0

votes

did paleo people turn grains into bread?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 18, 2013 at 12:10 AM

i know paleo people ate grains on occasion but what i'd like to do is if they had the technology to turn those grains into bread

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 03, 2013
at 01:21 AM

All you need is a rock and fire. dense bread just sits on the brick/ marble/ etc

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 02, 2013
at 09:33 PM

The ketosis mania is more Atkins than ancestral. Of course paleos would have experienced it, but they weren't readers of diet books so would not have avoided ANY food that they could digest.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 02, 2013
at 09:30 PM

What paleos lacked was cooking vessels like cooking baskets and pottery. I suppose chapati or tortilla-like foods could have been cooked on hot stones. The following illustrates a paleo grinding tool. http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/10/revised-paleolithic-diet/

  • 383127951e2e17f23b584cd3842bb796

    asked by

    (835)
  • Views
    1.3K
  • Last Activity
    1410D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

2
0d6a0d86f23e2dac4e99e9621bb42ea9

on January 18, 2013
at 02:01 AM

I love this question and here is some feedback from a Paleo critic below. I want to call out that Sweet Potatoes are actually common in Paleo diets and what is interesting is if you look at the longest living and healthiest people on earth today (the Okinawans) their main source of carbs are from sweet potatoes, not rice, unlike mainland Japanese. I think the real question is carb source vs grains or bread. However, it seems reasonable to assume if a society was able to harvest grains (wheat) for consumption than they were also able to make some form of rudimentary "bread" or wafer.

???All large populations of trim, healthy people, throughout verifiable human history, have obtained the bulk of their calories from starch. Examples of once-thriving people include Japanese, Chinese, and other Asians eating sweet potatoes, buckwheat, and/or rice; Incas in South America eating potatoes; Mayans and Aztecs in Central America eating corn; and Egyptians in the Middle East eating wheat. There have been only a few small isolated populations of primitive people, such as the Arctic Eskimos, living at the extremes of the environment, who have eaten otherwise.??? (source: http://www.drmcdougall.com)

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 02, 2013
at 09:33 PM

The ketosis mania is more Atkins than ancestral. Of course paleos would have experienced it, but they weren't readers of diet books so would not have avoided ANY food that they could digest.

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 02, 2013
at 09:20 PM

By technology you mean a stirring instrument and heat? Yes I am pretty sure they had the technology to do that.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 03, 2013
at 01:21 AM

All you need is a rock and fire. dense bread just sits on the brick/ marble/ etc

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 02, 2013
at 09:30 PM

What paleos lacked was cooking vessels like cooking baskets and pottery. I suppose chapati or tortilla-like foods could have been cooked on hot stones. The following illustrates a paleo grinding tool. http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/10/revised-paleolithic-diet/

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!