6

votes

What are the easiest bones to eat?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 23, 2013 at 1:19 AM

Hey guys sorry for all these questions about bones buuuuut.

I'm proposing that paleo man got adequate calcium from bones. He didn't have dairy, he had limited supplies to calcium and he had a very strong bone structure. He did not get that bone structure just from exercise, he had to of been getting a bio-available form of calcium such as hydroxyapatite (the calcium-phosphate bond found in bones).

I want to include more easy to prepare nutrient dense bones in my diet. What is the easiest way I can accomplish this? I bought some beef femurs but I'm slowly realizing after many hours of cooking that they won't be soft anytime soon. I know that the bones in canned fish are extremely soft, how can i get fish bones that soft myself? Do I just boil them or what? It might sound weird that I'm here eating bones but I assure you that I'm not getting the bulk of my calories from them (or anywhere near), I just consider them an exceptional addition to my diet, and am considering using them to displace dairy in my diet.

So use your brain power, your ingenuity and let me know what you think the easiest, most cost effective, time efficient method to include more (very soft cooked) bones in my diet would be. Which bones would you recommend and how would you cook them?

Similar questions:

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 25, 2013
at 03:24 AM

Yea, so you're definitely right, lol. Thanks for all the advice here. I was torn between yours' and Michael's answer but the times and how to cook different bones was extremely useful. Thanks :))

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 25, 2013
at 12:21 AM

Lol, I read this right after I bought a cut up femur from Whole Foods and put it in a pressure cooker. I figure I'll leave it in for like 6 hours, see if it's soft and if it's not I'll just cook it another 6. Then if it's not I'll get the bulbous joint bones tomorrow. I'll let you know how/if it turns out. And you're right, fish eyes are like one of the densest sources of Vit A last time I checked.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on May 24, 2013
at 08:57 AM

That is great to know, thanks. Certainly helps to further explain my teeth getting better. 'Eat what ails you' indeed, eastern medicine gets another feather in its cap. So too whole foods...

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 24, 2013
at 05:40 AM

The bulbous joint bones go soft, not the femur. I often eat those soft joint bones. Lamb bones go soft much faster, rib bones are actually little crispy even if you roast them and pressure cook them.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 24, 2013
at 04:39 AM

The eyes are not too bad actually, there just the small ring in the eye that is not too good but rest of it with is muscle and nerves is great, it has so much fat also that propably one of the most nutrient dense parts there is.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 24, 2013
at 01:29 AM

Oh wow dude, thanks for the times, I had no idea you could get beef knuckle-bones soft in 3 hours using a pressure cooker. Your fish-head looks very paleo but the eyes in fish are always freaky to me. Thanks for your input Jan.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 23, 2013
at 11:30 AM

That's pretty awesome what you said about your n=1 for your teeth. It turns out the calcium phosphate in bones is called hydroxyapatite and while it's seemingly true that hydroxyapatite has a lower absorption rate than many calcium salts when compared using loading tests, it actually outperforms calcium salts in preventing bone thinning and promoting bone growth in clinical trials. See my answer here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/196743/will-eating-bones-make-my-bones-bigger#axzz2U74lsfbw .

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 23, 2013
at 11:13 AM

That's awesome, I have a 22 qt stainless steel pot and a slow cooker but it makes since that a pressure cooker would make bones softer quicker, I plan to get on of those today along with some fish bones.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on May 23, 2013
at 04:33 AM

Lol. Bontasia. :)

  • Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

    asked by

    (10989)
  • Views
    1.7K
  • Last Activity
    1431D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

best answer

3
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 23, 2013
at 03:45 AM

I have pressure cooked recently large bones from 13kg wild salmon, bones go soft in 30mins, or less. Salmon head has some soft cartilige near the mouth that you can eat. I always eat most of it. Beef knucklebones go soft in 3hours in pressure cooker. Yesterday i had one large salmon head steamed: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10200402145548569&set=pb.1003675475.-2207520000.1369280684.&type=3&theater

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 24, 2013
at 05:40 AM

The bulbous joint bones go soft, not the femur. I often eat those soft joint bones. Lamb bones go soft much faster, rib bones are actually little crispy even if you roast them and pressure cook them.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 24, 2013
at 04:39 AM

The eyes are not too bad actually, there just the small ring in the eye that is not too good but rest of it with is muscle and nerves is great, it has so much fat also that propably one of the most nutrient dense parts there is.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 24, 2013
at 01:29 AM

Oh wow dude, thanks for the times, I had no idea you could get beef knuckle-bones soft in 3 hours using a pressure cooker. Your fish-head looks very paleo but the eyes in fish are always freaky to me. Thanks for your input Jan.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 25, 2013
at 03:24 AM

