2

votes

I'm a FAILURE at making bone broth :-(

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 02, 2012 at 1:50 AM

I've made bone broth 4 times.

Take a guess which of the following really gelled and wiggled like jello?

Here's what I used for the 4 attempts:

  1. family pack of chicken drumsticks with 2 beef bones (with marrow)
  2. family pack of chicken thighs with 2 beef bones (with marrow)
  3. whole chicken (cut up) with 2 beef bones (with marrow)
  4. Six turkey drumsticks. (I can't remember if I used the beef bones or not)

For each trial above, I used 2T of apple cider vinegar, and I cooked the protein for 8 hours, separated the meat from the bones & skin, then tossed the bones & skin back in for an additional 12 hours with an additional 2T apple cider vinegar (20 hours total).

The only one that gelled was attempt #4 (the six turkey drumsticks).

I would gladly do that each time, but the my grocery store doesn't seem to stock the turkey drumsticks regularly.

The gelling and consistency of the turkey drumstick broth was 10x times as gelled. In fact, until my 4th trial, I didn't realize how gelled it could be.

So, what the heck am I doing wrong with my chicken bone broth?

All suggestions would be very much appreciated.

Thanks, Mike

PS: I would say the total qty of water used on all attempts was essentially the same: (10 cups, about 2.5 liters).

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on May 30, 2014
at 10:24 PM

Agree 1000% with the pressure cooker. I have an electric one. Load in the ingredients, put the lid on, press a button and walk away. Perfectly clear, jelled and delicious bone broth in ONE HOUR. Idiot proof, too. I toss wings and thighs in with some carrots, celery, and onion, cover with water. That's it. Perhaps not technically "bone broth" because the bones still have meat, but works for me.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on February 22, 2013
at 05:34 AM

Second the pressure cooker! My broths never fail to gel since getting one.

4cbc4488855b0421943b57de0a9018c2

(212)

on February 22, 2013
at 02:26 AM

That's interesting. Most people cook it for much longer, but do not bring it to a boil. My guess is that you still have gelatin because while you do boil the broth, you don't cook it for too long that it breaks down the collagen necessary for gelatin to form.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 20, 2012
at 09:50 AM

People want gelatin, because gelatin is one of the main nutittional bonuses of bones. The three things -gelatin, glutamine and glucosamine from bones helps heal the gut mucosa (and also ligaments etc)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 20, 2012
at 09:48 AM

^ The store brought stock isnt real stock. (even "real stock")

80890193d74240cab6dda920665bfb6c

(1528)

on May 20, 2012
at 08:39 PM

The kind of pressure cooker matter here; http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/11/22/pressure-cooked-stocks-we-got-schooled/ But basically be sure to use 3 lbs. bones, and add 3/4 lb. oxtail/chicken drumsticks/fish cheeks/lamb shanks depending to 8 cups water. Don't forget to salt when finished. So many complain about the taste after cooking because they haven't added enough salt.

91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

(2081)

on May 11, 2012
at 01:13 PM

What he said...

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 10, 2012
at 05:57 PM

Excellent, thank you!

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:57 PM

Yes...get the weird parts for cheap!

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:25 PM

And Glither's point is that you don't HAVE to have overcooked meat for bone broth- it doesn't add anything to the broth to over-boil the meat. Boiled meat is generally cooked faster than roasted meat ("falling off the bone"), and overdone boiled chicken or beef is just bad tasting. Boiling the whole chicken for a few hours, then removing the meat and boiling the carcass for 12-16 hours will possibly improve your results, plus leave you with better-tasting chicken to eat.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:22 PM

The thin bones don't have anything to do with gelatin. The gelatin that makes your broth "wiggle like Jello" is in the collagen parts attached to the bones- collagen is in chicken feet, knuckle bones, some ligaments/tendons, etc. The turkey drumsticks must have had more collagen-containing tissue than any of your chicken parts. For what it's worth, I add a pork hock to my beef and chicken stocks, and it really helps.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 11:17 PM

Interesting. From everything I've read, 20 hours should be good. Per the comments above, maybe not enough water is evaporating? However , the fact that it gelled with the turkey makes me think it might be ingredients. I will certainly post any new results from my ongoing experiments.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 06:38 PM

BTW, any problems with me tossing in the chicken fat/skin for the remaining 12 hours? Could the fat mess it up? (I do skim it off when done after chilling in the fridge).

