - but you don't want to make it a staple of your diet. Fine once or twice a week.

Thoughts?

00449518f8c762919823012518e19bf5

(0)

on February 26, 2012
at 12:44 AM

I would eat CAFO meat before I had a slice of bread.

0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on December 06, 2011
at 07:20 PM

Nance -- you were so right! I didn't even have to ask -- just finally took the time to read the label on the Giant Eagle birds I've been buying! Despite being labelled "Natural" (as opposed to "Cajun spiced" or "Honey BBQ," etc.), they are also "injected with a solution of up to 10% cane sugar, honey powder..." -- ?!?!??!?!?! So, I guess that's the last time I buy one of those without looking at the ingredients first. At least I know the ones from my organic stores are unadulterated -- but thanks again for the heads up!

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on November 30, 2011
at 07:02 PM

I disagree. If the chicken is seasoned with MSG or some kind of wheat extract that's something I would think any paleo person would like to know. This isn't trying to obtain perfection, it's a legitimate question that could go to the heart of what eating paleo means (regardless of your definition of paleo. We're not talking about a whole food here, asking if it's paleo, we're talking about a commercially prepared product with many ingredients. Wondering if it contains something we all could agree is bad is a good question which this reply doesn't address.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 18, 2011
at 05:27 AM

Glad I'm not the only one who luvs the crispy chicken skin.

0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on November 18, 2011
at 03:46 AM

Thanks, Nance -- now you have me curious. I would like to know.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on November 18, 2011
at 12:04 AM

In a pinch, eat it if it tastes good, just don't build your diet around it.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on November 17, 2011
at 10:08 PM

+1 Well stated.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 17, 2011
at 06:22 PM

I hear ya, but I've seen rotisserie chickens that might actually be worse than an couple McD's burger patties (no bun, no fries.)

0511b69b133556de6e7ef12d4ae262bc

(399)

on November 17, 2011
at 06:07 PM

amen to that!i wouldnt be able to stick with paleo if I couldnt grab SOMETHING in a pinch! It comes down to options for me, which one is better. Obviously like you said, it would be the chicken over the microwavable meal. Thank you for your post!

0511b69b133556de6e7ef12d4ae262bc

(399)

on November 17, 2011
at 06:04 PM

I believe we were talking about in a pinch?? But your recipe sounds great!

Medium avatar

(3259)

on November 17, 2011
at 04:48 PM

Totally agree Nance, but I'm talking "stuck in the middle of nowhere with a choice between McDonald's and a grocery store" kind of decision process. Like I said...once a month AT MOST.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 17, 2011
at 04:17 PM

Albert, ask the store what they inject to keep the birds juicy. Most stores use nasty stuff!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 17, 2011
at 04:17 PM

Rotisserie chickens, unless labeled otherwise, should be assumed to have both industrial oils and refined sugars and probably soy. They used to give me trouble even before I went ancestral, so I think they have lots of bad stuff. Better to buy a plain chicken and cook on the weekend.

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9 Answers

8
698db94d83dee10d6ada8cc0128d45fc

(1048)

on November 17, 2011
at 05:43 PM

I think if you need to even ask this question the whole Paleo concept is getting too difficult.

Its hard enough adhering to this 'life-style' as it is, its definitely doable but requires a lot more effort, truth be told if you want to be real Paleo you should probably quit your job sell all your possessions, go off the grid, buy a small patch of land and live your life in a self sustaining way. That's simply not going to happen for 99% of us.

You need to curtail the principles of Paleo to your specific life style. There are lots of little tweaks you can do to make this even better but I'm hard pressed these days to say that the 80/20 rule (pareto principle) isnt largely in effect here.

Eliminate most processed foods, grains, and sugars and bam your already ahead of the game. Its really freakin simple. Start making it complicated and you probably wont adhere to it for long or your tendency to step out will probably increase.

Perfection is overrated, grab the Rotisserie Chicken and don't feel guilty, if you can get the pastured stuff great but at the end of the day it comes down to Rotisserie Chicken or a microwave meal and eating real food even if its not the best real food you could find is still worlds better than 99% of the stuff in the supermarket.

That's my 2c anyways and its what has helped me get others to ditch their current diet and see miraculous results without having to be hardcore.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on November 17, 2011
at 10:08 PM

+1 Well stated.

0511b69b133556de6e7ef12d4ae262bc

(399)

on November 17, 2011
at 06:07 PM

amen to that!i wouldnt be able to stick with paleo if I couldnt grab SOMETHING in a pinch! It comes down to options for me, which one is better. Obviously like you said, it would be the chicken over the microwavable meal. Thank you for your post!

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on November 30, 2011
at 07:02 PM

I disagree. If the chicken is seasoned with MSG or some kind of wheat extract that's something I would think any paleo person would like to know. This isn't trying to obtain perfection, it's a legitimate question that could go to the heart of what eating paleo means (regardless of your definition of paleo. We're not talking about a whole food here, asking if it's paleo, we're talking about a commercially prepared product with many ingredients. Wondering if it contains something we all could agree is bad is a good question which this reply doesn't address.

00449518f8c762919823012518e19bf5

(0)

on February 26, 2012
at 12:44 AM

I would eat CAFO meat before I had a slice of bread.

8
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 17, 2011
at 02:43 PM

Hi, If I may make a suggestion -- I buy a couple of pounds of legs and thighs (pastured, but they don't have to be), and over the weekend, I roast them on a rack (so the bottom skins get crispy too) with some salt, shoving some butter and garlic cloves under the skins (because it makes for amazing crispy skin) OR I fry them up in rendered lard until crispycrisp.

