11

votes

Would you eat a cricket?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 17, 2011 at 4:21 PM

Hey guys, I'm sitting here outside the public library, using the wi-fi with my iPad, and about two minutes ago something crawled under my foot, and I picked it up and popped it in my mouth. Guess what it was. Hint: it goes "chirp chirp chirp".

I've been meaning to do this all season, finally I work up the nerve at season's end. Kinda disappointed in myself, but anyway, I did it!

BTW, thet taste kinda bland, nothing gross at all, but not tasty. I had heard that you should pull the legs off or they get stuck in your teeth, but I didn't do that and didn't have a problem. Altogether, a pretty tender little morsel.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on May 27, 2013
at 02:53 AM

Ha! I just realized I answered this in 2011. Congrats, Past January, we ate bugs and found it okay.

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on February 07, 2012
at 05:23 PM

Looks yummy ;-) http://www.flickr.com/photos/technobohemian/386275388/

Df37dee1b45f564770863d8a74016cbe

(1035)

on October 18, 2011
at 08:08 PM

Yield hugely depends upon dedication for keeping the conditions optimal. I'm pretty casual, so my yields I'm sure are lower. I'd say, if you were diligent about keeping the farm consistently warm, with plenty of moisture sources and deep bedding, if you started with young beetles you could get your first offspring hatched and to a mature larvae stage in 3 months. If you start with larvae, it may be a few more weeks to grow them into adults for breeding. A female adult can lay between 300-500 eggs before she dies. Humidity and warmth are key for successful egg hatches.

525cac40f08043be58ce67c734459969

(200)

on October 18, 2011
at 11:45 AM

In the UK there is an advert on TV for HSBC bank (trying to show how global they are), where a South East Asian farmer collects the bugs, spears them on a stick, deep-fries them and serves them to a little girl. The girl looks horrified until he adds seasoning and only then does she tuck in to her tasty snack. So fried with salt, is the way to go.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 18, 2011
at 06:46 AM

What kind of yield are we talking about with what time frame?

Df37dee1b45f564770863d8a74016cbe

(1035)

on October 18, 2011
at 04:01 AM

Wheat germ is too expensive for bedding and goes rancid too quickly IMO. I use wheat bran for their bedding (which is also their main food), and rolled oatmeal or cornmeal when I don't have bran handy. You could use oat bran, too. I was hesitant for a long time, but really it's too easy. Started my mealie farm in 2009, and going strong ever since. Whenever you want to "slow things down" you can keep them in a cooler environment ... like garage or basement and growth rate really slows down.

Df37dee1b45f564770863d8a74016cbe

(1035)

on October 18, 2011
at 03:53 AM

Sometimes I give them a kale leaf or two, from our garden. If they eat it, that supposedly gives them the calcium needed, for feeding to the hens. You can also use raw potatoes (instead of apples or carrots) I notice that my mealies like me rotating the moisture thingy. They like variety, lol.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 18, 2011
at 03:10 AM

^what's your point of saying that? That just says something went in one ear and out the other.

78fcdeee6ac4ee7d071bbac56b9e359f

(1025)

on October 18, 2011
at 02:07 AM

Probably the stem part at least, mine love cabbage. Oh and I meant to say I feed them wheat germ, not wheat bran...I don't know what all these wheat things are.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on October 18, 2011
at 01:17 AM

bugs are easy...but baby birds, omg, what an image! yet, it's really the same thing; something we're not used to eating.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on October 18, 2011
at 01:13 AM

Edward -- I wish I'd had a teacher that bold. Bugs are super protein paks. Or, I'm whacked. :)

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on October 18, 2011
at 01:12 AM

LOL! Awesome, Huey! I have eaten bugs that invaded my space. Only fair...

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 17, 2011
at 11:36 PM

Wow, this is really tempting. I wonder what we could do to increase the mineral content of them? Would they eat spinach?

78fcdeee6ac4ee7d071bbac56b9e359f

(1025)

on October 17, 2011
at 10:57 PM

Yep, what Meg said. I feed mine rolled oats, wheat bran and brewer's yeast. It's almost too easy (I forget about them sometimes and they're always fine). They taste even better when cooked on the skillet in your fat of choice.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6244)

on October 17, 2011
at 10:51 PM

LOL! I thought so too - then thought it weird it didn't try to fly away! Relieved nevertheless!

E46c729d18071082805378654a2020c5

(186)

on October 17, 2011
at 09:36 PM

Now that I actually think about it, it is an extension of the corn lobby...we're all done for.

