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optimal usage of paleo brain: sprinting vs endurance

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 12, 2012 at 1:56 PM

Brain is similar to body where both brain and body are made of cell membranes with receptor/effector. Optimal fitness training in paleo body is in sprinting rather than endurance due to mounting evidences like cardiac fibrosis and others in endurance training.

Question is : " what is analogue of sprinting vs endurance fitness progression training" in paleo brain on ketones ? Perhaps endurance training in paleo brain is ruminations like in chronic anger/anxiety, while high intensity interval training of paleo brain is complete focusing and concentration. I try to be a better hunter/gatherer by optimizing both body and brain. I try to find better optimal usage of paleobrain repeating "proven training method of progression in sprinting in paleo body".

I would be ideal to repeat what is achieved in physical fitness: HIIT(high intensity interval training) with progressions supported by occasional recovery plan(ice/48 rest period for fatigued muscles). Precise activation of paleo body muscles in progressions (like activating trapezius, latissimus dorsi, multifidus in certain sequence with programmed intensities). Precision training of muscles in brain(prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, amygdala hippocampus ...) with specific activation method(how can I precisely activate a certain part of brain in a specific sequence with increasing intensity of progression)?

What is "brain muscle tear/fatigue" if I exceed my brain limit in my brain training? what are available recovery plan in brain like icing /rest 48 hours in case of body.

2bc6d4294c42a78bf9e7c754f87ef427

(172)

on February 14, 2012
at 12:24 PM

Curt thanks for very practical Baumeister's willpower and I profit from reading. Baumeister's experiments show that brain resource becomes depleted after acts of self-control, decision making and active choices. Paleobrain has advantage over SAD brain of steady supply of ATP required for active pumping in propagation of electric signals through axons and synapses. Paleobrain with high omega-3 will move serotonin better than SAD brain. Dual N=Back on the Bulletproof executive which you recommend is similar to ARCH(auto regressive conditional heteroskedasticiy) which I use extensively in

2bc6d4294c42a78bf9e7c754f87ef427

(172)

on February 14, 2012
at 12:03 PM

thanks raydawg for training methods. Inspired by your suggestions, I program daily progressive brain workout to 1. to thicken axon myelin sheath around axon of neuron 2. superset of 3 repetitions of "flexibility and strength training" of core belief muscles in CBT starting from easy to difficult to optimize my emotional state for better brain usage 3. activate reticular activating system in thalamus for processing audio/visual inputs and direct experience through insula and anterior cingulate cortex for better awareness of present facts and process later in separate

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on February 12, 2012
at 07:36 PM

what is a 90 session? 90 minutes? seconds? miles?

Febcfb45a6bec019a69101cfa8104d30

(463)

on February 12, 2012
at 04:08 PM

This is the book about willpower I was referencing: http://www.amazon.com/Willpower-Rediscovering-Greatest-Human-Strength/dp/1594203075/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1329062877&sr=8-1

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Febcfb45a6bec019a69101cfa8104d30

(463)

on February 12, 2012
at 04:06 PM

The brain is very different from muscle, and does not function according to the same biological principles. It wants to and is capable of being active almost constantly.

However, based on my experiments with learning there is a need for a change of pace in what the brain is doing for best results. For this I utilize the timeboxing method, which basically involves using a timer to completely devote myself mentally to a task for 25 or so minutes, after which I take a 5 minute break and switch to another task (or continue with the same one if needed). I find this useful in my language studies, as I am now studying Japanese ~5 hours a day.

Perhaps the part of the mind most amenable to training in a manner analogous to muscle is willpower, as described by Baumeister in his recent book of the same name. As a psychologist, he's done a number of experiments with willpower and found that it does indeed respond like a muscle. It can become drained and weakened with overuse (every time you make a decision, resist an impulse, or make yourself do something, willpower is drained). It can be replenished with food. I don't believe he did any experiments with ketones, but the experiments showed that food in general but especially glucose (which can be derived from many foods, of course) replenished willpower, increasing the amount of time subjects were willing to spend on a task or increasing their resistance to temptations.

It can also be exercised and increased over time. For example, in one 2-week experiment subjects who were told to consciously make themselves sit up and stand up straight whenever they thought about it had significantly increased in all measures of willpower by the end of the experiment.

There's a lot more helpful information in the book, and I highly recommend it.

There is also a type of brain training, now that I think about it, that might be equivalent to HIIT. I haven't tried it myself yet, but look up Dual N-Back training on the Bulletproof Executive's website. Supposedly 25 minutes a day or so can significantly increase IQ.

