0

votes

Why might brocolli be bad for you?

Commented on March 22, 2014
Created March 21, 2014 at 4:35 AM

Now I am not even close to obsessive about my diet, I don't even often think about it, TBH. I have cheats, don't obsess about omegas, anti-nutrients, anything diet. But I eat a lot of brocolli, and I had this weird dream, totally out of the blue, that said "you shouldn't eat brocolli, its bad for you", lol! Im not aware of anyone that says this, and the thought never occured to me once.

Now ignoring the wishy-washy source of my question....what are the possible reasons brocolli might be bad for you? This is one of the only place I could think of that might have answers to that question, so I hope you can give me some allowance, and try to think of nutritional, phytochemical or other reasons why brocolli might be bad?

Look its weird I know! Quite probably absurd, lol. But ignoring the source, what could be "wrong" with brocolli?

8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

(70)

on March 22, 2014
at 02:48 AM

Not really true. These so called "goitrogens" actually don't cause hypothyroid per say, they instead eliminate the digestion of iodine, similar to how anti-nutrients remove minerals from digestion. So if one were eating them all the time, healthy or unhealthy, it would lower your iodine levels.

8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

(70)

on March 22, 2014
at 02:46 AM

I tend to agree that one should not have too much of one food. I have basically been eating brocolli daily. From a polyphenol point of view, you'd be overdoing particular genotoxins. From a fodmaps pov, you'd have too many indigestibles. From a goitergenic pov you'd be lowering your iodine absorbtion. If you've low blood pressure (which I think I may have posturally, seeing doctor tuesday), things like brocolli lower BP. And if that ruminant study I posted is relevant to humans (may or may not be), it may also effect your blood cells. So there are ways in which you might have too much

8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

(70)

on March 21, 2014
at 07:17 AM

Do humans produce dimethyl disulphide from brassica vegetables? Now if that was the case, it might be a good reason to avoid excess brassica...

8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

(70)

on March 21, 2014
at 07:15 AM

This - http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02291432#page-1 is the only thing ive found appart from the FODMAPs and goitergen issues, and I am not sure if this applies to humans or not.

  • 8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

    asked by

    (70)
  • Views
    1.9K
  • Last Activity
    1580D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

0
8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

(70)

on March 21, 2014
at 11:28 PM

So what about this? Do humans produce dimethyl disulphide from brassica vegetables?

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02291432#page-1

0
8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

(70)

on March 21, 2014
at 11:27 PM

So what about this? Do humans produce dimethyl disulphide from brassica vegetables?

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02291432#page-1

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on March 21, 2014
at 03:23 PM

"Broccoli is sometimes referred to as a "goitrogenic" food. Yet, contrary to popular belief, according to the latest studies, foods themselves—broccoli included—are not "goitrogenic" in the sense of causing goiter whenever they are consumed, or even when they are consumed in excess. In fact, most foods that are commonly called "goitrogenic"—such as the cruciferous vegetables (including broccoli, kale, and cauliflower) and soyfoods—do not interfere with thyroid function in healthy persons even when they are consumed on a daily basis. Nor is it scientifically correct to say that foods "contain goitrogens," at least not if you are thinking about goitrogens as a category of substances like proteins, carbohydrates, or vitamins. With respect to the health of our thyroid gland, all that can be contained in a food are nutrients that provide us with a variety of health benefits but which, under certain circumstances, can also interfere with thyroid function. The term "goitrogenic food" makes it sound as if something is wrong with the food, but that is simply not the case. What causes problems for certain individuals is not the food itself but the mismatched nature of certain substances within the food to their unique health circumstances. For more, see an An Up-to-Date Look at Goitrogenic Substances in Food."

8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

(70)

on March 22, 2014
at 02:48 AM

Not really true. These so called "goitrogens" actually don't cause hypothyroid per say, they instead eliminate the digestion of iodine, similar to how anti-nutrients remove minerals from digestion. So if one were eating them all the time, healthy or unhealthy, it would lower your iodine levels.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on March 21, 2014
at 12:19 PM

It's indeed goitrogenic. All the more reason for a varied diet. You can f-up paleo eating the same foods daily. Daily broccoli would be excessive (of course, my servings of broccoli are 1 pound at a sitting).

8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

(70)

on March 22, 2014
at 02:46 AM

I tend to agree that one should not have too much of one food. I have basically been eating brocolli daily. From a polyphenol point of view, you'd be overdoing particular genotoxins. From a fodmaps pov, you'd have too many indigestibles. From a goitergenic pov you'd be lowering your iodine absorbtion. If you've low blood pressure (which I think I may have posturally, seeing doctor tuesday), things like brocolli lower BP. And if that ruminant study I posted is relevant to humans (may or may not be), it may also effect your blood cells. So there are ways in which you might have too much

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on March 21, 2014
at 10:02 AM

Um, it's not. You could say it has a lot of fiber, and that bothers you - but only when it's raw.

Or you could claim that it's goitrogenic, but for that to be true you'd need quite a lot of it and for it to all be raw... so much so that you couldn't sit down and eat that much broccoli in one day.

Dreams are fun, but they're not reality. Just woke up from one where everyone was a zombie and I figured out how to blend in and pretend to be one, just to avoid getting bit. Dreaming that broccoli is bad for you is yet another form of fiction. Eat up.

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on March 21, 2014
at 05:17 AM

Broccoli is a great veggie.

Dr Art Ayers might caution you on veggies being toxic to the liver and suggest fermenting them but he isn't against eating veggies.

http://coolinginflammation.blogspot.com

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!