2

votes

My first bone broth...would love some help!

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 11, 2012 at 1:11 AM

Hello friends,

I have some chicken legs that I bought to make my first bone broth soup with, and I was excited to proceed, but as I did more research, I found that using bones without the meat of the animal is traditional. Oops! I did read one post that seemed to suggest it's ok to leave the chicken on the bone, as long as you cook the chicken first and then remove it, placing the bones back in the pot, and then continuing to cook for several hours to make your broth.

Do I boil the chicken as I normally would, for about an hour, and then let it cool, remove the meat, let the bones sit for an hour in water with lemon juice, then simmer the bones for 6-12 hours? Does boiling the chicken for an hour harm the bones or create msg? What is the best way to do this to ensure I get the best health benefits?

Thank you so much and have a beautiful day!

Rachel

217fc6ef1b76bf244bcb22b3e5c5841c

(178)

on February 08, 2013
at 04:22 PM

Yes you can freeze it, but make sure it is an airtight container and not plastic. I also recommend freezing it in the quantity that you will use it, this way you are not in the situation of trying to break apart a frozen stock for usage.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on July 26, 2012
at 07:09 PM

Yes you can freeze it - highly recommended. It is only good for about a week in the fridge.

366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on July 11, 2012
at 12:24 PM

Mollyboo, I only tried it once, and I can't remember! I should try again with your splash of ACV.

633d3e6b6662b68ad9c6946a0176af61

(50)

on July 11, 2012
at 03:45 AM

Tumeric - love that idea. I have some buffalo soup bones I need to use up. I will try your spice combination next time. Thanks!

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on July 11, 2012
at 03:08 AM

I put way more and I can't taste it.

633d3e6b6662b68ad9c6946a0176af61

(50)

on July 11, 2012
at 02:54 AM

Good point on the feet. I'm curious how much ACV you're putting in that you can taste it. I just put a TBSP or two in for a big pot.

  • A1e5be8c6a26bca14e64457ad488a050

    asked by

    (10)
  • Views
    7.3K
  • Last Activity
    1429D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

7 Answers

6
0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

on July 11, 2012
at 02:18 AM

After extensive testing, I found that chicken bones are the worst for making any type of broth or gelatin. They don't gel up and generally there's less nutrition in them.

My best advice would be to go to your butcher, ask for NECK bones or FEET (actual pigs feet or beef feet bones.) Most butchers throw this stuff away and you will be able to get it for pennies on the dollar or even for free. Every few weeks, I go to my butcher and ask him for bones and he gives me a huge bag of them. I have an entire shelf in my freezer devoted to bones. I have lamb neck bones, lamb knee bones, pigs feet, and beef neck bones.) Every time I use these to make my broth, my bone broth gels up and I make quality gelatin. Ideally, you want bones with a bit of meat on them and bones with visible cartilage and marrow.

If you want to make a good bone broth or gelatin:


  1. Place the bones in a pie tin or cooking tray and place it in the oven and roast at 200 degrees for 30 minutes.
  2. Get enough bones to fill the entire bottom of a crockpot with. You should not be able to see the bottom of the pot.
  3. Smash some of the softer bones with a hammer. Alternatively, you can ask your butcher to cut them open for you so the marrow is exposed.
  4. Place all of the bones in the crockpot.
  5. Fill up the crockpot almost entirely with water. Leave about an inch from the top so it doesn't boil over.
  6. Add 1 tablespoon ACV or balsamic vinegar for every 2 cups of water.
  7. Add generous amounts of Himalayan crystal salt or celtic sea salt.
  8. Add a few tablespoons of garlic powder or one clove of garlic.
  9. Add fresh or dried anise.
  10. Add a "twig" of rosemary. Dried rosemary works too.
  11. Add a generous amount of black peppercorns. If you want an antioxidant boost, add a small amount of turmeric. The turmeric and pepper work in a synergistic manner.
  12. Bring to a slow boil and keep it like that for a few minutes.
  13. After a few minutes, you should see an off-white foam rising to the top. Get a ladle and skim the scum out quickly.
  14. Reduce heat as much as possible and keep it simmering gently for at least 4 hours. Do NOT keep the broth boiling. You can even do it overnight. I have a gas stove and my house never blew up when making bone broth for extended periods of time.

633d3e6b6662b68ad9c6946a0176af61

(50)

on July 11, 2012
at 03:45 AM

Tumeric - love that idea. I have some buffalo soup bones I need to use up. I will try your spice combination next time. Thanks!

4
633d3e6b6662b68ad9c6946a0176af61

on July 11, 2012
at 01:33 AM

I do bone broth once a week because I like to make a chicken soup from it that becomes a quick and easy meal for me during the week.

