3

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What to do with soup bones - Assume my complete ignorance

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 12, 2011 at 11:13 PM

I just finally picked up my half of a side of grass fed beef. Very exciting. There are several vacuum packed bags of soup bones, cut to manageable sizes.

Assume I'm a completely ignorant fool having never messed with bones or broths in the kitchen. How do I get the most out of it? How to make bone broth? (Yes I really asked that question). I love marrow, fat, soup, broth, all that stuff. What do I do step by step? Do I cook the bones first for the marrow and then make broth from the bones? Carve meat off first? Is there a similar thread on this already?

Also, we are just starting our 6 month old on solid foods. I presume bone broth can be added into her mix without concern?

8be7a492e2844e2ad5595a6c73974f99

(891)

on July 14, 2011
at 04:09 PM

@Aaron...meat that has been cooked for that long (for 24 hours, say) is tough to digest...my understanding is that the protein molecules get closer and closer together. Also, my experience says it's not such a great idea. I thought I was being so economical, but overcooked meat was my only source of protein and it really did a number on me.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on July 14, 2011
at 11:18 AM

Good question- I'm not sure! If you can't find out for sure, you can leave it out and you'll still have good stuff, just not quite as rich in minerals. I know the lady that writes the Cheeseslave blog is a parent and big into broth; might be a good place to check.

A2fe5bbd09c7804fd321e9e9a9f9d199

(1614)

on July 14, 2011
at 05:26 AM

wow, so like 550 deg for 25-30 minutes? then slow cooker after that. i'll try that but can't imagine the bones/meat not getting annihilated in that kind of heat for that long.

A2fe5bbd09c7804fd321e9e9a9f9d199

(1614)

on July 14, 2011
at 05:22 AM

That sounds really good. Any idea if bone broth made with ACV or lemon is okay to feed to a 6 month old as part of first foods? I was told avoiding citrus is important but I don't know if this would count.

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on July 13, 2011
at 11:20 AM

Why not eat the meat? Granted, it's going to be soft and a lot of the flavor will be cooked out of it, so you wouldn't serve it by itself as a main dish or anything, but I use it in soups and casseroles. Is there some other reason?

A2fe5bbd09c7804fd321e9e9a9f9d199

(1614)

on July 12, 2011
at 11:46 PM

Awesome details, thank you !

8be7a492e2844e2ad5595a6c73974f99

(891)

on July 12, 2011
at 11:27 PM

apple cider vinegar.

A2fe5bbd09c7804fd321e9e9a9f9d199

(1614)

on July 12, 2011
at 11:23 PM

Sounds easy. Thanks. What's ACV?

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5 Answers

2
8be7a492e2844e2ad5595a6c73974f99

(891)

on July 12, 2011
at 11:32 PM

here is a copy-paste dealio and i recommend it.

i used to eat the meat after it had been cooked along with the bones...big mistake. don't do that. and don't learn the hard way.

i recommend browning the bones first and then pulling what meat you can off, then proceeding from there.

regarding marrow...you can either eat it or boil it. either way, you will be getting good stuff. i found it really adds to the broth, but you can experiment. looks like you have a lot to work with! enjoy!

Mineral???Rich Bone Broth

Ingredients

Use bones leftover from cooked chicken, turkey, etc. or from whole chicken, pig's feet or hocks, beef bones, etc. Chicken feet are particularly rich in gelatin so they can be added to the pot or used to make broth all by themselves, or use bones with meat attached. Non-chlorinated water. Acidic medium, i.e. unpasteurized unfiltered apple cider vinegar or freshly squeezed lemon juice. Preparation Before Cooking

Poultry: Use about 2 to 3 pounds of bony parts, chicken feet, or 1 medium-sized whole chicken. Cut up whole chicken into several smaller pieces. Put them into a pot large enough to cover them with water by 2 inches (leave at least 1 inch from the top of the pot because the volume expands somewhat during cooking). For every 4 quarts of water add 2 tablespoons of acidic medium, i.e. unpasteurized unfiltered apple cider vinegar or freshly squeezed lemon juice. Let it stand for 30 minutes to 1 hour.

