4

votes

Oh great, another bone broth question?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 01, 2012 at 5:48 PM

Hack mine please.

Two large-ish beef straight leg bones, no joints, roasted at 400F for 30 minutes with some tallow. Both ends of both bones exposed marrow. Very little meat on one of the bones.

Into the slow cooker with ~4 quarts of filtered water, 1 T. vinegar, 1 t. salt and 1 peeled garlic clove. Put the cooker on High and it took nearly 4 hours to get up to a boil- then turned it to low where it slowly simmered for ~6.5 hours. By that time it was time for bed, so I turned it off but left it overnight at room temp.

The next morning, turned it on High again- took 2.5 hours to boil (warm vs. cold water), turned it to Low. Added some finely minced onion and carrot, a bay leaf, and the leafy celery tops. Simmered for 4 hours. Added a couple cups finely chopped roast beef and a celery stalk, simmered another hour, and then turned it off and took the lid off to help it cool. Fished out bay leaf and celery tops. Once coolish, put into glass mason jars. Got 2.5 quarts "soup".

The bones were hollow- most of the marrow (but not all of it) had dissolved, and the remaining marrow was a big glop floating on top. Bones were not soft. I reserved the bones and marrow glop in case I can use it again.

Stuck it in the fridge overnight. Next morning had a great thick layer of fat on top of each jar which I chipped off, but definitely not gelatinous whatsoever. Tastes okay, and I will mess with the flavoring- but not gelatinous, which is what I'm going for.

Total simmer time- 10 hours, plus the 7 hours of heating, and the overnight (approx 9 hours) cooling. What else can I do-- hotter temp? Faster to bring to boil? Longer simmering? More vinegar, less water, more bones?!

Edit: Can I use the hollow bones and "marrow glop" for another batch? Might not gel up but I should get more out of the bones yet with some vinegar, right?

Medium avatar

(12379)

on April 12, 2012
at 05:41 PM

Hey Jenny J! Are you on facebook? Send me an email to themilnes at shaw dot ca if you are interested in chatting with some awesome paleo peeps online. Let me know when you see this so I can delete my email deets!

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 02, 2012
at 07:23 PM

Yeah, they are just in the poultry department. I have always seen them in the grocery stores growing up/nowadays. Check your grocery store, ask the guy at the meat counter if he has any in the back if you don't see any. I think it's pretty common, but I have only lived in areas where there is large Asian populations (right beside Chinatown, they always use chicken feet in broth) or Jewish populations (the key to a Jewish penicillin soup broth is in the feet!).

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 02, 2012
at 03:22 AM

Excellent suggestion. Except when I'm done with my knuckles I like to scoop that stuff off, salt it and eat it in big chunks. :)

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:27 AM

and you find these at a regular supermarket??

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:20 AM

(I know my food safety, so sorry if I'm a bit touchy about the suggestion that it's not safe to leave it in the crockpot overnight. I just don't think you read the post thoroughly enough to warrant your comment.)

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:19 AM

These were labeled soup bones. They did have marrow all the way through. I only called them "marrow bones" because I've seen two types described in all the previous broth posts- joint bones and marrow bones.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:17 AM

I did this Sunday and it's still just liquid. Thanks though.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:16 AM

It's sitting in the crockpot overnight, just off. Given the enamel of the liner, it really didn't cool off all that much- was still 120F the next morning. And if I'm boiling it again for 6 hours the next day, how is that a big deal? Everyone says how you can boil it after 4 days in the fridge and it's okay, so why wouldn't it be the same after one night at 120F?

363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on February 02, 2012
at 12:15 AM

Agreed - Knuckle bones definitely improved my beef broth!

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on February 01, 2012
at 11:23 PM

I was going to suggest breaking up the bones a bit. The chef at a restaurant at which I once worked spent a good bit of time smashing the bones for his stocks. More surface area = more release of collagen.

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on February 01, 2012
at 07:04 PM

It's not the best idea to let it cool overnight outside the fridge, not from the gelatin perspective, but from the food safety perspective. It spends a lot of time in a sketchy temperature for bacteria. Either cool it completely in the fridge, or throw it in a crock pot overnight (I usually do the latter).