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 05:37 PM

@glither: I guess I'm still confused: I thought cooking longer was generally better: like 'meat falling off the bone'. I'm not sure why starting with a whole chicken raw for 8 hours, the 12 more with just the bones would be a problem, unless the meet is preventing the breakdown of the bones, and 12 hours isn't enought. However, I ended up with SUPER GEL when I used the turkey drumsticks. At the time, my hypotheses was there were more thinner bones throughout the drumstick and maybe dissolved better.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 05:31 PM

@ancestral_stars: I just read that: "Roasting the bones ensures a good flavor in the resulting beef stock. Failure to do so may lend a sour or off-taste to the end product."

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 05:27 PM

Great links @Glither! I'm reading through the comments on that page now. Here's one that's interesting: "I suspect that chicken stock in a crock pot does not appear to gel as much as chicken stock on a stovetop simply because crock pots are designed to not lose any moisture, whereas even many good stovetop pots will lose some moisture when covered."

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 05:14 PM

@ancestral_stars: do you think there's any difference roasting a chicken first (I guess you mean in an oven) v. slow cooking it in liquid? (My reasoning was less cleanup if I cook the chicken in the same slow cooker as my bone broth process)

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 05:13 PM

Thanks Roth re: maybe too much acid. That makes sense. I'll use just the 2T (not 4T).

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on May 02, 2012
at 12:35 PM

I think the marrow wouldn't be relevant to gelling. It's the knuckle bones that make for good gelling action.

16e617676c5ac710e5235e0b773edc0b

(2640)

on May 02, 2012
at 10:33 AM

Ironically the only broth I made which hasn't gelled was the one containing chicken feet and necks. I'm going to try roasting them first before throwing them in the pot.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on May 02, 2012
at 08:12 AM

If you overcook bone broth, you'll denature the gelatin and it won't "gel up." If you make the bone broth too acidic, it will denature the gelatin and it won't gel up. There's no rule that says bone broth has to gel up.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on May 02, 2012
at 05:07 AM

When I make bone broth I ALWAYS roast the meat/bone first. I then remove the meat for the most part and put the bone/juices in the crock pot. For some reason roasting seems to release something. I also cook it for 12-16 hours on low in the crock pot. *shrugs*

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 02, 2012
at 03:29 AM

Don't worry, you will learn with time! I can't make a good one either!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 03:15 AM

I went into an Asian grocery store last night for the first time in my life. They had some scary animal parts. Cows foot, pig heart, etc. Had you asked me 3 months ago if I could ever see myself putting a pig foot in my slow cooker, I would have laughed.

76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on May 02, 2012
at 02:56 AM

Try chicken feet, beef knuckle, beef tendon, or oxtail.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 02:42 AM

I just edited my post because I forgot I usually throw in 2 beef bones (with marrow). I can't recall if I also used the beef bones when I used the turkey drumsticks. I wonder if that could be relevant?

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 02:39 AM

Just to be clear, I remove the meat after 8 hours and eat it, tossing the bones a d fat back in for 12 more hours

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22 Answers

best answer

6
Medium avatar

(3024)

on May 02, 2012
at 05:55 AM

You are confusing making regular soup and cooking bone broth. For bone broth you start with bones (didn't see that one coming, did you?).

There is no reason to cook meat for eight hours. If you want to start with pieces of meat, cook the meat until it is done, separate meat from bones, then start with your bone broth.

No reason to put apple cider vinegar in with the whole pieces of meat. ACV is used to leach minerals out of bones, but your bones were covered in meat.

