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Bulletproof Omega-6 confusion

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 19, 2012 at 12:49 AM

Asprey says stay away from Omega-6 acids, but I find that coconut, eggs, and avocado are all sources.

Can anybody clear this up for me? Sorry if it's common sense I'm just overlooking.

If you just want to debate Bulletproof please don't bother. Not what I'm looking for.

Thank you.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 19, 2012
at 12:31 PM

I don't buy the 4% maximum often proposed. I don't know how nutritionism came up with such a number, perhaps it is based on modern consumption of refined vegetable oils. Certainly doesn't seem natural or evolutionary inspired, as PUFAs are everywhere in nature.

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3 Answers

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1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 19, 2012
at 06:39 AM

Keep in mind Dave Asprey is a salesman not a clinician.

That said if you are on a ketogenic or near-ketogenic diet, like Asprey suggests, Omega 6 aren't quite the issues they are with higher-carb diets.

2
74786bbe8254844304a33943290c4d6d

on November 19, 2012
at 01:41 AM

Chris Kresser says O6 from sources like chicken, pork, avocado is absolutely okay.

"Avoiding industrial seed oils rich in omega-6 fatty acids can also help reduce inflammatory skin conditions; however, I have found in my clinical practice that limiting intake of omega-6 from whole foods like avocados, poultry, pork and nuts is usually not necessary."

It's from a post on skin-health, but I was relieved. I eat a whole avocado almost daily.

http://chriskresser.com/nutrition-for-healthy-skin-part-2

0
79fc447191de75e7c178951594a43f13

(448)

on November 19, 2012
at 06:36 AM

One guideline is to run total omega 6 consumption under 4% of calories. So be somewhat wary of foods with higher than 4% omega 6 of calories. This includes pork, avocado, olive oil and most nuts. (but not coconut or coconut oil which is about 2%)

The way to tell if this is an issue for you is to watch how you feel after your consumption of meals higher in omega 6 vs meals lower in omega 6. If you don't feel any difference, it isn't a problem. If you feel worse, it is a problem. Use nutritiondata.com to figure out omega 6 content of foods. NB: pork and lard have actual omega 6 content higher than indicated on nutritiondata.com

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 19, 2012
at 12:31 PM

I don't buy the 4% maximum often proposed. I don't know how nutritionism came up with such a number, perhaps it is based on modern consumption of refined vegetable oils. Certainly doesn't seem natural or evolutionary inspired, as PUFAs are everywhere in nature.

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