2

votes

paleo diet long term

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 19, 2012 at 3:45 PM

I'm on a course of advanced biochemistry. I was told there that eating paleo long term increases the amount of ketone in the bodies, which in turn increases the chances of developing ketoacidosis.

My teacher also insisted that glucose is necessary as the brain's energy source.

My question is about the effects of the ketonic bodies, and if the carbohydrates eaten in fruits, vegetables, and meat (glycogen) is enough to supply that energy for the brain?

If anyone has a paper that discusses those things, I would appreciate it.

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on May 12, 2013
at 02:31 PM

Oh dear, if the professor of your "advanced biochemistry" course can't tell the difference from beneficial and benign dietary ketosis and ketoacidosis, you've got some serious problems. What other misinformation is that professor propagating? You are not getting the quality education you are paying for.

77188106a9c27a22ad47d0ef7318de7a

(922)

on May 12, 2013
at 03:31 AM

how pleasant of you to join our site TODAY and drop in for some solid dietary advice. get out of here TROLL and get yourself some protein.

77188106a9c27a22ad47d0ef7318de7a

(922)

on May 12, 2013
at 03:30 AM

+1 for sugary fruits and starchy vegetables

Medium avatar

(2338)

on August 19, 2012
at 11:02 PM

+1 for paleo is not a low-carb diet... i think that's the biggest misconception most people have and what turns most people off to it

276a5e631b62f8e0793987c0496364bb

(1644)

on August 19, 2012
at 04:38 PM

To add to 3 - and lactate: http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2012/08/protons-lactate.html

  • 6f795043de869dcf68903bf550e4f869

    asked by

    (10)
  • Views
    3.6K
  • Last Activity
    1278D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

8
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 19, 2012
at 04:50 PM

There's a big difference in ketosis and ketoacidosis, not just in the quantity of ketone bodies, but the context. For diabetics, the presence of large amount of ketones (ketoacidosis) indicates that the body cannot use glucose as a fuel source, even if its present in large quantities. This indicates that insulin isn't working and the body has to break down protien instead, which are your muscles. This is very bad. You have large amounts of blood glucose, which damages kidneys and eyes etc, and you're breaking down your muscles, which is never good long term. Let me repeat: This is bad.

Ketosis, on the other hand, is actually a normal phenomenom. Your body is designed to switch fuel sources fairly easily, although this ability has been diminished with our non-stop carb intake. Ketones are produced when your body breaks down protein, whether its from diet or your own body.

The misconception that paleo is a more natural sourced Atkins diet raises a lot of (unfounded) fears of ketoacidosis. First off, the emphasis on fats and veggies instead of unlimited proteins usually doesn't kick off ketosis on a regular basis. Periodically, I'll get some ketone strips for analytical purposes to see what my body is doing, but not to try to get into ketosis. What I have observed is that I almost never get into ketosis, and if I do, its slight.

Another ketosis factor is exercise, which is part of the paleo lifestlye (NOT A DIET!!). I am never in ketosis immediately after exercise. Why? I've just used all the fuel! If I don't eat anything for a few hours, it'll kick in big time, but I almost never do that.

Now, as far as the brain using glucose... Your brain can use both glucose and ketones for fuel, EXCEPT for some small parts of the brain which needs to use glucose. The amount of glucose needed to fuel this is about the same that your liver can produce from protein. Pretty convenient. You're in school, look up the amounts.

To answer your question, No. The chances are minimal, if non-existant, that you'll get into ketoacidosis on a paleo diet/lifestyle.

6
0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

on August 19, 2012
at 04:34 PM

  1. Paleo is not a low-carb diet. Thus the amount of ketones in your blood is not particularly high. It might be raised slightly, but the amount is negligible. You CAN be low-carb Paleo, if you want and that WILL raise your ketones by a significant amount.

  2. Ketosis and Ketoacidosis are not the same thing and is one of the oldest and stupidest health myths out there. If you're not diabetic, you won't get ketoacidosis. And even then.

  3. The brain utilizes ketones and glucose. Tell your teacher to do a bit more research on how John Hopkins hospital treats epileptic patients - with a ketogenic diet.

There's no carbohydrate in meat. There might be small amounts of glycogen if you were to kill the animal and consume the meat FRESH. But by time it gets to your plate, it has no glycogen and thus it's 100% useless as a source of carbs.

http://josepharcita.blogspot.com/2011/03/guide-to-ketosis.html

All of this research is out there if you and your teacher are willing to look.

276a5e631b62f8e0793987c0496364bb

(1644)

on August 19, 2012
at 04:38 PM

To add to 3 - and lactate: http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2012/08/protons-lactate.html

Medium avatar

(2338)

on August 19, 2012
at 11:02 PM

+1 for paleo is not a low-carb diet... i think that's the biggest misconception most people have and what turns most people off to it

3
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on August 19, 2012
at 06:15 PM

Here is a blog of a formal Paleo-eater. He has been Paleo for 14 years and developed different disorders. So now he is more like Weston Price or gluten-free whole foods - not sure how to describe it. He is eating more grains and tubers.

Here is his blog: http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2011/06/farewell-to-paleo.html

Dear Paleohackers, please do not consider this link or my answer an attack on Paleo. I think each case should be viewed on an individual basis, and it will help the person who asked the question in his search. I personally would not follow this guy's diet, but hey, what works for one not necessarily works for another. Plus his wife is a vegetarian now (being a formal Paleo).

2
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on August 19, 2012
at 09:43 PM

A good resource for you are the works of Volek and Phinney. They explain very well what happens to the body with a low carbohydrate diet. This is not necessarily the same thing as what happens to someone on a paleolithic diet because the paleo diet can include lots of starchy vegetables and sugary fruit if someone wants it.

77188106a9c27a22ad47d0ef7318de7a

(922)

on May 12, 2013
at 03:30 AM

+1 for sugary fruits and starchy vegetables

-1
C56b4c193ca2b9f7a2fe6dc83fcce9d3

on May 12, 2013
at 03:17 AM

One of Dr. John McDougall's recent newsletters had an article regarding the consequences of a Paleo diet.

Dr. McDougall is an Internal Medicine Specialist, and is involved in the research of Multiple Sclerosis. Be sure to sign up for his free monthly e-newsletters that comes out faithfully on the last day of each month and always has recipes from his wife Mary who is a dietician, or his daughter Heather, as well other reputable chefs.

77188106a9c27a22ad47d0ef7318de7a

(922)

on May 12, 2013
at 03:31 AM

how pleasant of you to join our site TODAY and drop in for some solid dietary advice. get out of here TROLL and get yourself some protein.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!