2

votes

What if you can't get pastured chicken? How bad is regular chicken?

Asked on April 08, 2018
Created June 03, 2011 at 11:29 PM

Pastured whole chickens cost a fortune around these parts. They are about $16/kilo (about $8/pound). Their chicken livers are double that. Even their bones are $8/kilo. Ouch!

I'm trying to eat more beef and other stuff to replace the chicken, but we've always been big on chicken. I'm buying regular chickens, and using regular chicken bones for bone broth. Obviously not ideal.

My question is this: How bad is unpasteured chicken? Not based on assumption, but fact. Does anyone know if there is anything in it that would actually harm us? I can't eat beef liver (too gross). I figure that liver from poorly sourced chickens still has more nutrients than say a can of tuna or a piece of beef (muscle meet). And imperfect bone broth is better than no bone broth.

Thoughts?

P.S. If there is anyone in Israel who knows how to get decent affordable chicken, please let me know.

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on August 18, 2014
at 05:40 PM

The white meat of CAFO chicken tastes like cardboard and has the texture of wet cardboard. No amount of seasoning and sauce can compensate for that.

Medium avatar

(238)

on December 15, 2013
at 06:01 AM

You need to do some serious reading, search for history of domesticated poultry. If Paleo man ate "poultry" it was a wild bird that ate whatever it could find like worms, bugs, anything really. Not unlimited buckets of corn, soy, wheat, barley etc.

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on June 05, 2011
at 06:12 PM

Kosher is about the cleanliness and slaughter, not feeding. Kosher and Halal meat has traditionally been held to a higher standard in that regard than regular meat, but it pales in comparison to pastured. Before I knew anything about pastured meats I sometimes got Kosher chicken because there was possibly less risk of contamination from salmonella, E.coli and things like that.

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on June 05, 2011
at 04:00 PM

It's not a joke if you're strictly religious.

Medium avatar

(3029)

on June 05, 2011
at 01:50 PM

The grass fed beef I buy is imported from South America and frozen. It comes in one big piece. The butcher won't grind it for me. I was never a big beef eater, and the recipies I know call for ground beef, mostly. I am slowly learning how to make new beef dishes, but they are stews that cook for 3 hours. I could buy locally raised "grass-fed" beef is only sort of grass fed and cost a lot more than the frozen beef. That's why I keep eating conventional chicken - I can whip up lots of chicken dishes relatively quickly. Not sure how to solve this one. HELP!

Medium avatar

(3029)

on June 04, 2011
at 05:08 AM

I guess I don't care.

Medium avatar

(3029)

on June 04, 2011
at 04:35 AM

I'm not really worried about the omega 3 issus. When I look at my entired diet, I think I have that covered. The ethical issue is a problem, but I don't know how to solve it right now. Taste-wise, it's what I've always eaten, so I'm not aware of that being a problem.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 04, 2011
at 01:37 AM

I'd pretty much agree, for the muscle meat of said animal. If you want to eat the whole animal and/or the fat then I'd say get pastured for sure. That's why I answered above to eat the breasts skinless if it's a factory bird.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on June 04, 2011
at 12:52 AM

there's a HUGE difference.

4e813fcf7266312684862b945c1c3281

(462)

on June 03, 2011
at 11:48 PM

I have family in Israel, though I live in the US. Are you looking for Kosher chicken, or do you not care?

  • Size75 avatar

    asked by

    (3029)
  • Views
    6.5K
  • Last Activity
    250D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

10 Answers

3
Medium avatar

(19479)

on June 04, 2011
at 12:56 AM

If you compare two chickens, one pastured and one from a factory farm, you won't find too many real nutritional differences.

The factory chicken may have slightly less Omega-3 in it's fat but it's not a drastic difference (the same goes for beef). Factory farm animals are also more likely to be contaminated with feced (e.coli) and other pathogens like salmonella. I even read a news story today about MRSA in some European milk.

Personally, I think that the main differences fall into the categories of evironment, ethics, and taste.

Pasture-fed animals taste MUCH better, lived happier lives, and support the ecosystem within which they are raised.

Factory farmed animals taste like "blah", suffer for their short-life, and produce tremendous amounts of waste that is likely disposed of in irresponsible ways.

Medium avatar

(3029)

on June 04, 2011
at 04:35 AM

I'm not really worried about the omega 3 issus. When I look at my entired diet, I think I have that covered. The ethical issue is a problem, but I don't know how to solve it right now. Taste-wise, it's what I've always eaten, so I'm not aware of that being a problem.

1
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 04, 2011
at 12:59 AM

If you're faced with factory hickens only I'd say eat the white meat only and skip the fat. THe omega six content is a real issue with the dark meat and skin so stick with skinless breasts if it's a factory bird.

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on August 18, 2014
at 05:40 PM

The white meat of CAFO chicken tastes like cardboard and has the texture of wet cardboard. No amount of seasoning and sauce can compensate for that.

0
Medium avatar

on April 08, 2018
at 06:28 PM

Regarding hormones in factory farmed chicken, no chickens raised in the U.S. or internationally, are given hormones. Feeding chickens additional hormones has been illegal in the U.S. since the 1950s, and it’s just not a cost-effective way to raise chickens. Why do some companies label chicken as hormone-free? Chickens have hormones like all living things, but there are no additional hormones given to any chickens, anywhere. The only difference between chicken labeled 'hormone-free' and chicken not labeled as such is how the company chooses to market the product. They are taking advantage of the pervasive myth that chickens are dosed with hormones, and deceiving uninformed consumers that their chicken is better, when the truth is it is exactly the same. Like you will sometimes see bottled water labelled 'Gluten Free!'

