2

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Reaction To Bone Broth

Commented on May 26, 2015
Created June 20, 2012 at 5:05 PM

I follow a paleo lifestyle and eat a large amount of organic butter. Recently I made a 3 day bone broth. I had 3 big bowls for dinner and woke up that night, after 3 hours, with a rapid heart beat, acidic taste repeating on me as well as an urgent need to empty my bowels. Can you eat too much bone broth and overload on thd minerals it contains, especially when eating a large amount of fats? Or, are there something wrong with the bones and therefore the broth itself?

7239a39d8edbd5a445d493c32b62244f

(0)

on May 26, 2015
at 07:36 PM

I had my first 1/4 cup of chicken bone broth yesterday; I simmered the bones, onion, and garlic for 24 hours and added some ginger for the last fews hours. I gave some to a friend. We both had the same reaction of a racing heart beat. I do not think the reaction has to do with the amount. Is it safe to be drinking this if this is the reaction one gets???????????????

8311e984dff8a7bea6e30a75cd7cc30f

(70)

on June 21, 2012
at 06:00 AM

It would bd interesting to survey how many others observe an adverse reaction when they have bone broth.

8311e984dff8a7bea6e30a75cd7cc30f

(70)

on June 21, 2012
at 05:58 AM

Is bone broth loaded with histamine?

8311e984dff8a7bea6e30a75cd7cc30f

(70)

on June 21, 2012
at 05:57 AM

I simmered beef bones for 3 days. Before I used them for broth, I roasted them prior and never noticed any putrid smell.

8311e984dff8a7bea6e30a75cd7cc30f

(70)

on June 21, 2012
at 05:50 AM

I think you've got it. For some time I have been regularly taking high vitamin butter oils and fermented cod liver oil. Along with my oils i also consume a substantial quantity of organic butter. I gather 3 bowls of strongly "brewed" bone broth overloaded my system, especially with calcium. From now on I'm going to be very cautious imbibing this stuff. Sally Fallon and Chris Masterjohn need to be educating people about this.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on June 20, 2012
at 05:22 PM

It's a lot of protein, right? Could be promoting hypoglycemia, maybe.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on June 20, 2012
at 05:11 PM

Could be food poisoning. If the temp drops too low while cooking, you can have bacterial growth. I boil my broth before drinking just in case.

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8 Answers

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1
9225c8e3ea353a2c604cacd62506047d

on June 20, 2012
at 07:15 PM

Not trying to be negative in any way, shape or form but longer-term some people might not necessarily benefit from such practices (full-text):

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3279073/

Abstract:

"Hypercalcaemia is most commonly caused by primary hyperparathyroidism or malignancy. Vitamin D intoxication, also a cause of hypercalcaemia, is mostly caused by excessive administration of vitamin D-containing medications and excessive intake of foods fortified with vitamin D. We present a young cricketer, with recurrent vomiting due to hypercalcaemia and hypervitaminosis D, who used to drink large volumes of soup prepared by boiling long beef bones, for many months. This case presentation highlights the importance of in-depth dietary history for arriving at proper diagnosis".

8311e984dff8a7bea6e30a75cd7cc30f

(70)

on June 21, 2012
at 05:50 AM

I think you've got it. For some time I have been regularly taking high vitamin butter oils and fermented cod liver oil. Along with my oils i also consume a substantial quantity of organic butter. I gather 3 bowls of strongly "brewed" bone broth overloaded my system, especially with calcium. From now on I'm going to be very cautious imbibing this stuff. Sally Fallon and Chris Masterjohn need to be educating people about this.

0
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on September 22, 2014
at 07:30 AM

 I don't actually like broth thats been cooked that long. I prefer a 12 hour slow cooked broth, or even better, 1 hour in a pressure cooker. I always think a longer cooked broth has a funky, unpleasant taste which makes me not wat to drink it - possibly something leaching out of the bones which it might be better not to have?

 

Why not try a much shorter cook (if it gels in the fridge it is still chock full of goodness) and see if you have the same reaction?

0
Medium avatar

on September 20, 2014
at 04:57 PM

It’s the cooking method that’s producing the excess glutamates and histamine.  The folks at Mission: Heirloom do a fantastic job of explaining this issue.  Modifying your cooking methods for proteins can minimize the amount of glutamates and other harmful proteins that are produced from high-heat cooking.  You can read more about it in this on their website:

- search Mission: Heirloom
- click on their IN THE KITCHEN link in the top right corner
- and type in the search bar:  Eliminating Toxins in Protein

They also briefly explain the process on Chris Kresser's podcast titled "A Sneak Peek into the Future of Food Production".  You can listen to the podcast episode or read the written transcript at on his site if you search this title. 

0
Abf0b6d5e20906f742fd600887292c15

on January 29, 2013
at 08:17 PM

I also get it, according to this article it's from free glutamates.

http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/stock-vs-broth-are-you-confused

0
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on June 20, 2012
at 07:30 PM

Yeah, that would basically happen to me if I ate three bowls of the stuff at once. I've never been particularly successful in incorporating it in my life, though I can handle a cup or so, especially if I have it with other food. So, I don't think your broth is bad, but that there is some reason some of us can't digest it properly.

8311e984dff8a7bea6e30a75cd7cc30f

(70)

on June 21, 2012
at 06:00 AM

It would bd interesting to survey how many others observe an adverse reaction when they have bone broth.

0
153c4e4a22734ded15bf4eb35b448e85

(762)

on June 20, 2012
at 05:12 PM

That sounds like a histamine reaction, the body will release a ton of adrenalin to help with the histamine (rapid heartbeat, waking up), also the need to empty your bowels is a histamine reaction as well.

8311e984dff8a7bea6e30a75cd7cc30f

(70)

on June 21, 2012
at 05:58 AM

Is bone broth loaded with histamine?

0
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 20, 2012
at 05:11 PM

One of the recipes I'm looking at for 3 day bone broth says to only cook it off and on during those 3 days. If you followed one with that recommendation you quite likely have food poisoning.

0
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on June 20, 2012
at 05:11 PM

what do you mean by a 3 day bone broth? did you cook it for 3 days or did you make a 3 day supply? I'm just wondering if it might have gone bad if cooked for 3 days????

I have, however left bones in the crock pot for 6 days and just keep topping off with water, to keep in constant supply, but I've never had it gone bad as its always very very hot.....

did you use the bones from one chicken, or one animal? fresh, frozen? a bit more details about the broth and bones and hopefully we can figure it out.

8311e984dff8a7bea6e30a75cd7cc30f

(70)

on June 21, 2012
at 05:57 AM

I simmered beef bones for 3 days. Before I used them for broth, I roasted them prior and never noticed any putrid smell.

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