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Easy, Non-Messy Way to Make Bone Broth?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 14, 2013 at 1:49 AM

Does anyone have a good system for getting bone broth out of a crockpot and filtering it without making a huge mess?

3bc294cb7745a5e99612ff886ca00101

(1186)

on January 16, 2013
at 05:56 PM

Hmmm ok. In that case, it makes sense to pour most of the fat out at the bone roasting phase, when it is only heated for a couple of hours, before adding it to the simmering liquid. Esp. when using marrow-rich pieces as you don't want that goodness to be discarded!

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 15, 2013
at 09:18 PM

There are quite a few questions here with similar threads. Most of it is IMO-type useless information, but is is quite clear that ALL fats oxidize (go rancid) when cooking at ANY heat, and higher the heat and longer you cook the more oxidization occurs. Since I simmer my stock for 24+ hours, I don't want to take the risk and throw it away - it appears that oxidation occurs at much shorter times. That's IMO, also, but there doesn't seem to be definitive information available.

3bc294cb7745a5e99612ff886ca00101

(1186)

on January 15, 2013
at 01:21 PM

Thanks for answering, I searched the topic here. Found this for example: http://paleohacks.com/questions/69891/can-long-cooking-of-bone-broth-create-rancidity#axzz2I38ugrWp Is there info I'm missing? As it is I see no reason not to use the fat rendered from broth making. By the way I am referring to beef or lamb bone stock, not poultry.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 15, 2013
at 01:39 AM

All oils go rancid when you heat them for extended periods of time, like you do when making broth/stock.

3bc294cb7745a5e99612ff886ca00101

(1186)

on January 14, 2013
at 09:01 PM

I've never heard that before... what does that mean?

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 14, 2013
at 02:42 PM

This is what I do. It's not super messy, but there are some spills.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 14, 2013
at 02:41 PM

The top layer of fat is thoroughly oxidized, so I discard it.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 14, 2013
at 02:39 PM

I make stock, not broth, and it won't go through a coffee filter. I use a fine sieve.

8f2d9842fdfec224a425c0f77c4ee34d

(1241)

on January 14, 2013
at 02:20 PM

Great idea with the coffee filter and funnel, I might try that.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on January 14, 2013
at 04:46 AM

I do this. Bones and gristle into trash, pour the rest through my gold coffee filter that's resting on a canning funnel.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on January 14, 2013
at 04:45 AM

canning funnels are the best! so useful.

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7 Answers

best answer

3
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on January 14, 2013
at 01:58 AM

I'm not sure if it's the best system, but this is what I use:

  • 1 quart or 1/2 gallon mason jar(s)
  • funnel for canning (easily found on Amazon)
  • Cone-shaped coffee filter (like the gold colored ones you can reuse in drip coffee machines)
  • ladle

I set the mason jar(s) on a folded dish towel, insert the wide funnel and coffee filter (on top of the funnel--should fit nicely), and ladle the broth in. Once you get down to only a little liquid at the end, remove the bones and carefully tip the crock pot to ladle the rest out. (Alternatively, at that point you can carefully pour it out.)

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on January 14, 2013
at 04:45 AM

canning funnels are the best! so useful.

8f2d9842fdfec224a425c0f77c4ee34d

(1241)

on January 14, 2013
at 02:20 PM

Great idea with the coffee filter and funnel, I might try that.

3
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on January 14, 2013
at 04:28 AM

You can pull most everything out with tongs, first. Then pour.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on January 14, 2013
at 04:46 AM

I do this. Bones and gristle into trash, pour the rest through my gold coffee filter that's resting on a canning funnel.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 14, 2013
at 02:39 PM

I make stock, not broth, and it won't go through a coffee filter. I use a fine sieve.

