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Are more French becoming paleo?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 31, 2013 at 10:40 PM

Less and less consumption of bread in France http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/31/world/europe/a-french-dining-staple-is-losing-its-place-at-the-table.html

718fd304d7abab150730638bf2be5153

(184)

on August 02, 2013
at 08:33 AM

True. A funny fact: the term "corn flakes" is not translated in advertisements here so many people do not realize they're eating corn until you translate it for them.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 01, 2013
at 09:40 PM

Quick, bleh. Give me a McDonalds any day. I'd much rather have a Belgian fry shop to either though.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 08:21 PM

Brasseries, bistros, restaurants, cafes: all these are French words. Convenience, cheapness, and good flavor...no wonder McDo caught on so fast in France. And the French brand - Quick - is equally popular. The French took to American style fast food easily because they invented the concept in the first place. Though it took the Belgians to invent french fries.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 01, 2013
at 05:37 PM

That's not a new phenomenon though often enough street/fast food is shit food.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 05:28 PM

I noticed that while the French embrace wheat, they were pretty standoffish about corn. Livestock food mostly, and not the huge variety of products seen in the Americas.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 02:36 PM

Oh they eat more than crusty breads I assure you...the cheap sandwich at the train station is replaced with croissants and other pastries. French cafeteria-style restaurants were heavy on pasta. And couscous is warmly embraced given the huge emigre population. Very cheap and all over on the street. Wups, left out crepes....some are buckwheat but most are sweet sugary walk up snacks with about the same calories and nutritional value as half a dozen twinkies

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 02:30 PM

The raw materials are all there, just expensive. Shucking your own live scallops is fun.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 02:29 PM

I lost weight eating baguettes in France. That's why I consider "Dr." Davis a crock. It wasn't the baguettes per se, so much as all that walking.

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7 Answers

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2
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on July 31, 2013
at 11:41 PM

They were always leaning that way. When me and my wife were near vegetarian (20 yrs ago), we took a one week bike trip in France (beautiful). But in the hotels at night we would get zucchini wrapped in bacon, or potatoes roasted and soaked in duck fat. My wife was very unhappy with that. Then there is the fact that no liver goes to waste there, that there is a lot of grass fed cheese and milk (we would buy the cheese during the ride, it was always great), and you should see the plates of creepy crawlies (some still crawling) which are served in seafood restaurants. Lots of offal, and lots of vegetable gardens, too. Their principles are sound.

1
718fd304d7abab150730638bf2be5153

(184)

on August 01, 2013
at 03:30 PM

"Are more French becoming paleo?" No, paleo is still a very small here in France.

I think the French eat less bread because we eat more industrialized, overprocessed food : instead of bread and butter for breakfast, it's now Kellog's cereals and so on.

Of course, the giant wheat industry is worried and wants to push consumption back up through advertising. So nice of them.

718fd304d7abab150730638bf2be5153

(184)

on August 02, 2013
at 08:33 AM

True. A funny fact: the term "corn flakes" is not translated in advertisements here so many people do not realize they're eating corn until you translate it for them.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 05:28 PM

I noticed that while the French embrace wheat, they were pretty standoffish about corn. Livestock food mostly, and not the huge variety of products seen in the Americas.

1
6b45df966834b942fdb3d9cec7fe7dd0

on August 01, 2013
at 05:43 AM

I'm French too, and into paleo for only 6 months. Bread is a staple here! It's so good, I can understand... But there is, as glib said, a lot of very good quality whole food. Grassfed and organic are a big thing here.

1
89985542ffc00c296552951369fe809a

on July 31, 2013
at 11:46 PM

LOL - Well I am french and I have been Paleo for 11 years... It's finally catching on over there ;)

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 02:30 PM

The raw materials are all there, just expensive. Shucking your own live scallops is fun.

0
Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 02:26 PM

Bread is big in France because it's cheap calories to stoke the masses. Traditional. Cheap. People's food. How French can you get.

Well, there is the other side...picky, snobby, individualist, regionalist...given enough wealth you tend to not eat bread. The sheer variety of meats available when I was in France was tasty and mind-boggling. None of it was cheap though. I could have lived on scallops in the shell, duck, fish soup and moules frites. But the budget got balanced on bread, rice and couscous.

The French have always been clever confecting yeast and bacteria into processed foods. Bread, cheese and wine; and in modern times yogurt was embraced faster here than elsewhere. I don't think bread is going away but with wealth less is eaten. Processed foods will take longer, and despite Guyenet's heritage rewarding foods will never go away. This is the soul of France.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 01, 2013
at 01:15 PM

Americans are the ones that are so bread centric, we then project our own bread/grain-centric diet onto other world cuisines. Asians eat nothing but rice. French eat nothing but crusty french breads. Italians eat nothing but pizza and pasta.

An American menu of: breakfast, corn flakes. lunch, bologna on white bread. dinner, hamburger on a bun with a side of pasta. That does not seem so far off the mark for "normal" people. I'd wager most world cuisines are closer to paleo than they are to our standard diet brethren.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 02:36 PM

Oh they eat more than crusty breads I assure you...the cheap sandwich at the train station is replaced with croissants and other pastries. French cafeteria-style restaurants were heavy on pasta. And couscous is warmly embraced given the huge emigre population. Very cheap and all over on the street. Wups, left out crepes....some are buckwheat but most are sweet sugary walk up snacks with about the same calories and nutritional value as half a dozen twinkies

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 08:21 PM

Brasseries, bistros, restaurants, cafes: all these are French words. Convenience, cheapness, and good flavor...no wonder McDo caught on so fast in France. And the French brand - Quick - is equally popular. The French took to American style fast food easily because they invented the concept in the first place. Though it took the Belgians to invent french fries.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 01, 2013
at 05:37 PM

That's not a new phenomenon though often enough street/fast food is shit food.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 01, 2013
at 09:40 PM

Quick, bleh. Give me a McDonalds any day. I'd much rather have a Belgian fry shop to either though.

0
F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on August 01, 2013
at 12:41 AM

I found that article interesting. I like how the baguette lobby is arguing it's good for weight control. Um, not quite. But it is tasty, I'll give them that.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 01, 2013
at 02:29 PM

I lost weight eating baguettes in France. That's why I consider "Dr." Davis a crock. It wasn't the baguettes per se, so much as all that walking.

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