Beef bones need to be roasted before they are added to the pot.

Why I got started, I found these links helpful.

http://nourishedkitchen.com/roast-chicken-stock/

http://nourishedkitchen.com/beef-stock-recipe/

Good luck!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 05:37 PM

@glither: I guess I'm still confused: I thought cooking longer was generally better: like 'meat falling off the bone'. I'm not sure why starting with a whole chicken raw for 8 hours, the 12 more with just the bones would be a problem, unless the meet is preventing the breakdown of the bones, and 12 hours isn't enought. However, I ended up with SUPER GEL when I used the turkey drumsticks. At the time, my hypotheses was there were more thinner bones throughout the drumstick and maybe dissolved better.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 05:27 PM

Great links @Glither! I'm reading through the comments on that page now. Here's one that's interesting: "I suspect that chicken stock in a crock pot does not appear to gel as much as chicken stock on a stovetop simply because crock pots are designed to not lose any moisture, whereas even many good stovetop pots will lose some moisture when covered."

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:22 PM

The thin bones don't have anything to do with gelatin. The gelatin that makes your broth "wiggle like Jello" is in the collagen parts attached to the bones- collagen is in chicken feet, knuckle bones, some ligaments/tendons, etc. The turkey drumsticks must have had more collagen-containing tissue than any of your chicken parts. For what it's worth, I add a pork hock to my beef and chicken stocks, and it really helps.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:25 PM

And Glither's point is that you don't HAVE to have overcooked meat for bone broth- it doesn't add anything to the broth to over-boil the meat. Boiled meat is generally cooked faster than roasted meat ("falling off the bone"), and overdone boiled chicken or beef is just bad tasting. Boiling the whole chicken for a few hours, then removing the meat and boiling the carcass for 12-16 hours will possibly improve your results, plus leave you with better-tasting chicken to eat.

4
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on May 02, 2012
at 02:52 AM

I would not consider it a failure if it doesn't gell. In order to gell you have to have enough, well, gelatin, which is primarily in the joints. There is a lot of nutrition in the bones, ligaments, marrow, etc. even if that doesn't set up as nice. That is in some ways more versatile because you can just drink it, make pan sauces from it, etc. I use bone broth to braise cabbage.

Starting from raw pieces will provide a broth that is lighter in flavor, more clear, and more versatile than roasted pieces, which provide broth which is darker and more flavorful. I prefer both for different reasons, and sometimes mix them. I keep a gallon sized freezer bag in the freezer and when I make roast poultry of any kind (chicken, duck, game hen, quail), during prep I put the unused giblets and scraps in the bag, and after dinner i coarsely chop up the remains and add them to the bag, then after 2-3 meals I have enough for a big pot of stock.

You can't really go too far wrong unless it is so thin that it tastes like water... Don't worry.

91c2e2a35e578e2e79ce7d631b753879

(2081)

on May 11, 2012
at 01:13 PM

What he said...

3
2b3edde3c7b9393fe36a2dd9c8acf473

on May 10, 2012
at 08:26 PM

I've made stock numerous times by simmering it on a stove for long periods of time (even 48+), and it always fails to live up to the results you can get with a pressure cooker. Collagen doesn't break down into gelatin until you hit about 175 F, and it's tough to keep a stock pot at >175 F without it boiling too vigorously over a long period of time, and even then you're limited to 212 F. A pressure cooker can go up to 250 F at 15psi at sea level, and the rate at which collagen breaks down accelerates exponentially with respect to the temperature increase. I've used pounds worth of chicken feet in conventionally made stock, and it still wouldn't gel, while I've used just a whole leg quarters in a pressure cooker and had it gel wonderfully. Here are some resources:

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/From-the-Test-Kitchen-Perfect-Pressure-Cooker-Chicken-Stock

http://www.thepauperedchef.com/2010/06/under-pressure-how-to-make-superb-chicken-stock-in-about-an-hour.html

http://www.dadcooksdinner.com/2011/01/pressure-cooker-beef-stock.html

80890193d74240cab6dda920665bfb6c

(1528)

on May 20, 2012
at 08:39 PM

The kind of pressure cooker matter here; http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/11/22/pressure-cooked-stocks-we-got-schooled/ But basically be sure to use 3 lbs. bones, and add 3/4 lb. oxtail/chicken drumsticks/fish cheeks/lamb shanks depending to 8 cups water. Don't forget to salt when finished. So many complain about the taste after cooking because they haven't added enough salt.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on February 22, 2013
at 05:34 AM

Second the pressure cooker! My broths never fail to gel since getting one.

