2

votes

What to do with beef bones AFTER I've made bone broth?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 17, 2013 at 8:21 PM

I make a pot each week and have a cup every morning to start my day instead of tea. I just wonder what I can do with these bones once I've used them. I feel like they are too solid for putting in my municipal compost pickup even though they accept food scraps they accept rocks, and these bones are solid and heavy! Any ideas out there?

Medium avatar

(389)

on March 06, 2013
at 02:24 PM

Plenty of ideas - I'm thinking a string of huge beef barrow bones with a large knuckle in the center, would make the perfect necklace for parties or goin out to bars... too extreme?

C5c1073ffc65c5b737408d1d6cc68e86

(610)

on March 04, 2013
at 07:07 PM

Aggjc: you beat me to the crafty-side punch. Excellent suggestion though. Hmm...ideas...

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on March 04, 2013
at 02:15 PM

Agreed. Several years as a dog trainer, behavior consultant and shelter volunteer, as well as being something of a dog geek and avid reader on the subject have convinced me that dogs who "do fine" on cooked bones are the lucky ones. Canines evolved to chew up uncooked bones, my dog gets them nearly every day. I'd never give cooked bones to any animal.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 04, 2013
at 01:08 PM

Growing up my dogs always got cooked chicken bones. Never had a problem.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on February 19, 2013
at 01:15 AM

If the dog bones are a good idea, how about sharing the up-vote love? My mom will be very proud if I break 3,800 :-)

A4e3aa5a2fc6aaa93a32fde4973294c6

on February 19, 2013
at 12:18 AM

I've heard that you don't give cooked poultry bones to animals because they splinter but they wont splinter if they are uncooked just like if the animal was hunting for their food. As far as the compost there really wouldn't be problem of contamination because they have been cooked for so long and no soft tissue remains. I have been hesitant to put them in municipal compost due to how large and HARD they are, like baseball sized rocks, which are prohibited. Dog bones is a good idea, any other ideas out there, Internet, of what you have done with your beef bones?

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6 Answers

1
Af9fb225a913b2c8aba0af468ecb7e6d

on March 04, 2013
at 11:41 AM

Cooked bones are very dangerous for pets!

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on March 04, 2013
at 02:15 PM

Agreed. Several years as a dog trainer, behavior consultant and shelter volunteer, as well as being something of a dog geek and avid reader on the subject have convinced me that dogs who "do fine" on cooked bones are the lucky ones. Canines evolved to chew up uncooked bones, my dog gets them nearly every day. I'd never give cooked bones to any animal.

1
7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

on February 18, 2013
at 04:48 AM

I give them to my coworker for his dogs. They love them! Sometimes, he puts peanut butter inside, and they will spend hours trying to tong it out.

Lately, I'll use the bones twice in my bone broths (first time with the marrow). The 2nd time there's no marrow, but I figure there's still plenty of minerals inside.

Mike

PS: I'm told NOT to give chicken bones to dogs. There appears to be a question about chicken feet. I saw a youtube video of a dog munching on chicken feet, but I really don't know.

Mike

A4e3aa5a2fc6aaa93a32fde4973294c6

on February 19, 2013
at 12:18 AM

I've heard that you don't give cooked poultry bones to animals because they splinter but they wont splinter if they are uncooked just like if the animal was hunting for their food. As far as the compost there really wouldn't be problem of contamination because they have been cooked for so long and no soft tissue remains. I have been hesitant to put them in municipal compost due to how large and HARD they are, like baseball sized rocks, which are prohibited. Dog bones is a good idea, any other ideas out there, Internet, of what you have done with your beef bones?

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on February 19, 2013
at 01:15 AM

If the dog bones are a good idea, how about sharing the up-vote love? My mom will be very proud if I break 3,800 :-)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 04, 2013
at 01:08 PM

Growing up my dogs always got cooked chicken bones. Never had a problem.

1
04b157684e2dcfa867ff15db95145652

(325)

on February 18, 2013
at 01:26 AM

I, personally, don't see anything wrong with sending it to the municipal compost pickup.

Most gardening/compost books say to leave out meat products for most backyard gardeners, but there's really nothing wrong with it if the composting is done properly (with the correct ratios of nitrogen and carbon) and there's little chance of cross-contaminating your neighbors with yucky pathogens that haven't been broken down yet (ie, if birds or other local fauna get into your compost bin and spread the non-composted scraps around the neighborhood).

In municipal compost facilities, the chances of things not being broken down correctly and possibly contaminating the neighborhood are drastically mitigated. Bones (even those hefty marrow bones) WILL break down given enough time, heat and the proper c/n ratio.

0
C5c1073ffc65c5b737408d1d6cc68e86

on March 04, 2013
at 07:05 PM

Yes, as Dan pointed out, make more broth!

Bones can be used a few times before they become compost or jewelry (yep, tap into your crafty self to make bone jewelry).

Paul Jaminet, author of The Perfect Health Diet, explains his process on his blog. Clicking this link will take you to that article. In fact, he uses vinegar for his secondary broth (something I have not tried yet). But the point is, each time you make a broth with the same bones, more good stuff is leeched from them.

Give it a try and then let us know how it goes.

mrmirek.blogspot.com

Medium avatar

(389)

on March 06, 2013
at 02:24 PM

Plenty of ideas - I'm thinking a string of huge beef barrow bones with a large knuckle in the center, would make the perfect necklace for parties or goin out to bars... too extreme?

C5c1073ffc65c5b737408d1d6cc68e86

(610)

on March 04, 2013
at 07:07 PM

Aggjc: you beat me to the crafty-side punch. Excellent suggestion though. Hmm...ideas...

0
Medium avatar

(389)

on March 04, 2013
at 07:05 PM

Do like the Indians did and make some paleo bling!

0
8f2d9842fdfec224a425c0f77c4ee34d

(1241)

on March 04, 2013
at 06:30 PM

I say try making another batch broth with them and see how it turns out. A lot of people throw them out prematurely.

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