Regarding antibiotics, in the first place, the dose is really, really small. In the second place, representatives from every flock are tested for antibiotic residue. That’s why they have the withdrawal period from seven to 14 days before the birds are processed, during which time the chickens are not given any antibiotics to make sure there is none in the meat.

I tried to include a link to some source material for the above, but I'm new here, and can't add links yet, apparently. So I'll just say don't fall for food purists bullcrap. It's based on ideology, not science.

0
3fc95bca9e723edfbbb72b172798ab49

(1354)

on December 15, 2013
at 03:25 PM

Well, I suppose I will speak from anecdote. I eat CAFO chicken. Regularly. It's a huge source of my dietary meat. I am getting back on my feet financially, but it would still be hugely irresponsible of me to spring for meats running 2x+ expensive (whether that be fancy chickens or just eating more ruminants). Any supposed negative effects have not manifested externally. Body recomposition, strength, energy, and general feeling of health are all fantastic. I cannot, however, speak to any internal going-ons as I have not had anything such as a physical, nor blood work, for many years.

0
Af9e23fd927bacc1ad31e83db69f454e

on December 15, 2013
at 05:20 AM

Considering that pasture-raised poultry tends to have an omega ratio not much different than that of factory poultry, and cavemen ate poultry, doesn't that mean that its fine for us to eat fat with a "bad" omega ratio? Cavemen seem to have gotten away with it when they ate poultry.

Medium avatar

(238)

on December 15, 2013
at 06:01 AM

You need to do some serious reading, search for history of domesticated poultry. If Paleo man ate "poultry" it was a wild bird that ate whatever it could find like worms, bugs, anything really. Not unlimited buckets of corn, soy, wheat, barley etc.

0
22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on June 05, 2011
at 11:56 AM

Chris kresser opened my eyes to this. He states that the omega 6 content in conventional chicken, especially the dark meat and skin is very high. There, we I can't get pastorate chicken I choose beef. On occasion we I am out to eat I will get chicken but I have to know that chicken is going to be damn good!

Medium avatar

(3029)

on June 05, 2011
at 01:50 PM

The grass fed beef I buy is imported from South America and frozen. It comes in one big piece. The butcher won't grind it for me. I was never a big beef eater, and the recipies I know call for ground beef, mostly. I am slowly learning how to make new beef dishes, but they are stews that cook for 3 hours. I could buy locally raised "grass-fed" beef is only sort of grass fed and cost a lot more than the frozen beef. That's why I keep eating conventional chicken - I can whip up lots of chicken dishes relatively quickly. Not sure how to solve this one. HELP!

0
58cc17a77bca6e503dcf6bf6471b76a1

(478)

on June 05, 2011
at 04:45 AM

I am on a tight budget now (we both got laid off from work so money is strap for sure) so I just stick to conventional chicken and just like mentioned above, I stick to lean cut skinless breasts and bought more lamb and beef (lean cut) and eggs.

Not pastured/grassfed/organic, but at least I do myself a lot of favor by not eating junks like McDonalds and grains/gluten and other processed craps. No need to worry about it if it's not in your budget. Just do what you feel comfortable.

0
3219f5b0673071f183dc66e0338b1daa

(86)

on June 04, 2011
at 12:51 AM

Kosher chicken is a joke, from Paleo perspective. Pastured chicken is far healthier. I hear you, though, about the cost. If you buy from a store like Whole Foods, prepare to pay through the nose. Many people on this list should be able to help you source more affordable options. As for non-pastured chicken, I'll eat it, but only sparingly.

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on June 05, 2011
at 04:00 PM

It's not a joke if you're strictly religious.

0
095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on June 03, 2011
at 11:54 PM

Honestly, other than higher fat content of animals which are grain fed while kept in a small "keeping" area like with feed lots, modern chicken farms, there really isn't much difference in quality. Animals eat grains and turn the grains into meat...we eat the meat. No matter what they eat...it's still meat.

If you need Kosher, sorry, that's something I know very little about. I didn't even know there was such a thing as Kosher chicken. Isn't Kosher about the cleanliness and manner of slaughter, not the way it's fed?

I eat more like Primal than Paleo...so I don't worry about things like fat content. Since I gave up the low fat, high carb, grain fed lifestyle...I'm the leanest I've ever been, the healthiest I've ever been, and my lab work shows it...so does the lack of new MS symptoms.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 04, 2011
at 01:37 AM

I'd pretty much agree, for the muscle meat of said animal. If you want to eat the whole animal and/or the fat then I'd say get pastured for sure. That's why I answered above to eat the breasts skinless if it's a factory bird.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on June 04, 2011
at 12:52 AM

there's a HUGE difference.

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on June 05, 2011
at 06:12 PM

Kosher is about the cleanliness and slaughter, not feeding. Kosher and Halal meat has traditionally been held to a higher standard in that regard than regular meat, but it pales in comparison to pastured. Before I knew anything about pastured meats I sometimes got Kosher chicken because there was possibly less risk of contamination from salmonella, E.coli and things like that.

-1
A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on December 18, 2013
at 06:56 AM

Non-pastured chicken has a higher PUFA content and has more breast and less developed legs, and they might be pumped full of hormones and antibiotics and be crammed into tiny cages where they can't even spread their wings. I'm in the same boat, pastured chicken does cost a fortune (though I just found out that one of my favorite Asian markets carries affordable pastured chicken YAAY) But for most of the time, my family and I feel better about eating Foster Farms chicken, which while may technically be conventional and not pastured, is certified humane, and it's the next best thing, even if not by much.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!