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:39 PM

@Chris, I think we should assume the past problem is because you didn't add any joint parts to your mix of bones. BUT I just want to add that that "gray glop of marrow" would actually taste fabulous when you stirred it into the broth. Like putting butter on a veg

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:10 PM

Thanks, definitely need to add some "joint" bones next time!

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:09 PM

Thanks, sounds like I need less water and definitely some joint bones! I'll try a mix of marrow bones and joints next time.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:08 PM

Yep, I said I left it in the fridge overnight. It's been in there since Sunday night and it's still not gelatinous. I wasn't going to leave a big gray glop of marrow on the top, but I could've simmered longer to dissolve further. Like I said, most of it had dissolved.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:08 PM

Yep, I said I left it in the fridge overnight. It's been in there since Sunday night and it's still not gelatinous. I wasn't going to leave a big gray glop of marrow on the top, but I could've simmered longer to dissolve further.

  • 2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

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11 Answers

best answer

7
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on February 01, 2012
at 06:03 PM

Marrow bones don't have a lot of gelatin in them. This is why the WAPF recommend including bones with connective tissue (e.g., neck or knuckle bones) in their beef stock recipe.

363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on February 02, 2012
at 12:15 AM

Agreed - Knuckle bones definitely improved my beef broth!

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:10 PM

Thanks, definitely need to add some "joint" bones next time!

3
20eefe24d8ccf096096f05b5bce1ea40

(988)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:38 PM

Go get some beef feet, the whole thing or slices, and throw it in your pot. 1 foot, 1 chunk marrow bone, simmering for 1.5 days, not turned off over night. Marrow bone for all the minerals in the bone, and the great marrow taste, and the foot provides all the collagen you could ever want, it will be solid, thick jello if you add a foot, I promise. Tastes better too. I don't add spices until about an hour before I turn it off, then I let it cool until I can handle it. Seems to work best that way, I can fish out the chunks of basil and parsley before they fall apart like they will if they've been in there for a day. But that's just how I do it. Add more feet. Chicken or turkey feet if you can't find beef feet, they don't need to be in nearly as long as beef feet, 8 hours or so will do them pretty well.

3
0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

on February 01, 2012
at 06:04 PM

I get very little gel action from the straight bones, so started buying knuckle bones from US Wellness. I toss one in with my roasted marrow bones, some lemon juice or ACV, keep the water level as low as you can while still covering the bones -- this part is hard because of course we want MOAR BROTH but even a little too much water will dilute the gelatin, in my experience. I only toss in a few bay leaves, saving the bone broth from too much more moisture added by the vegetables. Also, for what it's worth, I apparently cook mine longer than everyone else -- usually upwards of three days on very low. Once I get a broth with a nice firm set, then I'll start part two with veggies and whatnot if I want a stock or a soup.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:09 PM

Thanks, sounds like I need less water and definitely some joint bones! I'll try a mix of marrow bones and joints next time.

2
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on February 01, 2012
at 07:05 PM

Marrow is mostly fat, theres like perhaps 10-15% protein. Altho it is the superfat. Best fat on animal par brains or something similar. Straight leg marrow bones are not so good for stock. Whole beef knuckle is what you want. It will have tendons etc. Best for stock. Ask from your butcher. Neck bones are great as well but they might be unavailble due to the bse scare.

1
D5dff6376e17373751ccf4a10aaa0b34

(274)

on February 02, 2012
at 12:06 AM

Sometimes it takes longer than just overnight in the fridge for my broth to gel up, like halfway though the next day. I use marrow bones with the ends of the bone still attached.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:17 AM

I did this Sunday and it's still just liquid. Thanks though.

1
Cc7381bd787721575ea9198048132adb

on February 01, 2012
at 07:15 PM

Crack a beef knuckle open with a chisel and hammer. Boil. Gelatin.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on February 02, 2012
at 03:22 AM

Excellent suggestion. Except when I'm done with my knuckles I like to scoop that stuff off, salt it and eat it in big chunks. :)

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on February 01, 2012
at 11:23 PM

I was going to suggest breaking up the bones a bit. The chef at a restaurant at which I once worked spent a good bit of time smashing the bones for his stocks. More surface area = more release of collagen.

