4

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Bone Broth in Slow Cooker?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 12, 2013 at 3:58 PM

Do any of you make bone broth in a slow cooker? If so, how do you go about it?

My electric oven/hob is too unreliable to set a low heat & keep it that way for 24 hours so i thought of buying a cheapish slow cooker & using that instead, would come in handy for slow cooking beef currys too ;)

D8f10efbb2da1d53290a4dad3ee58f00

(207)

on February 02, 2014
at 04:57 AM

Our local Mexican supermarkets sell chicken feet. Perfect for chicken broth!

B694589acf7e0482c9a17466edbe4178

on February 01, 2014
at 06:28 PM

I made the beef broth in a slow cooker and it smelled awful while cooking and tasted awful when done. I like the poultry bones better makes a nice rich broth. I use turkey carcasses that I save in the freezer of roast chicken carcasses. I love it. I do it in the slow cooker with a glug of apple cider vinegar and cook for 24 hours. Maybe it doesn't have as much marrow but the collagen is really great. Nice thick gel when cold could probably make a nice chicken salad mold with it in summer time.

99b61607fc739e775e9052c319c7d008

(0)

on January 14, 2014
at 11:40 PM

I know this is old, but what do you mean by "however long it takes for the bones to be completely clean." What does clean mean for bones?

I've been doing it for about 8 hours, emptying the crock, and then refilling with more water. Not sure if I'd be better off doing just one batch but for longer.

99b61607fc739e775e9052c319c7d008

(0)

on January 14, 2014
at 11:39 PM

I know this is old, but what do you mean by "however long it takes for the bones to be completely clean." What does clean mean for bones? I've been doing it for about 8 hours, emptying the crock, and then refilling with more water. Not sure if I'd be better off doing just one batch but for longer.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on April 18, 2013
at 02:38 PM

do you find it still gels even thought its 'cleaner'? also any difference in taste if you didn't boil/throw away the first batch of water?

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on April 18, 2013
at 02:37 PM

I shall generally be doing this i think, a perpetual broth and just take a mug of it when i please, if its tasting really nice i'll take a jar out & freeze it.

74786bbe8254844304a33943290c4d6d

(1663)

on April 13, 2013
at 01:45 PM

Yes, and in a fairly generous amount. It was only after I liberally started added ACV to my broths and cooking 'em for 24+ hrs that I finally had softened bones. I never used enough before.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on April 13, 2013
at 08:21 AM

i already have a pressure cooker but my electric hob is unreliable at constant heat & the pressure cooker is damn loud too, im going to pick up a slow cooker today, going for a 3.5ltr one as im a single guy, im suprised how cheap it is, started saving some lamb rack bones last night, can't wait til ive got enough to make a good broth!

Fce356005a83353009c11567c217a9bd

on April 13, 2013
at 02:23 AM

ACV is an absolute must!

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on April 12, 2013
at 04:22 PM

thats sounds absolutely incredible, thanks for the reply

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15 Answers

3
43e6e312fcc6b2cd2238e7898ad50480

on April 12, 2013
at 08:57 PM

I always do mine in the slow cooker. I just put the bones in, sometimes with some carrots and onions, sometimes without, always with a good big glug of apple cider vinegar, sea salt and a couple of bay leaves. Then I add enough cold water to just cover the bones. The best part is about 24 hours in, when I grab a spoon and go bone marrow hunting :)

For beef broth I give it 36 hours, for pork broth 24 hours. I find that they both gel just fine in that time - especially the pork broth. That stuff is thick!

Cool in the fridge overnight, skim the fat off the top and there's your broth underneath. I keep the beef fat to cook with.

D8f10efbb2da1d53290a4dad3ee58f00

(207)

on February 02, 2014
at 04:57 AM

Our local Mexican supermarkets sell chicken feet. Perfect for chicken broth!

3
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 12, 2013
at 04:16 PM

In the cool weather season, I do the majority of my cooking in the slow cooker. I live in a hot climate and in the hot season I don't use it as much.

I buy beef bones, marrow bones and (if I can find them) sliced feet. That mixture produces a nice fatty, gummy bone broth which is essential.

I start with the batch of bones mostly covered by water and slow-cook for 18-24 hours or however long it takes for the bones to be completely clean. There should be nothing on or inside them. If you just want broth, you're done. I prefer to make stew, so I keep going.

Once I remove the bones I decide whether to add additional meat. If there were plenty of meat scraps on the bones, fine, but if there weren't I might add stew beef chunks or chopped chuck or whatever lean beef was on sale.

