7

votes

Is it useful to use the bones from spareribs to make broth?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 07, 2011 at 12:07 PM

Simple question. Nothing to add except this picture maybe?

alt text

Thanks

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 08, 2011
at 05:28 AM

Bones are always valuable, i save even roasted marrow bones and freeze them for cooking stock. The collagen doesnt dissolve during roasting. Just the fat and marrow that has been eaten are gone. I first cook them to death in pressure cooker and, and remove them and add completely fresh bones for second cooking. I just hate to throw away good organic bones, very hard to source around here.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on September 08, 2011
at 02:04 AM

I like scallions snipped on my creme fraiche!

Medium avatar

(5639)

on September 08, 2011
at 02:03 AM

I'm not sure you want to be giving your dogs cooked bones though...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 08, 2011
at 01:58 AM

I just posted an answer down below, but just let me add that our dogs each get to enjoy a nice rib bone before the rest go into the broth. We also spoon some of the resulting bone broth on the doggies meals in the morning and evening. They are most appreciative and I'm sure they will benefit from it too.

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on September 07, 2011
at 07:56 PM

Thanks for making me want ribs.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 07, 2011
at 07:28 PM

Thanks for the tip re smoking

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 07, 2011
at 07:27 PM

Thanks Jan. I'll just have to try. Not that bone broth is very difficult to make...

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 07, 2011
at 07:26 PM

Uncle, your first paragraph is exactly the reason why I asked the question (food value after cooking, and taste). Thanks

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 07, 2011
at 07:25 PM

Thanks for the tips!

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 07, 2011
at 01:35 PM

Kathi, sorry to disappoint you, but they are just picked from google image... Just to make my short question a little more attractive

2f931662684a7747be36255c8b486228

(1049)

on September 07, 2011
at 01:15 PM

Your ribs look super. How do you make them. We are always looking for new ways to improve our ribs. I'm up voting your question. I never thought of using the bones other than giving them to our dogs. Good idea.

  • 89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

    asked by

    (10299)
  • Views
    13.4K
  • Last Activity
    1430D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

7 Answers

4
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on September 07, 2011
at 01:01 PM

Funny, I was craving short ribs, cooler weather is coming!, and found this recipe on Mark's Daily Apple, at the bottom is a recipe for a spare rib vegetable soup which multi-tasks the bones and other tasty bits. The only thing I would do differently would be to skim the broth really well, get the foam off. If you want it thicker, I really like thick soups, puree 1/2 the veg and use that for a heavier texture. Or get some gelatin sheets if you're looking to add more gelatin in your diet, the spare rib bones definitely won't have the level, as Jan mentioned, as bigger bones do.

If you're eating dairy, a spoonful of sour cream on top with some snipped fresh dill and this soup would be damn stellar.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 07, 2011
at 07:25 PM

Thanks for the tips!

Medium avatar

(5639)

on September 08, 2011
at 02:04 AM

I like scallions snipped on my creme fraiche!

3
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on September 07, 2011
at 04:00 PM

My opinion is that after baking for several hours, the bones would have a lot less food value than bones that are raw or cooked less. Also, pork stock is among my least favorite bone broths due to flavor and smell, I prefer poultry and beef broths.

I don't bother doing anything with the bones from pork ribs, and use chicken and beef bones instead.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 07, 2011
at 07:26 PM

Uncle, your first paragraph is exactly the reason why I asked the question (food value after cooking, and taste). Thanks

3
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 07, 2011
at 12:52 PM

Sure, they have red marrow, water soluable proteins. But very little collagen. Makes a watery broth. Get a whole large beef knuckle with tendons, makes a gelatinous stock.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 07, 2011
at 07:27 PM

Thanks Jan. I'll just have to try. Not that bone broth is very difficult to make...

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on September 08, 2011
at 05:28 AM

Bones are always valuable, i save even roasted marrow bones and freeze them for cooking stock. The collagen doesnt dissolve during roasting. Just the fat and marrow that has been eaten are gone. I first cook them to death in pressure cooker and, and remove them and add completely fresh bones for second cooking. I just hate to throw away good organic bones, very hard to source around here.

1
D5cde8031564f905260ce9aa7a1f5e2c

on September 08, 2011
at 10:16 PM

I regularly make beef rib bone-exclusive broth and it turns out gelatinous every time. Totally worth it.

Just cook for at least 24 hours, or until the bones are chewable and edible.

1
C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

on September 08, 2011
at 10:12 PM

Smoked pork bone broth is perfectly fine to make but it may not be suitable for soup. What you want to do is match the broth to a dish that will benefit from its smoky, porky flavor. A braise or a pot roast would benefit greatly. Sausage casseroles. Spicy sautes that need a deglaze or a pan sauce. Whatever tips your imagination.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 08, 2011
at 01:54 AM

Spare ribs can be either pork or beef. I use the large beef ribs and smoke them on the gas grill for about 6 hours with some water soaked mesquite chips in a smoker box. The rib bones then go into a large ziplock in the fridge (or freezer) until all are eaten and the bones ready for broth. I have a large bolt cutter that I use to break them in half and put as many as I can into an 8-quart pressure cooker and cook for 3 hours and let it cool down naturally without releasing the pressure. I then add some veggies and reheat and cook for another hour and then let it cool down naturally again. Strain it into a container and after it cools it goes into the fridge and the next day the broth is near solid. I just scoop out some into a mug and add a little salt and heat it and usually have it with a meal.

1
A6b2325aefabe3e40c89646e40223f6f

on September 07, 2011
at 04:34 PM

I tried making bone broth from the bones of smoked spareribs. I love that smokiness on the ribs, but it didn't work for me in the broth... just seemed out of place. If you don't smoke your ribs then maybe that wouldn't be an issue (in that case, the fact that you are not smoking your ribs is itself an issue, but that's a topic for another board ;-).

Also, as mentioned by someone else, it was not as gelatinous as when I make beef bone broth.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 07, 2011
at 07:28 PM

Thanks for the tip re smoking

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!