After cooking a small chicken, I'll pick off all the skin and meat that I can, but I don't spend a lot of time on it, so there may be some meat left. I put the carcass in a pot and cover with enough filtered water to cover. I add a splash of apple cider vinegar, as well as some peppercorns and sea salt. The vinegar will you get the most from the bones and marrow. I bring it to a boil and once there, let it boil only for about 5 minutes. I then turn it down to simmer for 12-24 hours depending on how much I have cooking. You can even do this in the crock pot. Check out this link for perpetual bone broth: http://nourishedkitchen.com/perpetual-soup-the-easiest-bone-broth-youll-make/ This is something I will do sometime when I don't have small kids around.

Once the broth is made, I strain out the chunks and return the broth to the pot. Then I add cooked chicken, celery, onion, carrots, minced garlic, and salt and pepper. I cook this until the carrots are softened. Voila, chicken soup!

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on March 24, 2014
at 03:49 AM

Don't overthink it. I buy some chicken wings, some leg quarters, and throw them in the pot with carrot, onion, celery, salt, cover with water, press the button (electric pressure cooker), and come back an hour or so later to the most beautiful, clear, gelatinous pot of wonder.

I strain out the solids and let the broth cool so I can skim most (but not all!) the fat, then drink bowls full with the chicken meat and carrot and celery back in (often with zucchini or shiritake noodles). Yummy, yummy, yum, yum, yum! Just like grandma used to make.

I freeze extra broth in serving sizes (ice cube trays and 2 cup containers) to use for cooking throughout the week. Little effort, little time, big nutritional bang for the buck.

0
880fa2987dfb0d47085045a27909549f

on March 23, 2014
at 07:39 PM

I usually save all my bones in the freezer after they've provided a meal. I also buy bones from the butcher. The chicken carcasses from the butcher still have a lot of meat on them. I'll add them to the slow cooker with onion ends, carrot ends, and celery that I've saved for this purpose in the fridge. Add about 1T apple cider vinegar, and 1t salt, and fill it with cold water. You can leave it for about 24hrs, let it cool, and strain it. You can also use a whole chicken, or chicken pieces. Many meal planners recommend this so you can make stock for soups, and shredded chicken for meals later in the week, at the same time. My stock does gel in the fridge, so I know it's good stuff, unlike store bought stuff.

0
D7bfae04b3685d458c772174768bb301

on March 23, 2014
at 05:09 PM

I've found the legs work fine for stock, but I make smaller batches for poultry. To get more gelatin out, I've found(entirely by mistake but was an ah-ha moment) letting the bones sit in liquid(from the boiled legs) overnight with small amount acid(vinegar or lemon juice) in fridge and then letting them low simmer for the afternoon = chicken jello when cooled. Lol, first time it happened I was like Eww gross until I realized what I had and ever since that trick has worked(cooling and letting sit up to 24hrs then cooking).

0
49d1320cc71e4228b14621d2858c1252

on July 26, 2012
at 07:07 PM

I made the bone broths and turned out great. I made half of it into chicken soup and I am saving the other half for another time. Does anyone know if I can freeze the broth, or how long it keeps in the fridge?

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on July 26, 2012
at 07:09 PM

Yes you can freeze it - highly recommended. It is only good for about a week in the fridge.

217fc6ef1b76bf244bcb22b3e5c5841c

(178)

on February 08, 2013
at 04:22 PM

Yes you can freeze it, but make sure it is an airtight container and not plastic. I also recommend freezing it in the quantity that you will use it, this way you are not in the situation of trying to break apart a frozen stock for usage.

0
366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on July 11, 2012
at 02:14 AM

If you are talking about the amount of meat that is on a chicken foot (or backs/wings), don't worry about it. Anyway, meat adds some flavor to the broth -- so far as I know (but am waiting to be corrected) the reason people generally remove the meat first is to eat it. Once you make broth, the meat will be too tough to eat. If all I have is bare bones, I usually add a few wings or backs anyway.

My recipe:

Put bones & parts in crockpot with 1 or 2 carrots, 1 or 2 stalks celery, 1 onion cut into 8ths, 10-15 peppercorns. Cover w/ water, cook on low 10-12 hours, add bay leaf, cook a couple more hours. Strain, chill overnight and scrape off fat if desired.

Mollyboo is right that the vinegar will help to get all the minerals out of the bones, but I don't like the flavor so I skip it.

Editing: now I see that you said chicken legs, not chicken feet. The problem with legs is just that you will need lots of them to get enough bones. I'd tend to cook those any way you like to eat them, save the bones, and keep doing that until you have the equivalent of a pot full of bones. If you want a broth that gels nicely, add a few chicken feet, if you want more flavor, add backs/wings.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on July 11, 2012
at 03:08 AM

I put way more and I can't taste it.

633d3e6b6662b68ad9c6946a0176af61

(50)

on July 11, 2012
at 02:54 AM

Good point on the feet. I'm curious how much ACV you're putting in that you can taste it. I just put a TBSP or two in for a big pot.

366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on July 11, 2012
at 12:24 PM

Mollyboo, I only tried it once, and I can't remember! I should try again with your splash of ACV.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!