If meat was added, I continue slow-cooking until the meat is nearly cooked and I add whatever tubers I want--rutabagas, celery root, sweet/white potatoes, carrots, etc. When they are getting fork-tender I add celery and onion.

Once that's fully cooked, and all the additions usually take most of a day, the basic stew is done. I let it cool thoroughly, usually eating a large bowl while I wait, and then I put the stew in the fridge. Each time I reheat some or all of it, I add additional veggies such as broccoli, brussels sprouts or cabbage, etc. Any veggie you like.

After a few meals, if I still have quite a bit of stew left I freeze individual portions and, as before, each time I defrost some I add other vegetables or leftovers so it's a different meal each time.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on April 12, 2013
at 04:22 PM

thats sounds absolutely incredible, thanks for the reply

99b61607fc739e775e9052c319c7d008

(0)

on January 14, 2014
at 11:40 PM

I know this is old, but what do you mean by "however long it takes for the bones to be completely clean." What does clean mean for bones?

I've been doing it for about 8 hours, emptying the crock, and then refilling with more water. Not sure if I'd be better off doing just one batch but for longer.

99b61607fc739e775e9052c319c7d008

(0)

on January 14, 2014
at 11:39 PM

I know this is old, but what do you mean by "however long it takes for the bones to be completely clean." What does clean mean for bones? I've been doing it for about 8 hours, emptying the crock, and then refilling with more water. Not sure if I'd be better off doing just one batch but for longer.

2
7fb5e7849c5d9d8ebdfa9d36786b1fe9

(178)

on April 12, 2013
at 04:17 PM

I always make my broth in the slow cooker. I add fatty, cartilaginous, and gelatinous bones, cover with water, add about a T of salt and some whole black peppercorns, then simmer for 24-48hours. I let it cool, strain, and seperate a weeks worth and freeze the rest. After sitting in the fridge over night, the fat layer has formed on the top and the gelatin matrix has set nicely.

1
De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

on April 18, 2013
at 11:08 AM

I ordered what i thought was a few bones, and looooads of bones just arrived at my workplace, they look great, really fatty/juicy/jointy & some skin on them

Gonna have to defrost half my freezer to get them in there, well overdue anyway.

I hear a lot its best to roast beef bones before making stock as it can smell/taste funky otherwise. I live in a studio flat so will be sleeping metres away from the slow cooker i hope i can stand the smell.

I got a pigs foot aswell which is exciting, not sure it'll fit in the 3.5 ltr slow cooker i've ordered i may have to hack it up a bit or order a bigger slow cooker, all these bones are big uns.

I think i'll do beef bones first, roasted for an hour & may eat some marrow before throwing them in the SC if the marrow is ready after roasting, then ill just take a cup to drink over the next few days to see how the flavor develops

1
5d811a79eb2ccb1045fa7c6fd9ceb686

on April 13, 2013
at 06:14 PM

Before putting the bones in the slow cooker I boil them for 5 minutes on the hob, which produces a disgusting froth. Then I throw away that water and if the bones have gunky bits on them I rinse them clean under running water. Then I put the bones in the slow cooker with hot water and whatever else I???m using.

I find that first boiling and discarding of the water gives a cleaner stock. I start the slow cooker with hot water because I???m not sure how safe it would be to cool the bones down for a prolonged period after the initial boiling, given that the stock I use will also be cooled and then heated again.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on April 18, 2013
at 02:38 PM

do you find it still gels even thought its 'cleaner'? also any difference in taste if you didn't boil/throw away the first batch of water?

1
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on April 13, 2013
at 08:02 AM

I have been making bone broth in a slow cooker for YEARS. Then a few weeks (months? Time goes so quickly) ago, I was clearing out and finding things to give to charity shops. One was a stainless steel pressure cooker. I decided, before giving it away, to try bone broth in it. Amazing! I made broth in one and a quarter hours that would have taken 24 hours in the slow cooker. And it was far better - much more gelatinous and good flavour.

Now, I use the slow cooker for large beef bones which won't fit in the pressure cooker, and for rendering down minced (ground) fat to make lard and I use the pressure cooker for all smaller bones.

I also prefer the taste of lemon juice as an addition to the stock rather than apple cider vinegar...

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on April 13, 2013
at 08:21 AM

i already have a pressure cooker but my electric hob is unreliable at constant heat & the pressure cooker is damn loud too, im going to pick up a slow cooker today, going for a 3.5ltr one as im a single guy, im suprised how cheap it is, started saving some lamb rack bones last night, can't wait til ive got enough to make a good broth!

