3

votes

Store bought broth versus homemade bone broth?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 25, 2012 at 3:18 PM

What's the difference between store bought free-range chicken (or beef) broth and the "bone broth" that everyone talks about and is supposed to be so healing?

5ae48230df3b05bb8f210405f75fc8ed

(153)

on August 29, 2012
at 09:38 PM

For those not really paying attention, I'm guessing that the original question included a phrase like "I know this is a stupid question, but ..." and that this is a joke playing off such a phrase. The question was edited AFTER this answer was posted--thus the answer now seems random, but was probably funny to begin with.

Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

(4400)

on July 26, 2012
at 07:05 AM

Upvoted again because it was a good joke.

8f87879387f2a357db7c33008ff9a04a

(887)

on July 25, 2012
at 11:17 PM

Yes, it all depends on the life of the animal. How nutrient dense the stock is depends on how the animal was fed. I pay 20 $ for a pastured chicken...damn straight I'm extending my $ by making amazing stock!

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on July 25, 2012
at 09:58 PM

likely somebody didn't know what "jk" means!

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on July 25, 2012
at 09:38 PM

upvoted from -1 because it was a joke. let's lighten up!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on July 25, 2012
at 05:25 PM

There are no stupid questions. Just stupid answers. Browse some of mine for examples.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 25, 2012
at 05:12 PM

Agreed, but you aren't giving 24 hours of your time to making it. I am assuming shopping, preparing, stirring, etc.

3351f6c8ec1ea64435e419f380ca6468

(1255)

on July 25, 2012
at 04:59 PM

An hour? When I make bone broth/stock, it's in the crock pot for 24+ hours.

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7 Answers

best answer

8
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on July 25, 2012
at 03:39 PM

I'm not sure here, but I would imagine store-bought broth is just that -- broth. When we say "bone broth," we're actually talking about a stock, which is typically made from simmering the bones for a long time at a low temp to extract all the minerals and gelatin.

Broth is usually just made from the meat and wouldn't have the same nutrient content as a traditionally made stock from bones.

I think canned/boxed broth is good in a pinch if you don't have the real thing in the freezer, especially if you just need it for color/flavor. But for health/nutrition, I don't think the canned or boxed stuff has anywhere near the healing properties of the real deal.

The reason they call chicken soup "Jewish penicillin" is, I think, because when it's made the traditional way, it'll have all the gut-helpful gelatin and easily absorbed/bioavailable minerals. Not so much with the stuff in a can, no matter how "fancy" it is (organic, free-range, no MSG, etc.) I don't think too many mass-marketing companies are taking the time to do it old-school.

4
78964c5cc470f86a5897db8e1ce8e6f9

on July 25, 2012
at 03:40 PM

Broth is made by boiling meat & veggies with no bones. Bone broth is more properly known as stock and is made by boiling bones along with the meat & veggies.

1
457027ce8ff067aed8e771a0da404222

on July 25, 2012
at 10:20 PM

A good bone broth will slightly gel (the amount of gelling will depend upon how much water is in it) in the fridge. A store bought broth was made without much or any cartilage, and will NOT gel in the fridge but will be absolutely liquid.

Which is fine, perhaps, but the bone broth, homemade, is going to be better and more nutritious.

1
Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

on July 25, 2012
at 07:54 PM

I think it's a question of getting the most nutrients out of your broth/stock.

When it's made at home, you are (more) sure of where the bones came from, that your broth contains marrow and other nutrient-dense minerals.

The storebought stuff is a big question mark since you can't be sure how the stuff was made.

8f87879387f2a357db7c33008ff9a04a

(887)

on July 25, 2012
at 11:17 PM

Yes, it all depends on the life of the animal. How nutrient dense the stock is depends on how the animal was fed. I pay 20 $ for a pastured chicken...damn straight I'm extending my $ by making amazing stock!

0
A3a4696c919e916ec971691559e9c942

(2043)

on July 25, 2012
at 08:03 PM

One big difference...the taste! Once you make your own you will wonder how you lived without it. A crockpot and some beef bones changes everything!

0
D45e43b08cd99a04f5d4294a871e1078

(1010)

on July 25, 2012
at 06:50 PM

This question is so stupid, I'm not going to even dignify it with a response. jk.

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on July 25, 2012
at 09:38 PM

upvoted from -1 because it was a joke. let's lighten up!

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on July 25, 2012
at 09:58 PM

likely somebody didn't know what "jk" means!

Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

(4400)

on July 26, 2012
at 07:05 AM

Upvoted again because it was a good joke.

5ae48230df3b05bb8f210405f75fc8ed

(153)

on August 29, 2012
at 09:38 PM

For those not really paying attention, I'm guessing that the original question included a phrase like "I know this is a stupid question, but ..." and that this is a joke playing off such a phrase. The question was edited AFTER this answer was posted--thus the answer now seems random, but was probably funny to begin with.

0
C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 25, 2012
at 03:24 PM

About an hour's time, and probably a few bucks.

Seriously, the store bought probably has not been prepared with as much marrow.

3351f6c8ec1ea64435e419f380ca6468

(1255)

on July 25, 2012
at 04:59 PM

An hour? When I make bone broth/stock, it's in the crock pot for 24+ hours.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 25, 2012
at 05:12 PM

Agreed, but you aren't giving 24 hours of your time to making it. I am assuming shopping, preparing, stirring, etc.

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