0
6df687f771c8c3bbf2c37b2333645991

on January 14, 2013
at 06:31 PM

I'll just throw in my 2 cents here. If you are double filtering it (ie. straining through a colander and then through cheesecloth or some other finer sieve) get ahold of one of those mixing bowls with the pour spout and the handle for your final container before pouring into your mason jars. Here's the one I Have: http://www.amazon.com/Norpro-Grip-EZ-Melamine-Batter-Yellow/dp/B000ANW76C/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1358188223&sr=8-2&keywords=mixing+bowl+with+handle

And I use this exact sieve which has two layers of mesh: http://www.hydroponicshopsofamerica.com/DOUBLE_MESH_STRAINER_10_p/ldc-4675.htm

0
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on January 14, 2013
at 04:04 PM

I strain into a stock pot with a colander on top. This catches all of the big stuff. If necessary, I strain again through a fine mesh sieve into another pot or big serving bowls to put into the fridge. Once the fat has hardened, I scoop all of it off and then can the stock. I found an oblong crock pot was easier to pour from, but now use a pressure cooker to make bone broth in an hour.

0
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on January 14, 2013
at 02:07 PM

I use a big pot, fish the big bones out with a slotted spoon or tongs. After that strain through a fine mesh or other sieve into a large pirex dish or soemthing like that. Beyond the pot that is isued, all this really emsses up is the strainer. It's impossible to 'cleanly' direct the stock through the sieve if the bones are all in there. I'm sure I've done it and mess is made. By removing the big ones first though that's pretty much avioded...

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 14, 2013
at 02:42 PM

This is what I do. It's not super messy, but there are some spills.

0
3bc294cb7745a5e99612ff886ca00101

(1186)

on January 14, 2013
at 05:33 AM

It's easier to pour the broth from almost any bowl than from a slowcooker, so pouring into a bowl first is a good start.

This is what I do-- Remove large bones from crockpot when ready. Pour through sieve into tall bowl (bowl shaped sieve in this case) Cover bowl with a plate or plastic wrap in the fridge. When cold, remove the top layer of fat for whatever nefarious cooking purposes you have, and the meat jello underneath is good to go and lasts a few days.

3bc294cb7745a5e99612ff886ca00101

(1186)

on January 15, 2013
at 01:21 PM

Thanks for answering, I searched the topic here. Found this for example: http://paleohacks.com/questions/69891/can-long-cooking-of-bone-broth-create-rancidity#axzz2I38ugrWp Is there info I'm missing? As it is I see no reason not to use the fat rendered from broth making. By the way I am referring to beef or lamb bone stock, not poultry.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 14, 2013
at 02:41 PM

The top layer of fat is thoroughly oxidized, so I discard it.

3bc294cb7745a5e99612ff886ca00101

(1186)

on January 14, 2013
at 09:01 PM

I've never heard that before... what does that mean?

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 15, 2013
at 01:39 AM

All oils go rancid when you heat them for extended periods of time, like you do when making broth/stock.

3bc294cb7745a5e99612ff886ca00101

(1186)

on January 16, 2013
at 05:56 PM

Hmmm ok. In that case, it makes sense to pour most of the fat out at the bone roasting phase, when it is only heated for a couple of hours, before adding it to the simmering liquid. Esp. when using marrow-rich pieces as you don't want that goodness to be discarded!

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 15, 2013
at 09:18 PM

There are quite a few questions here with similar threads. Most of it is IMO-type useless information, but is is quite clear that ALL fats oxidize (go rancid) when cooking at ANY heat, and higher the heat and longer you cook the more oxidization occurs. Since I simmer my stock for 24+ hours, I don't want to take the risk and throw it away - it appears that oxidation occurs at much shorter times. That's IMO, also, but there doesn't seem to be definitive information available.

0
19ff515e8ec02d95e8f2cf68c3ec1373

(1207)

on January 14, 2013
at 02:24 AM

I dont use a crock lot, it's too hot even at the lowest setting. Strain slowly with a sieve, cheese cloth. A d a ladle.

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