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on May 30, 2014
at 10:24 PM

Agree 1000% with the pressure cooker. I have an electric one. Load in the ingredients, put the lid on, press a button and walk away. Perfectly clear, jelled and delicious bone broth in ONE HOUR. Idiot proof, too. I toss wings and thighs in with some carrots, celery, and onion, cover with water. That's it. Perhaps not technically "bone broth" because the bones still have meat, but works for me.

2
1e8b0544791fa695c718834e7a040642

(388)

on May 02, 2012
at 02:32 AM

I would try using the more joint-y (probably not a word) part of the animals. Chicken backs work well, and are often sold for practically nothing. And beef knuckle bones. I've had good luck with the bones of a roasted or rotisserie chicken after we've eaten all of the meat off of it.

I also do weird things like throw in egg shells, which I hear adds calcium, and some seaweed.

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on May 09, 2012
at 02:57 PM

Yes...get the weird parts for cheap!

1
7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

on February 27, 2013
at 04:14 AM

I'm a big fan of broth in the PRESSURE COOKER. I've abandoned my slow-cooker.

Here's a 6 second video of my pressure cooker broth after just 30 minutes. I take a whole chicken cut up (3 or 4 pounds), cook for 5.5 minutes per pound (after attaining pressure, which takes 10 about 10 minutes):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeefU9f28Cs&feature=youtube_gdata_player

This one I think I added some extra stuff (like some chicken feet and a beef bone marrow bone), and cooked longer (maybe 75 minutes total):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjDlupxClaU&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Enjoy!

Mike

1
4cbc4488855b0421943b57de0a9018c2

(212)

on February 22, 2013
at 02:16 AM

Beef feet will provide ample amounts of gelatin. Just drop a few into your selection of bones.

i'm-a-failure-at-making-bone-broth-:-(

I believe the reason why it's white, as opposed to red, is that it's mainly composed of connective tissue and cartilage. Beef muscle contains much more blood vessels, and hence the color of red meat. The connective tissues contain collagen, the necessary ingredient to create gelatin.

This lady got 12 days worth of gelatin from the same batch of bones! http://www.traditional-foods.com/bone-broth/

Something to remember is to not boil the broth, but simmer it - just under about 180 degrees should be good. Lastly, from what I've seen in recipes, you don't want to use much more water than 2 cups per lb of bones. The dilution could prevent the gelatin from forming.

1
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 20, 2012
at 08:23 AM

So weird. I get gelatin from chicken carcass (cooked, demeated), and lamb leg bone (cooked, demeated, like the prior - ie eaten) with just three hours boiling, no vinegar or any added anything. Its not like jelly, but kinda like a apple puree jelly consistancy. Maybe its the pre-cooking, and perhaps also lack of vinegar (or shorted cooking time). I use it for beef stews....

4cbc4488855b0421943b57de0a9018c2

(212)

on February 22, 2013
at 02:26 AM

That's interesting. Most people cook it for much longer, but do not bring it to a boil. My guess is that you still have gelatin because while you do boil the broth, you don't cook it for too long that it breaks down the collagen necessary for gelatin to form.

