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Opinions on Brad Pilon's "How Much Protein?"

Commented on September 17, 2015
Created April 12, 2013 at 4:00 PM

Has anyone read Brad Pilon's "How Much Protein?"? If not, hit me up (FB link on my profile) and I can send you the PDF.

If you HAVE, what do you think?

Essentially he says 70g-120g of protein/day is sufficient for all levels of fitness and beyond 120g there is no proven benefit. I used to shoot for 1g protein per lb (180lbs, shoot for 170g-180g). Now I go more for 110g-130g.

Not that I think this makes a huge difference, but curious if anyone has changed drastically after reading this? Or has an experience after lowering protein levels (either losing/maintaining/gaining muscle)? Or just thinks this is total BS?

Answers backed by at least a little data would be nice =)

05d5bf43df23aeeb1ca31d28d994f97c

on September 17, 2015
at 10:22 AM

Sorry to be late to the party but could you send me the pdf, Desmond? I could not find your FB link.  I think there is a lot to Brad's claims.

6ec707b265183ba4e5a8a058a0726503

(0)

on December 20, 2013
at 03:04 AM

I didn't see any link to a fb page..I'd like to read that book

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 12, 2013
at 08:41 PM

Good point. Even with the nutrients our bodies don't lay down muscle like tree rings.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 12, 2013
at 08:39 PM

+1 for "just eat". Up to a point more protein helps, beyond that it's no different than a carb or fat calorie as bulk fuel, and at extreme levels maybe detrimental. Protein self-regulates to an extent because it's expensive.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 12, 2013
at 07:38 PM

Yea man, that seems unnecessarily low to me, but that's no reason not to give it a try and see if it works for you. The only way you'll know which macros work best for you is by trying new things like this.

86c97b2779feab3c330f5e1c5fea7e25

(2312)

on April 12, 2013
at 06:59 PM

@Stephen it's not a fixed amount, just a range depending on size, exercise, etc. Not that I'm supporting but just saying

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 12, 2013
at 06:51 PM

Yikes, that would be like .3-.55 grams of protein per pound for me. There was a study I ran across somewhere showing calorie surplus diets for people who ate either 5, 15, or 25% protein. http://www.ergo-log.com/eatingmoreprotein.html . You can see the results for yourself, and the amount of protein you mentioned would be appropriate for some and inappropriate for others. I don't think anyone can say that any fixed amount of protein is necessarily Right for all goals that all people could have though.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 12, 2013
at 05:25 PM

I do have a problem with fats. But those doctors told me about protein consumption without any knowledge of me having problems with fats.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on April 12, 2013
at 04:57 PM

But, VB, if I remember right, you've got some problems with fats, so I suspect you are using protein as fuel source. That isn't something we want to do.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 12, 2013
at 04:09 PM

Two different doctors told me the same. 120 gr per day. But it does not work for me, I need more. No data, just n=1.

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7 Answers

2
4610451431ec7155c87a5698be682a95

(1122)

on April 12, 2013
at 05:53 PM

Just read the PHD chapter on protein. Basically 400-600 calories of protein is good for most without incurring any toxicity issues. This equates to around a pound per day.

2
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on April 12, 2013
at 05:18 PM

This makes sense to me. Too many folks believe that protein intake = protein synthesis = muscle growth and forget that the key to muscle growth/retention is resistance work, (assuming the minimum protein requirements are met.)

http://thesimplesaloon.com/2011/03/12/muscle-building-101/ (check out the comments section for more thoughts...)

http://thesimplesaloon.com/2011/06/04/the-gospel-you-can-do-without/ (relevant links here.)

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 12, 2013
at 08:41 PM

Good point. Even with the nutrients our bodies don't lay down muscle like tree rings.

1
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on April 13, 2013
at 01:49 PM

On a high-carb diet (>600 calories/day), 600 protein calories/day maximizes muscle gain.
On a low-carb diet (<600 calories/day), 1200 carb+protein calories/day maximizes muscle gain.
...leucine supplementation would reduce his protein needs a bit.
http://bit.ly/10PSczw

1
874ff271ca3379984344d5f9f760fec3

on April 13, 2013
at 11:29 AM

After 75 grams of protein daily for three days my fasting glucose begins to surpass 100, it takes a few days of <50 grams to get fasting glucose back into the 80's

It seems to me protein acts as a timed release sugar after about 20 grams per meal.

1
5983854773a45b09a77a09ee97bdef42

on April 13, 2013
at 01:31 AM

It depends on the individual. 70-120 grams a day is such a small range. The body uses proteins as sugar when there isn't enough in the diet. if you're training with weights and not consuming enough carbs then that protein gets broken down into sugar and it's not enough. i have been bodybuilding for years and when i am on and actively training I consume 1.5 - 2 grams of protein for every pound of bodyweight and the difference in my workout quality, pumps, recovery times and hormone levels is like night and day. toxicity is an issue if you are sendentary and don't utilize the protein, and aren't consuming enough greens to support your liver, kidneys and digestive tract.

1
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on April 12, 2013
at 05:02 PM

I used to do this, but I went with my best guess for lean mass, which was 150. I don't think that is necessary anymore either. I probably still get somewhere near there because I just eat, but if I were to try and get economical about the subject, I might try to get 20g per dose and make up calories with something else, since good protein tends to be more expensive than other things.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on April 12, 2013
at 08:39 PM

+1 for "just eat". Up to a point more protein helps, beyond that it's no different than a carb or fat calorie as bulk fuel, and at extreme levels maybe detrimental. Protein self-regulates to an extent because it's expensive.

0
742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on April 13, 2013
at 01:27 AM

I somewhat agree with what he says if you are on a calorie surplus. However in order to retain muscle more effectively during a calorie deficit a higher protein intake is required.

Part of the reason I don't like consuming too much protein is because protein isn't really an energy nutrient, it builds, and in order for it to build properly without converting to energy you need to consume enough of the other energy nutrients (carbs/fat). Plus why waste money on protein for energy when carbs and fat are much cheaper.

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