2bc6d4294c42a78bf9e7c754f87ef427

(172)

on February 14, 2012
at 12:24 PM

Curt thanks for very practical Baumeister's willpower and I profit from reading. Baumeister's experiments show that brain resource becomes depleted after acts of self-control, decision making and active choices. Paleobrain has advantage over SAD brain of steady supply of ATP required for active pumping in propagation of electric signals through axons and synapses. Paleobrain with high omega-3 will move serotonin better than SAD brain. Dual N=Back on the Bulletproof executive which you recommend is similar to ARCH(auto regressive conditional heteroskedasticiy) which I use extensively in

Febcfb45a6bec019a69101cfa8104d30

(463)

on February 12, 2012
at 04:08 PM

This is the book about willpower I was referencing: http://www.amazon.com/Willpower-Rediscovering-Greatest-Human-Strength/dp/1594203075/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1329062877&sr=8-1

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on February 12, 2012
at 07:15 PM

Learning new things, and working on problems. Sleep and rest are the recovery methods.

To clarify, neurons make more connections to others when learning and after we sleep we somehow optimize these connections and store the memories.

Problem is that once you get good at something, you can continue exercising that skill and get really good (the 10K hours thing), but you'll only be exercising that part of the brain and the neurons that are newly dedicated to that kind of task. So you'll need to occasionally switch to new skills, but if you don't practice the old stuff you've learned, it will slowly atrophy, though it won't go away.

Periods of deep concentration followed by breaks help. i.e. you're in a two hour lecture, so you need breaks every half hour or so to let it sink in, and let the neurons rest.

Paying attention is critical as we'll tend to wonder off if it's boring. Hence, things like taking notes work to make the material sink in, because you're working both visually (looking at your notes as you're writing them), and audibly (listening to the lecturer), though that's an oversimplification.

I used to train others about 12 years ago. If you're lecturing and you have a bit of voice roll (going up and down in tone/speed) helps the students remember, but it also causes them to fall asleep, so you have to break it up in section.

I tended to not have slides, but rather write notes on the board to help the students get enough time to copy down the notes and let the stuff sink in. Also, it provided them with notes to copy, so they wouldn't misinterpret what was critical. Then, I'd do demos and show them, but left the notes up and pointed to them as I did the demos, so it would hit them via written text, visual, as well as audible areas, so it would sink in, then they'd get to do the same during the labs, so they'd get hands on too.

Different people have different ways to learn. Some go audible, some written, etc. Younger ones tend to want a superficial overview, older ones more details and examples, but even so, those are generalizations, and it varies.

Figure out what ways you learn best and pursue those. i.e. I tend to like short articles on the web, but for deeper stuff, I prefer CBTs for the audio/visual side of it, as I'll loose interest after a few hours if the material is the same exact subject.

2bc6d4294c42a78bf9e7c754f87ef427

(172)

on February 14, 2012
at 12:03 PM

thanks raydawg for training methods. Inspired by your suggestions, I program daily progressive brain workout to 1. to thicken axon myelin sheath around axon of neuron 2. superset of 3 repetitions of "flexibility and strength training" of core belief muscles in CBT starting from easy to difficult to optimize my emotional state for better brain usage 3. activate reticular activating system in thalamus for processing audio/visual inputs and direct experience through insula and anterior cingulate cortex for better awareness of present facts and process later in separate

1
095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on February 12, 2012
at 05:54 PM

You could try completing soduku puzzles very quickly. Brain sprints?

1
Medium avatar

(19469)

on February 12, 2012
at 05:21 PM

I'd say the mental equivalent of "sprinting" would be intensly learning a new skill.

For example, I'm currently studying music theory (guitar) and it literally feels like my head is hurting just trying to wrap my mind around the foreign concepts.

"Endurance" mental work would be something repetitive that possibly allows you to drift to other thoughts.

So, I would say that "Endurance" vs "Sprinting" exists along a spectrum of increasing attentional demand. The closer you get to a singularity of focus, the higher the intensity.

0
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on February 12, 2012
at 04:37 PM

Sprinting and it's not close. In a standard 26.2 mile marathon you burn 2600 calories.....with my 90 minute session this AM in a cool tub with ice I burned 3800 calories and created no ROS. When you use your brain to think sometimes amazing things happen.

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on February 12, 2012
at 07:36 PM

what is a 90 session? 90 minutes? seconds? miles?

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