2

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Is Yucca/Cassava

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 07, 2011 at 11:58 PM

I have been really getting into tubers these days and I'm wonder what is the stance on cassava.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 17, 2012
at 07:27 PM

Cooking yuca myself, I have not been able to produce anything I wanted to eat a second time. That denseness you mention translates into a texture that I have a great deal of difficulty swallowing, not from a mechanical perspective, but from a "disgust" perspective. Yuca I've had in restaurants (presumably prepared by those who know how to do it well) has been much more enjoyable. I never manage to mess up a potato, however, and grew up on them, so I still prefer potatoes.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 17, 2012
at 07:24 PM

Instead of diverting this question, you should probably just search the PH website--these questions have been discussed ad infinitum previously.

Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on April 15, 2012
at 05:27 AM

Worked in a kitchen in Brazil for a bit. They do amazing things w yucca. Super crispy fries, creamy soups, a kind of a dough for meat dumplings or fritters. It is very versatile. Instead of mashed yucca, we'd purée it in a blender w salt, butter, broth. It's stickier than potatoes for sure, but soaks up flavors like crazy.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:11 PM

I agree, it's good stuff. Have you ever tried using cassava flour for baking?

691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on March 09, 2011
at 04:16 AM

delicious. especially mashed with garlic

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on March 08, 2011
at 02:31 PM

Saponin and phytoestrogen heavy.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 08, 2011
at 09:41 AM

I think everyone has a different take on how this. I personally am not into obsessing over the nutritional details of this or that, sticking mainly to foods that are available and leaning more towards ones that my direct ancestors would have eaten - rotating my choices of tuber a lot. I'd eat yucca very rarely myself.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 08, 2011
at 02:45 AM

Matt mentioned them but didn't address them. He just briefly said the words lectins, phytates, phytic acid and saponins and then rattled off some biochem about celiacs. Nothing more than that.

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8 Answers

best answer

14
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 08, 2011
at 03:03 AM

:( people, whether or not something is paleo or not has absolutely nothing to do with the presence of food toxins or whether or not it can only be consumed cooked. There is ample evidence that early humans ate foods with ample amounts of toxins like cycads, as well as those that are only digestible through cooking. Contrast that with the fact that there is NO evidence that paleolithic people ate coconut, does that mean that's out??

But as Lalonde said, paleo isn't about figuring out what ancient paleolithic people ate, but using evolution to discover facts about optimal nutrition.

Besides that, some types of cassava are edible raw. I don't eat it often, but it absorbs sauces quite nicely. Mainstream? Cassava is one of the most popular crops in the world and is eaten by major ethnic groups as well as many foraging tribes.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on March 08, 2011
at 09:41 AM

I think everyone has a different take on how this. I personally am not into obsessing over the nutritional details of this or that, sticking mainly to foods that are available and leaning more towards ones that my direct ancestors would have eaten - rotating my choices of tuber a lot. I'd eat yucca very rarely myself.

3
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 08, 2011
at 02:37 AM

saponins are not friendly to zonulins in the intestine. They cause a lot of leaky gut issues. I think Matt Lalonde just spoke about them on Wolf's last podcast. And they also have a lot of steroid like effects that effect hormonal response in the gut. Not sure I can advocate them until we see some more data since they are becoming more main stream

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 08, 2011
at 02:45 AM

Matt mentioned them but didn't address them. He just briefly said the words lectins, phytates, phytic acid and saponins and then rattled off some biochem about celiacs. Nothing more than that.

1
39839774ec8e7048825411e0cc6d8ba3

(10)

on October 13, 2012
at 02:13 PM

Well, being Brazilian, I am mostly interested in doing stuff with mandioca, which is how we call it. You can't put it though a food processor, unless wuth broth to make a creamy soup. If you want a pur??e, you have to mash it, otherwise it acquires a glue-like texture.

It is possible to make gnocchi with the cooked, mashed cassava, no need to add flour.

Peel (not only the brown skin, but the first white layer too), put on a pressure cooker for 10 -25 minutes, let it loose pressure on its own. Add salt, butter, enjoy =] Cooking time depends on a variety of factors. Old roots take more time, sometimes don't even cook. Throw away. The younger the roots, the quicker they cook.

Put a layer of the mashed mandioca on a glass ovenware (forgot the name) over a bit of butter/oil. Put over a layer of seasoned, cooked minced meat or shreded, (cooked and saut??ed with onions) jerky, thick tomato sauce add another layer of mashed mandioca and sprinkle with some almond slices/broken cashews. That is a paleo version of Torta Madalena (Madeleine Pie - with minced meat) or Escondidinho (Hidden surpride - awful translation -- with beef jerky)

You can also do that with potatoes.

1
3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

on May 09, 2011
at 02:33 PM

I am probably the biggest booster of yuca (not yucca). I can't see how you can go back to eating potatoes after having tasted yuca. Much creamier, denser, and filling. Seems to have higher GLs than potatoes. You have to have it heated up. Can't eat it cold. Try some hot pepper sauce (Frank's) or gluten-free soy sauce. For some of us, it's de riguer when eating steak or pork chops.

Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:11 PM

I agree, it's good stuff. Have you ever tried using cassava flour for baking?

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 17, 2012
at 07:27 PM

Cooking yuca myself, I have not been able to produce anything I wanted to eat a second time. That denseness you mention translates into a texture that I have a great deal of difficulty swallowing, not from a mechanical perspective, but from a "disgust" perspective. Yuca I've had in restaurants (presumably prepared by those who know how to do it well) has been much more enjoyable. I never manage to mess up a potato, however, and grew up on them, so I still prefer potatoes.

1
Eeb593d6b6d7a939fdd5469b69347d5f

(1037)

on May 09, 2011
at 04:42 AM

"Cassava is fine. One deal with cassava though, and this isn???t to get people to not eat it, but it can be a goitrogen, similar to cruciferous vegetables. So this is that argument for variety again. Mix it up. Do some cassava for maybe a week or a day or two here and there, and then mix it up. A goitrogen is something that can block iodine metabolism or block different elements of thyroid metabolism and can cause some thyroid disregulation. So that would be my only caveat with that." - Robb Wolf

Sounds ok to me.

0
954d0979a560b105cf197d8d7a788ae0

on August 17, 2012
at 07:18 PM

I don't have an answer but a question. Is manioc and sweet potatoes Paleo? Why?

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 17, 2012
at 07:24 PM

Instead of diverting this question, you should probably just search the PH website--these questions have been discussed ad infinitum previously.

0
083f1759ac6bcee7cd5081f6d062c822

on May 09, 2011
at 06:02 AM

From a chef perspective...not a big fan of yucca. It's texture is difficult to make appealing. I have pulled off yucca fries pretty well however. Mashed yucca is a tough sell. Texture is like something I would use to put up dry wall

Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on April 15, 2012
at 05:27 AM

Worked in a kitchen in Brazil for a bit. They do amazing things w yucca. Super crispy fries, creamy soups, a kind of a dough for meat dumplings or fritters. It is very versatile. Instead of mashed yucca, we'd purée it in a blender w salt, butter, broth. It's stickier than potatoes for sure, but soaks up flavors like crazy.

0
D5f3a9235c2aca632eb4aaca5e85f092

on March 08, 2011
at 12:40 AM

It works well and has many different uses after a bit of processing and has the pro of not being a grain.

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