Df37dee1b45f564770863d8a74016cbe

(1035)

on October 17, 2011
at 09:17 PM

I raise mealies for my chickens, but I've eaten them raw/alive sometimes too. Even had some guests from Australia eat them alive. They taste bland, fatty, gooey, not bad. Travis, it's extremely easy to do. Get a wide tub made of plastic, deep enough to hold a couple inches of bran. Purchase a small container of regular-size(not giant) mealies from the pet store. Dump them in, and put some carrots or apple slices on top, for moisture. I've raised 7 generations mealies from my 1st purchase - gonna start roaches, next. Here's a mealworm link: http://www.sialis.org/raisingmealworms.htm

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 17, 2011
at 08:36 PM

That's what I thought at first too!

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 17, 2011
at 07:59 PM

Dunnie: Any tips for the aspiring mealworm farmer?

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 17, 2011
at 07:10 PM

we been told!..

78fcdeee6ac4ee7d071bbac56b9e359f

(1025)

on October 17, 2011
at 07:01 PM

I raise meal worms! They're yummy, and it's ok when they turn into beetles cause the beetles just make more baby meal worms.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:25 PM

Go to a feed store. You can get freeze dried meal worms made for chickens.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:20 PM

Yeah, meal worms would be perfect, but you'd have to watch the timing or they would turn into beetles.

Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

(13635)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:17 PM

I've had them sautéed in a wok with peanut oil and they were pretty good. Coconut oil would be great.

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:11 PM

Lol! That's what I thought too! It was going to be like the whole Ozzy Osbourne bat eating incident all over again :P

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:03 PM

Visit your local bait shop. I hear meal worms are great. I bought some white corn meal intending to start a colony myself, but haven't gotten around to it. Maybe now I will.

Ef2f6c723983d7fe7a06bd57af6adeed

(1725)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:46 PM

That's awesome!

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Hmm, wonder how they'd taste if roasted in butter and salt?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:22 PM

Wouldn't mind trying some, I'll go with cooked ones if I do though :P

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:21 PM

Wouldn't mind trying some, I'll go with cooked if I do though :P

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on October 17, 2011
at 04:55 PM

At the boyscouts, I drank water from the river, ate damn fatty, was constantly in the sun, but this is the one thing I just wasn't able to do yet. I think I'd try it now, especially because I had a friend who collected crickets and ate them cooked. He said it tasted like potato chips (I adore chips).

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 17, 2011
at 04:43 PM

copied from http://www.manataka.org/page160.html 100 grams of cricket contains: 121 calories, 12.9 grams of protein, 5.5 g. of fat, 5.1 g. of carbohydrates, 75.8 mg. calcium, 185.3 mg. of phosphorous, 9.5 mg. of iron, 0.36 mg. of thiamin, 1.09 mg. of riboflavin, and 3.10 mg. of niacin.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 17, 2011
at 04:39 PM

When I was a kid I used to kick open rotting logs and snack on grubs. A biology teacher showed me how to do it.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 17, 2011
at 04:38 PM

Oh, thank goodness, the sidewalk! The whole time I was thinking you went for one of those jay walking crickets. They're dirty.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on October 17, 2011
at 04:33 PM

Not off the street! Off the sidewalk! Whaddaya think I'm uncouth or something?

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 17, 2011
at 04:32 PM

You picked a cricket up off the street and ate it????

  • 93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

    asked by

    (2936)
  • Views
    2.5K
  • Last Activity
    1285D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

20 Answers

14
B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 17, 2011
at 04:36 PM

As God is my witness, I'll never be hungry again

13
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 17, 2011
at 04:44 PM

facepalm As if Paleo folks weren't considered weird already...

12
Medium avatar

(3024)

on October 17, 2011
at 04:44 PM

One part of me is saying good for you, but the other 97% or me is saying ewwwwwwww!

8
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 17, 2011
at 07:06 PM

Wow. My opinion is that people's response here are Societal driven responses that are not productive. I think insects are a missing part of our diet and we'd probably be more successful and happy in life if we ate insects. This isn't gross at all. What's gross is that all you humans are eating grass on a daily basis thinking it's something called pizza.

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 17, 2011
at 07:10 PM

we been told!..

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 18, 2011
at 03:10 AM

^what's your point of saying that? That just says something went in one ear and out the other.

6
E46c729d18071082805378654a2020c5

(186)

on October 17, 2011
at 07:57 PM

Did you even check to see if it was an organic cricket? There could have been hidden sugars all over that thing. ;)

6
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on October 17, 2011
at 04:45 PM

If this catches on I'll bet they'll try to outlaw it due to heavy influence from the popcorn lobby.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on October 17, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Hmm, wonder how they'd taste if roasted in butter and salt?

Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

(13635)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:17 PM

I've had them sautéed in a wok with peanut oil and they were pretty good. Coconut oil would be great.

E46c729d18071082805378654a2020c5

(186)

on October 17, 2011
at 09:36 PM

Now that I actually think about it, it is an extension of the corn lobby...we're all done for.

4
B58511bcd1ecc0dd4ad8130859513c81

on October 17, 2011
at 05:14 PM

When u said chirp chirp, I was thinking you meant a baby bird... Oh thank goodness I was wrong!

Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on October 17, 2011
at 08:36 PM

That's what I thought at first too!

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6244)

on October 17, 2011
at 10:51 PM

LOL! I thought so too - then thought it weird it didn't try to fly away! Relieved nevertheless!

Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:11 PM

Lol! That's what I thought too! It was going to be like the whole Ozzy Osbourne bat eating incident all over again :P

4
Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on October 17, 2011
at 05:09 PM

If the world catches on to your shining example, we'll all be better off!

http://euobserver.com/1017/113602

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1810336,00.html

would-you-eat-a-cricket?

3
Medium avatar

on October 17, 2011
at 05:58 PM

I've actually been thinking for the last few days that if we fed grain to insects and either fed the insects to chickens or ate them directly, we as a nation would be so much better off. There'd be an energy loss of course, but a huge nutrition gain. I guess the same would go for feeding it to granivorous rodents and then eating them....

That being said, I probably wouldn't make a habit of that, OP, though I did do that with tiny crabs as a kid. Problem being that it was the New Jersey shore. I'm not sure which is worse.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:20 PM

Yeah, meal worms would be perfect, but you'd have to watch the timing or they would turn into beetles.

78fcdeee6ac4ee7d071bbac56b9e359f

(1025)

on October 17, 2011
at 07:01 PM

I raise meal worms! They're yummy, and it's ok when they turn into beetles cause the beetles just make more baby meal worms.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:25 PM

Go to a feed store. You can get freeze dried meal worms made for chickens.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 17, 2011
at 07:59 PM

Dunnie: Any tips for the aspiring mealworm farmer?

Df37dee1b45f564770863d8a74016cbe

(1035)

on October 18, 2011
at 04:01 AM

Wheat germ is too expensive for bedding and goes rancid too quickly IMO. I use wheat bran for their bedding (which is also their main food), and rolled oatmeal or cornmeal when I don't have bran handy. You could use oat bran, too. I was hesitant for a long time, but really it's too easy. Started my mealie farm in 2009, and going strong ever since. Whenever you want to "slow things down" you can keep them in a cooler environment ... like garage or basement and growth rate really slows down.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:03 PM

Visit your local bait shop. I hear meal worms are great. I bought some white corn meal intending to start a colony myself, but haven't gotten around to it. Maybe now I will.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 18, 2011
at 06:46 AM

What kind of yield are we talking about with what time frame?

78fcdeee6ac4ee7d071bbac56b9e359f

(1025)

on October 17, 2011
at 10:57 PM

Yep, what Meg said. I feed mine rolled oats, wheat bran and brewer's yeast. It's almost too easy (I forget about them sometimes and they're always fine). They taste even better when cooked on the skillet in your fat of choice.

78fcdeee6ac4ee7d071bbac56b9e359f

(1025)

on October 18, 2011
at 02:07 AM

Probably the stem part at least, mine love cabbage. Oh and I meant to say I feed them wheat germ, not wheat bran...I don't know what all these wheat things are.

Df37dee1b45f564770863d8a74016cbe

(1035)

on October 18, 2011
at 03:53 AM

Sometimes I give them a kale leaf or two, from our garden. If they eat it, that supposedly gives them the calcium needed, for feeding to the hens. You can also use raw potatoes (instead of apples or carrots) I notice that my mealies like me rotating the moisture thingy. They like variety, lol.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 17, 2011
at 11:36 PM

Wow, this is really tempting. I wonder what we could do to increase the mineral content of them? Would they eat spinach?

Df37dee1b45f564770863d8a74016cbe

(1035)

on October 17, 2011
at 09:17 PM

I raise mealies for my chickens, but I've eaten them raw/alive sometimes too. Even had some guests from Australia eat them alive. They taste bland, fatty, gooey, not bad. Travis, it's extremely easy to do. Get a wide tub made of plastic, deep enough to hold a couple inches of bran. Purchase a small container of regular-size(not giant) mealies from the pet store. Dump them in, and put some carrots or apple slices on top, for moisture. I've raised 7 generations mealies from my 1st purchase - gonna start roaches, next. Here's a mealworm link: http://www.sialis.org/raisingmealworms.htm

Df37dee1b45f564770863d8a74016cbe

(1035)

on October 18, 2011
at 08:08 PM

Yield hugely depends upon dedication for keeping the conditions optimal. I'm pretty casual, so my yields I'm sure are lower. I'd say, if you were diligent about keeping the farm consistently warm, with plenty of moisture sources and deep bedding, if you started with young beetles you could get your first offspring hatched and to a mature larvae stage in 3 months. If you start with larvae, it may be a few more weeks to grow them into adults for breeding. A female adult can lay between 300-500 eggs before she dies. Humidity and warmth are key for successful egg hatches.