1
74786bbe8254844304a33943290c4d6d

on April 12, 2013
at 09:53 PM

I only do it in the crock pot now. I make 'indefinite' broth as I can keep adding water to it as I take some out for soup, rice or whatever. Eventually the broth isn't as flavourful as the first batch.

I roast my bones first until they're nice and dark. They'll smell AMAZING! I'll put these in the crockpot first, then I add plenty of apple cider vinegar, whole cloves of garlic, some onion, carrots, and celery, plenty of salt and cover with water. If I have any seaweed on hand, I'll add a bit of it too. Then I cook it for 8 - 10 hours. When it goes to 'warm' I just turn it back on again. Repeat for another 8 - 10 hours.

Fce356005a83353009c11567c217a9bd

on April 13, 2013
at 02:23 AM

ACV is an absolute must!

74786bbe8254844304a33943290c4d6d

(1663)

on April 13, 2013
at 01:45 PM

Yes, and in a fairly generous amount. It was only after I liberally started added ACV to my broths and cooking 'em for 24+ hrs that I finally had softened bones. I never used enough before.

De1095b2ba29c1035f00428cbfe3cc7c

(777)

on April 18, 2013
at 02:37 PM

I shall generally be doing this i think, a perpetual broth and just take a mug of it when i please, if its tasting really nice i'll take a jar out & freeze it.

0
D8f10efbb2da1d53290a4dad3ee58f00

(207)

on February 02, 2014
at 05:04 AM

for gelatin laden broth I recommend getting knuckles and such. The beef broth made from say 2 shanks turns brown. I toss out the meat or give it to the dog ;-)

I haven't tried pork bones yet.

I start with cold water, bones, salt, apple cider vinegar, fresh garlic cloves. Maybe some fresh herbs if I had some in my csa box. I start on High heat for 8 hours then bring it down to slow for a total of 24-36 hours, depending on the size of the bones I'm using. Chicken bones needed to shortest amount of time.

I use a large sieve to transfer the finished broth into several mason jars, let it cool down. Only after that has cooled down, I scrape off the fat layer on top. I often pop it in freezer without taking off fat. shrug

0
A4187a24f59f24168edfc71ff42b5b22

on February 01, 2014
at 06:09 PM

Oh, dear, I tried making this, and my house smelled awful, the broth tasted awful, and I was really disappointed. I tossed some bones in my slow cooker, added water to cover, and a little salt. I like the taste of beef so I thought it would be great. Not so! Next time I am going to roast the bones, and add some salt, pepper, carrots, celery, and lemon juice. Suggestions welcome!

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on December 28, 2013
at 01:11 AM

I highly recommend you spend a few more dollars and get an electric pressure cooker. Most are "multi-taskers". I bought the "Instant Pot" and I couldn't be happier--besides working as an electric pressure cooker, it also slow cooks. steams, sautees, and it makes rice. It has a timer for delayed cooking and a keep warm function. I love mine.

The best part is that for bone broth, I dump in the bones, an onion, some celery, carrot and water, press the button, walk away for an hour, and come back to the Best. Bone. Broth. EVER! Clear, flavorful, gelled. Best ever!

0
B694589acf7e0482c9a17466edbe4178

on December 27, 2013
at 11:12 PM

Are your bones from regular beef or grass fed?

0
B694589acf7e0482c9a17466edbe4178

on December 27, 2013
at 11:12 PM

Does everyone buy organic grass fed meats?

0
16846467115e18d283565a19c374ee07

(323)

on April 13, 2013
at 09:10 PM

I've made it a few times in the slow cooker and it comes out great! Just remember to add some vinegar as the acidity helps extract a lot of the minerals from the bone (I might try using a citrus fruit next time I make it). Super easy and makes delicious broth. i also throw in a quartered onion and some tubers for flavor.

0
1d9af5db8833413037be3ac48964714f

on April 13, 2013
at 02:34 AM

I keep a bag for bones in my freezer. Whenever a meal produces some bones (other than poultry, which I tend to use to make soup separately), I throw them in the bag. I don't bother removing fat. When I have enough bones, I put them in the slow cooker covered in water. After 8 hours I take out the first batch of broth. Then I add more water and some cider vinegar. A day later I have the second batch of broth. I freeze some and use the rest within a week. I never bother skimming the fat.

0
Fce356005a83353009c11567c217a9bd

on April 13, 2013
at 02:22 AM

+1 for roasting first. I added beef cheeks to my last batch. Give the meat to Fido.

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