Beef, Lamb, Pork or Venison: Use about 4 pounds of bones with or without meat. Brown the meaty bones first, and add them, along with fats and juices from browning, into a pot large enough to cover them with water by 2 inches (leave at least 1 inch from the top of the pot because the volume expands somewhat during cooking). For every 4 quarts of water add 1/2 cup of acidic medium, i.e. unpasteurized unfiltered apple cider vinegar or freshly squeezed lemon juice. Let it stand 1 hour. Cooking

Bring the meat and bones to a boil. Reduce heat to medium???low, and simmer, covered, until the meat attached to the bones is cooked. Skim off any foam that rises to the top, which are impurities. When the meat is fully cooked remove it from the bones, to be used in sandwiches or other dishes or added back into the bone broth after it is done. Put the bones back into the water and continue simmering ??? see cooking times for the different kinds of bones below. Let it cool slightly, and remove any big bones with a large slotted spoon. Strain the remaining liquid and store until needed in the refrigerator. If you do not plan to use it within 3 days it can be transferred to covered glass containers and put in the freezer. Cooking Times

NOTE: The longer the cooking time the more minerals are pulled out of the bones. The bones may even become quite soft which are healthy to chew on. Bone marrow from inside the bones is also healthy. Eating pig skin is healthy too, which can be made into cracklings (crispy pork rinds).

Chicken: Reduce heat and simmer covered for 6 to 24 hours. Beef, Lamb, Pork, & Venison: Reduce heat and simmer covered for 12 to 72 hours.

A2fe5bbd09c7804fd321e9e9a9f9d199

(1614)

on July 12, 2011
at 11:46 PM

Awesome details, thank you !

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on July 13, 2011
at 11:20 AM

Why not eat the meat? Granted, it's going to be soft and a lot of the flavor will be cooked out of it, so you wouldn't serve it by itself as a main dish or anything, but I use it in soups and casseroles. Is there some other reason?

8be7a492e2844e2ad5595a6c73974f99

(891)

on July 14, 2011
at 04:09 PM

@Aaron...meat that has been cooked for that long (for 24 hours, say) is tough to digest...my understanding is that the protein molecules get closer and closer together. Also, my experience says it's not such a great idea. I thought I was being so economical, but overcooked meat was my only source of protein and it really did a number on me.

1
24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on July 13, 2011
at 11:58 AM

Last week I filled my crockpot with roasted beef bones, covered with water, added ACV & covered with water, then cooked on low for about 18 hrs. I found that a good bit of water had evaporated, so I put the bones back in and did the whole thing again, cooking for about 24 hrs more. After some time in the fridge, the stock was really thick and gelatinous; moreseo than the last time I'd made broth. I think this is indicative of more nutrients coming out of the bones.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on July 14, 2011
at 11:18 AM

Good question- I'm not sure! If you can't find out for sure, you can leave it out and you'll still have good stuff, just not quite as rich in minerals. I know the lady that writes the Cheeseslave blog is a parent and big into broth; might be a good place to check.

A2fe5bbd09c7804fd321e9e9a9f9d199

(1614)

on July 14, 2011
at 05:22 AM

That sounds really good. Any idea if bone broth made with ACV or lemon is okay to feed to a 6 month old as part of first foods? I was told avoiding citrus is important but I don't know if this would count.

1
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on July 13, 2011
at 07:08 AM

If the bones are raw, then put them on a roasting tin. Preheat oven as high as it will go. Put bones in the oven and cook for 25 / 30 minutes. Take out of oven and allow to cool.

Do you have a slow cooker? If so, put bones in slow cooker. Cover with water and add the juice of a lemon. Switch slow cooker on low and leave for 24 / 30 hours. Voila, soup stock. Do keep checking the level of the water every 5 or 6 hours and top up with boiling water if needed.

If no slow cooker, place in a large saucepan, cover with water, add juice of lemon, bring to a slow simmer and turn down, lid and cook for about 5 / 6 hours - again topping up with boiling water as needed.

Now use the stock (once strained) to make soup. Or just drink as it is - salt, pepper and perhaps some herbs.

A2fe5bbd09c7804fd321e9e9a9f9d199

(1614)

on July 14, 2011
at 05:26 AM

wow, so like 550 deg for 25-30 minutes? then slow cooker after that. i'll try that but can't imagine the bones/meat not getting annihilated in that kind of heat for that long.

1
50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on July 12, 2011
at 11:19 PM

Bone broth is awesome. Throw the bones in a crockpot or stockpot, add some water with a little ACV, and cook on low for as long as desired. I usually do 18 - 24 hours. Remove solids, and you have your stock. You can also add any spices you want. Enjoy

8be7a492e2844e2ad5595a6c73974f99

(891)

on July 12, 2011
at 11:27 PM

apple cider vinegar.

A2fe5bbd09c7804fd321e9e9a9f9d199

(1614)

on July 12, 2011
at 11:23 PM

Sounds easy. Thanks. What's ACV?

0
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on July 12, 2011
at 11:34 PM

Bone broth is great. Here is a link that may help: http://thenourishingcook.com/2009/12/beef-stock-anyone/#

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