We pull off the skin, and use it like 'chips' on 'roasting day' (usually Saturday), and enjoy the crispy skin

Then, during the week when we have NO real time to cook, I can just pull out a leg or thigh or a couple of each, stick them in containers to take to work, or eat them for supper.

Super easy, and even the process of roasting them is painless -- prep and in the oven, and an hour later you have chicken.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 18, 2011
at 05:27 AM

Glad I'm not the only one who luvs the crispy chicken skin.

4
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on November 17, 2011
at 02:25 PM

I give them a 7. I'm fine with them in a pinch. Grocery stores nowadays have salad bars also, so you can get the chicken and a salad just as easily as fast food.

The problem with these and other chickens are, of course, they are contaminated with that vile substance known as white meat. I usually eat the legs and thighs first, then save the white meat for scrambled eggs later.

3
Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 17, 2011
at 07:33 PM

I was traveling out of town recently (heading to a wedding) and needed something to eat. Did I know my way around? Nope. Were there any "suitable" restaurants that wouldn't charge me an arm and a leg for a simple piece of meat? No again, try fast food as far as the eye could see.

So, what did I do?

I pulled into a random grocery store, grabbed a rotisserie chicken for ~$6 bucks, and ate about half of it in the parking lot.

The next morning, my breakfast was the other half.

My wife had some too, but this basically broke down into 2 large meals for ~$3 apiece that provided a ton of protein, some fat, and no carbs (remember, I was heading to a wedding, so it's not like I needed any extra carbs).

The ingredients on the label listed some preservatives (sodium phosphate) but no hydrogenated oils or terribly offensive ingredients.

So, in this particular situation, I would give rotisserie chickens a 8 out of 10.

2
Medium avatar

(3259)

on November 17, 2011
at 03:10 PM

3 for health, 6 for paleo convenience. I will also grab a rotisserie chicken in a pinch (once and month, maybe). The main thing I worry about is the oil these things are obviously injected with / bathed in. My gut (literally) tells me it's soybean oil or some other noxious frankenfat.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 17, 2011
at 04:17 PM

Rotisserie chickens, unless labeled otherwise, should be assumed to have both industrial oils and refined sugars and probably soy. They used to give me trouble even before I went ancestral, so I think they have lots of bad stuff. Better to buy a plain chicken and cook on the weekend.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 17, 2011
at 06:22 PM

I hear ya, but I've seen rotisserie chickens that might actually be worse than an couple McD's burger patties (no bun, no fries.)

Medium avatar

(3259)

on November 17, 2011
at 04:48 PM

Totally agree Nance, but I'm talking "stuck in the middle of nowhere with a choice between McDonald's and a grocery store" kind of decision process. Like I said...once a month AT MOST.

2
07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on November 17, 2011
at 02:17 PM

I'd definitely check the ingredients to see what kind of spices they use, in case there's something there you're sensitive to.

But assuming everything else checks out, I'd say it ranks fairly high up there on your arbitrary 10 point scale.

Personally, I'd buy a pastured chicken (they sell them for $1 more/lb at my whole foods) and roast it myself with pastured butter, thyme from my garden, and a nice selection of root vegetables from a farmers market. That would probably rank it higher :)

0511b69b133556de6e7ef12d4ae262bc

(399)

on November 17, 2011
at 06:04 PM

I believe we were talking about in a pinch?? But your recipe sounds great!

1
0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on November 17, 2011
at 03:48 PM

I think a lot of it depends on where you buy the bird, and how it's prepared. I love 'em -- I like chicken, they're already cooked, and where else can you get a few day's worth of meals for $5-7?? As a result, I tend to go through at least one a week -- I just keep it in the fridge and break off chunks for snacks, or lunches on day's when I haven't been able to think/plan ahead.

In my area, I've found wide variation in quality/taste. Earth Fair and Seven Grains have good ones, and I'm most comfortable with their quality (though the Seven Grains bird tends to need seasoning). Heinen's does a good one, as does Giant Eagle, though their provenance is suspect. Birds from the Acme near my house suck, but the one near my office does a good job.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 17, 2011
at 04:17 PM

Albert, ask the store what they inject to keep the birds juicy. Most stores use nasty stuff!

0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on November 18, 2011
at 03:46 AM

Thanks, Nance -- now you have me curious. I would like to know.

0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on December 06, 2011
at 07:20 PM

Nance -- you were so right! I didn't even have to ask -- just finally took the time to read the label on the Giant Eagle birds I've been buying! Despite being labelled "Natural" (as opposed to "Cajun spiced" or "Honey BBQ," etc.), they are also "injected with a solution of up to 10% cane sugar, honey powder..." -- ?!?!??!?!?! So, I guess that's the last time I buy one of those without looking at the ingredients first. At least I know the ones from my organic stores are unadulterated -- but thanks again for the heads up!

0
363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on November 17, 2011
at 07:21 PM

For those who live in NYC Fairway market has organic rotisserie chickens that are not soy fed ... Twice the cost but worth it plus I use the bones to make stock after.

-1
Bd496c213379272a040e2bdd8f8f66bc

on November 17, 2011
at 11:50 PM

I read on Archevore that when faced with what he lovingly calls "factory meat" that Dr. Harris makes sure to pop some omega 3's or a couple of spoons of cod liver oil to offset the dose of omega 6 and calls it a day. As you said, it's not a staple food you're planning on eating 3 times a week, so grab some pork rinds while you're in the grocery store and chow down.

If you're that perplexed by the choice, then just go to McD's and get a quarter pounder meal and chalk it up to being a proper 80/20 moment, or take it as an opportunity to IF til breakfast.

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