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Preparing Buckwheat?

Answered on November 03, 2013
Created November 02, 2013 at 1:58 AM

Hey guys,

So I'm thinking about trying buckwheat (thanks to daz's suggestion in my other thread). I am in a college environment, the best I can really do is soak overnight. Will that get rid of most of the phytic acid?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 03, 2013
at 12:41 PM

I do too- I think some people were a bit too concerned about it a while ago. The sourness of the buckwheat after soaking and fermenting it is what keeps me soaking it. There are worse things than phytic acid in food (and things that don't have probable positive effects...)

Medium avatar

(238)

on November 02, 2013
at 04:50 PM

I've never soaked buckwheat, although a shorter soak would be called for due to the phytase. I've used it to soak oats because of the phytase in BW. When I did eat BW, I just cooked it straight up, no soak at all. I think the phytic thing is overblown.

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3 Answers

0
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 03, 2013
at 12:19 PM

I am sorry I do not know how to reduce phytic acid, but I know how to make buckweat that is the best in the world. Just follow my instructions.

1. Buy roasted buckwheat.

2. Measure two cups of buckwheat. Pour in a big bowl, add tons of water, wiggle, rinse. Repeat till the water is clear.

3. Place rinsed buckwheat in a heavy-duty pot. Add three cups of water and a pinch of salt.

4. Bring water to the boil and keep heat at medium high till the water is absorbed from the top. You can boil it with the lid open or closed, as long as you can see when all the water from the top gets absorbed.

5. Turn the heat all the way down to the lowest setting. Close the lid and leave it on the stove for 25 - 45 minutes. Time vary due to the pot material.

6. Your buckwheat is ready when all the water is absorbed from the bottom. You cannot really burn it at the lowest setting.

7. Turn off the stove.

8. When serving, add fried onions, mushrooms, raw tomatoes, butter or olive oil. Enjoy!

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4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on November 03, 2013
at 08:37 AM

I occasionally mix buckwheat flour with kefir and leave it overnight. The fermentation needs to be seen to be believed! Then, with a beaten egg mixed in, salt and enough milk to make a batter, it makes good pancakes (crepes).

0
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on November 02, 2013
at 02:27 PM

Yes, as it is very high in phytase. You could go longer if you want and if you like a slightly sour ( fermented) taste... That will maximise phytic acid reduction.

In a nutrient dense diet though I wouldn't be too concerned about the phytic acid.

Medium avatar

(238)

on November 02, 2013
at 04:50 PM

I've never soaked buckwheat, although a shorter soak would be called for due to the phytase. I've used it to soak oats because of the phytase in BW. When I did eat BW, I just cooked it straight up, no soak at all. I think the phytic thing is overblown.

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