0
93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on February 02, 2012
at 01:26 AM

I bought something labeled "marrow bones" only once. The target market is dog owners. Waste of money. Get soup bones, or at least bones that show well-delineated marrow lines on the ends, and look like they contain marrow all the way through (hard to describe the look, but you catch on quickly).

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:19 AM

These were labeled soup bones. They did have marrow all the way through. I only called them "marrow bones" because I've seen two types described in all the previous broth posts- joint bones and marrow bones.

0
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 02, 2012
at 12:59 AM

No matter what kind of broth I'm making, I always, always, always throw at least 1 chicken foot in. It's how my mom always made her beef, chicken, and turkey stock, and those guys are little gelatinous gold mines. Just buy a really big pack of them from the grocery store, and throw them all in the freezer. Every time you are going to make some broth, grab a handful and add them in.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 02, 2012
at 02:27 AM

and you find these at a regular supermarket??

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 02, 2012
at 07:23 PM

Yeah, they are just in the poultry department. I have always seen them in the grocery stores growing up/nowadays. Check your grocery store, ask the guy at the meat counter if he has any in the back if you don't see any. I think it's pretty common, but I have only lived in areas where there is large Asian populations (right beside Chinatown, they always use chicken feet in broth) or Jewish populations (the key to a Jewish penicillin soup broth is in the feet!).

Medium avatar

(12379)

on April 12, 2012
at 05:41 PM

Hey Jenny J! Are you on facebook? Send me an email to themilnes at shaw dot ca if you are interested in chatting with some awesome paleo peeps online. Let me know when you see this so I can delete my email deets!

0
A6b2325aefabe3e40c89646e40223f6f

on February 01, 2012
at 06:59 PM

More vinegar should help... I would (and do) use 2 TBSP with that much water. It's not enough to make the broth taste "vinegary."

0
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:04 PM

Stupid question, I know, but I'll start with you can't judge the consistency until the broth's been in the fridge for a long time such as overnight. Mine certainly isn't firm when I first put it in the fridge but it's like firm jello the next day.

I'm further guessing that the removal of marrow and/or tallow is a partial cause of watery broth because if meat is all that's in it you don't get real broth. I also agree you need a mix of marrow and joint bones for best consistency. I just made a batch that is like firm jello, so here's what I did for comparison.

I started with raw bones at about 10 in the morning. Like you, I had them on High for about 2 hours--I didn't roast them first. I then switched to Low and left them simmering on that setting until about 10 the next morning. The bones came out "clean" and I removed ONLY the clean bones. I put the clean bones in a bowl and even rinsed them with a little fresh water and then poured that "broth" back into the slow-cooker, discarding only the clean bones.

I added vegetables and cooked the broth and the veggies for another 4-5 hours when we dug into the pot.

I think the suggestion I'd make is don't remove the marrow from the broth for possible re-use; it's a key component of firmness as it continues to dissolve into the broth. Yes, a layer coats the upper surface but I believe other portions of the marrow and cartilage remain in solution and create the firm broth.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:08 PM

Yep, I said I left it in the fridge overnight. It's been in there since Sunday night and it's still not gelatinous. I wasn't going to leave a big gray glop of marrow on the top, but I could've simmered longer to dissolve further. Like I said, most of it had dissolved.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:39 PM

@Chris, I think we should assume the past problem is because you didn't add any joint parts to your mix of bones. BUT I just want to add that that "gray glop of marrow" would actually taste fabulous when you stirred it into the broth. Like putting butter on a veg

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 01, 2012
at 06:08 PM

Yep, I said I left it in the fridge overnight. It's been in there since Sunday night and it's still not gelatinous. I wasn't going to leave a big gray glop of marrow on the top, but I could've simmered longer to dissolve further.

0
7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on February 01, 2012
at 05:59 PM

I've never gotton my marrow beef broth to go gelatinous--only my chicken and turkey broth does. Maybe I'm going something wrong too. I cook for 48 hours at low in a 7 quart slow cooker. Also...I save all the fat to cook with but it's hard as a rock so you have to soften each time.

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