Yea, so you're definitely right, lol. Thanks for all the advice here. I was torn between yours' and Michael's answer but the times and how to cook different bones was extremely useful. Thanks :))

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 25, 2013
at 12:21 AM

Lol, I read this right after I bought a cut up femur from Whole Foods and put it in a pressure cooker. I figure I'll leave it in for like 6 hours, see if it's soft and if it's not I'll just cook it another 6. Then if it's not I'll get the bulbous joint bones tomorrow. I'll let you know how/if it turns out. And you're right, fish eyes are like one of the densest sources of Vit A last time I checked.

5
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on May 23, 2013
at 03:40 AM

Here is an 'n=1'

I eat bones regularly, mainly knuckle bones from beef and the long ones where the marrow is (was), as well as lamb neck and shank bones. Only the bones in the middle of osso bucco seem particularly resistant to breaking down; apart from those, I say go for any that you can get that are cheap, get maximal bang for buck, possibly through re using them multiple times through method suggested below.

The most cost effective way I can think of is to use a pressure cooker, although I use conventional stock making techniques with a big pot... When I have heaps of bones (with most meat, fat, edible connective tissue having already been roasted and eaten, stock made etc), I put them on stovetop with water and red wine vinegar (or any vinegar) and have on a rolling boil for a very long time. For me it usually takes about two days or a little longer to render the bones edible. This is really all there is to it. ;)

Turn down the heat to low at night, top up the water sporadically and have on high during the day. Whatever fat is left on bones is emulsified through the stock (there might be risk of oxidation here but hey), and if there's any connective tissue remaining on the bones then the end (liquid) product wil be gelatinous as well as (possibly) quite tasty. Re the bones, I have to say some of the watery ones are quite tasty with a bit of salt, although like you say they generally aren't much of a meal in conventional terms. Are you aware of calorie yield by the way? They seem to be mainly water, tissue that is difficult for the human body to digest. I can say they're quite filling but doesn't seem to realte to calories (although it may...)

I started doing stuff with bones a lot relatively frequently, a few months ago. My teeth were looking a bit worse for wear, despite being brushed and me attempting to generally 'live well' etc. I suspect I wasn't eating enough calcium however (don't eat dairy and it takes a lot of leafy greens, canned salmon to get any significant amount). My teeth have returned to their previous clean, shining state in correlatation me eating bones though...

By the way you may know already but if not: one risks exposure to heavy metals that have accumulated in the bones, and the calcium phosphate is not particularly bioavalable at least compared with other forms of calcium (and can neutralise stomach acid to boot. Despite these things, I agree that they are valuable addition to diet, particularly for people who don't eat dairy foods...

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 23, 2013
at 11:30 AM

That's pretty awesome what you said about your n=1 for your teeth. It turns out the calcium phosphate in bones is called hydroxyapatite and while it's seemingly true that hydroxyapatite has a lower absorption rate than many calcium salts when compared using loading tests, it actually outperforms calcium salts in preventing bone thinning and promoting bone growth in clinical trials. See my answer here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/196743/will-eating-bones-make-my-bones-bigger#axzz2U74lsfbw .

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on May 24, 2013
at 08:57 AM

That is great to know, thanks. Certainly helps to further explain my teeth getting better. 'Eat what ails you' indeed, eastern medicine gets another feather in its cap. So too whole foods...

3
Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on May 23, 2013
at 04:39 AM

I often eat the bones from my bone broth. Chicken, pork, and lamb bones readily soften from long cooking or pressure cooking.

I highly recommend a pressure cooker -- it makes these smaller bones soft enough to nibble on in about 30 minutes. Super fast bone broth, too! I got the idea here:

http://nomnompaleo.com/post/16004110328/quick-pressure-cooker-bone-broth

If you get a pressure cooker, it's better to get one at least 6 quarts, because it can only be partially filled. I first bought a 4 qt and it was way too small for broth.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 23, 2013
at 11:13 AM

That's awesome, I have a 22 qt stainless steel pot and a slow cooker but it makes since that a pressure cooker would make bones softer quicker, I plan to get on of those today along with some fish bones.

1
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on May 24, 2013
at 01:16 PM

Sardines are a really easy way to get bones into your diet. In fact, even conventional eating wisdom recommends it as a way to get calcium. The bones are soft and easily digested and the other ingredients can help with calcium absorption (Reference needed).

1
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on May 24, 2013
at 01:10 PM

Canned salmon with the bones in are really easy for me to eat.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!