2
E95216c62a14d21c371fcbf2fed8469b

(1867)

on October 18, 2011
at 04:54 AM

I live in a civilised country (for now). I'll resort to eating crickets when the zombies come. Until then, I'm bowhunting deer.

2
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on October 17, 2011
at 10:13 PM

I have eaten most things that swim, crawl, walk or fly including grasshoppers, crickets, grubs, ants, bees and caterpillars(roasted they taste like hazel nuts) mmmmmmmm.

High 5 @ Huey!

2
61a27a8b7ec2264b1821923b271eaf54

(3175)

on October 17, 2011
at 06:18 PM

I used to eat them when I was stationed in Korea. They were served as bar snacks. They were dried, and had some sort of spices (soy sauce?) on them. Very tasty indeed. Never tried a live, wet one.

1
5b4fd1d0dcb02b1cc3c666ece9e5983d

(1169)

on October 18, 2011
at 07:07 AM

Crickets, or chapolins are a common Oaxacan snack. Oaxaca is in Mexico. They are fried (hopefully in lard) and there is a restaurant in Fullerton, California that serves them, its close to the barrio where I was raised and my brother still lives. Sooner or later I'll eat there and report back.

I think you should apply some cooking to them though - offal is "in" among foodies - a matter of time before insects get picked up too. Here is a ChowHound thread on crickets.

Lets be ahead of the gourmet curve.

1
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on October 17, 2011
at 11:47 PM

I opened this expecting to find a confession over having eaten a Hostess Ho Ho or the like so color me surprised on this one.

Yeah, I don't know dude. That's pretty gross (but add my name to the list of people desperately relieved it wasn't a freaking baby bird.)

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on October 18, 2011
at 01:17 AM

bugs are easy...but baby birds, omg, what an image! yet, it's really the same thing; something we're not used to eating.

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on February 07, 2012
at 05:23 PM

Looks yummy ;-) http://www.flickr.com/photos/technobohemian/386275388/

0
Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on May 27, 2013
at 02:52 AM

I recently ate crickets, grasshoppers, and mealworms at a bug festival. They were all interesting. I could see getting used to them. The crickets and grasshoppers were dry roasted and didn't taste like much; kind of A dry, crunchy, popcorn-like experience. The mealworms were pan fried with sugar. They tasted kinda strange -- like nothing else I've ever eaten.

I could adjust to eating them regularly if I had no pork chop options. :)

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on May 27, 2013
at 02:53 AM

Ha! I just realized I answered this in 2011. Congrats, Past January, we ate bugs and found it okay.

0
5cb72179fcddcee6a6b570dc80269a1a

(78)

on May 26, 2013
at 05:10 PM

Yes, I would eat a cricket.

Thing is, I'm concerned that the crickets or other insects have been fed a poor diet or contaminated by environmental pollutants. Otherwise I would go to town. I don't care how they taste. Our bodies probably thrived on them. It's only now that we have chicken McNuggets, Pop Tarts and Round Table that it all seems so yucky in comparison. And.... it is. In comparison.

But it is not yucky.

If anybody knows where I can find organic insects to eat, please lemme know:)

0
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 23, 2011
at 07:39 PM

Nope. I would not. But my cat likes to eat them.

0
5b69a02dadcae753771921d913909215

(1457)

on October 18, 2011
at 01:25 AM

Would just be worried about pesticides. I have eaten a lot of ants... that's about it though.

If I knew it wasn't contaminated I wouldn't hesitate. All of that stuff is in most food already just chopped up beyond recognition.

0
Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on October 18, 2011
at 01:11 AM

I would totally eat a cricket. Grasshoppers too, grilled, on a stick. ;)

You don't have to be Paleo to enjoy insects. Many cultures do. We're just acculturated against it in the West. They're dense little packets of protein and fat. And in any starvation situation, you can bet your burger you'll eat bugs!

0
5b8487b518f0f219554526b32c30c531

on October 17, 2011
at 06:17 PM

LOL at this. Eating insects?

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!