1
Eb68320515caa0257814a6c97b7e87e6

(10)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:02 AM

I had never made chicken stock before last night. In my attempt I ended up with a 1.25 quart mass of jelly. I thought that I had done some thing wrong- since any of my store bought stock (in my experience) is liquid. Yet, every post here seems to be attempting to create a jelly. I used the carcass of one 4.75lb baked whole chicken and boiled the bones/skin/remains for about 5 hours in an open stock pot. I did add some shredded carrots, 1/2 an onion, and a bay leaf during the boil. But then figured that people use alcohols to extract essential oils from all sorts of things and that vinagar was sometimes used to push bone stocks along. So in went some saki...

Does anyone else use wine/alcohol/saki to make stock? And does any one think that may have been a contributing factor to facilitate the generation of the jelly? Also, why does every one seem to be wanting the stock to be in jelly form?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 20, 2012
at 09:48 AM

^ The store brought stock isnt real stock. (even "real stock")

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 20, 2012
at 09:50 AM

People want gelatin, because gelatin is one of the main nutittional bonuses of bones. The three things -gelatin, glutamine and glucosamine from bones helps heal the gut mucosa (and also ligaments etc)

1
34bb7a5ab8febad68ae07c22bba9c16f

(10)

on May 10, 2012
at 04:48 PM

Stock is made in 3 phases: The first one is optional.

1) Roasting/ Blanching: Roast the bones for extra flavour and colour. It also draws out impurities: discharge the fat and any muddy liquid after roasting the bones. Deglaze the roasting pan and add the liquid to the stock. For extra purity the bones can be quickly blanched before making stock.

2) Drawing gelatine and nutrients out of the stock: Cover the bones with cold water and bring the stock slowly to the boil. Vinegar is optional, I would not put too much. Restaurants don't use it. However, they use tomatoes, which are acidic, too. Acidity draws out nutrients from the bones but also heavy metals from a stainless steel pot. Skim off the grey foam. Optionally repeat by adding cold water or ice to lower the temperature and bring to the boil again whilst skimming and removing more impurities which might make the stock cloudy. Simmering lets impurities and fat rise to the surface where they can be skimmed off. Boiling will lead to impurities and fats stay in the stock. Furthermore, boiling your stock might draw out more nutrients but also draw out proteins too violently and make the stock go cloudy and bitter. Always top up with water so the bones are covered. If they are not covered you are not drawing out nutrients/ gelatine.

3) Reducing: Keeping the bones covered with water at all times ensures the maximum gelatine is drawn out of the bones. Although at the end of your 2, 4, 8, 16 or 20 hours you have drawn out all the gelatine that can be drawn out in that time, your stock is diluted (necessary to get all the gelatine out) and may require reducing.

If your finished stock does not gel a) the bones have not been covered with water during cooking, b) it has not simmered for long enough, c) the bones are too chunky/ not cut up and nutrients and gelatine cannot be drawn out properly, d) the bones are not gelatinous enough: as a general rule, try to include bones and tough cuts from tail, neck, head, joints, feet and wings, or e) it has not been reduced enough.

If your stock is cloudy you have a) used the roasted bones with all the muddy roasting juices, b) used unsuitable vegetables, c) not brought the stock slowly to an initial boil whilst skimming, d) not skimmed the stock whilst cooking, e) boiled the stock instead of slowly simmering, f) not changed the pot when the sides of the pot got dried or burnt stains from reducing too much, or g) smashed the boned before or during cooking and so released loads of impurities .

For a super clear stock clarify with egg whites, minced meat and mirepoix.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 10, 2012
at 05:57 PM

Excellent, thank you!

1
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on May 02, 2012
at 05:02 AM

When trying to make gelled stocks, connective tissue is your friend. As others have mentioned, backs, necks and feet are good for this. Buy whole chickens, and learn to bone them yourself. Save the backs and wings, and when you have four or five chickens worth of those, make some stock.

Packages of chicken wings are my go-to if I need to make some stock and I'm out of saved "parts"; the bone to meat ratio is poor for eating, but great for stock. As an added bonus, since they're less desirable, they're cheaper!

Other than that, your recipe sounds right on. I tend to like a more traditional stock, so carrots, celery and onions go into mine, along with salt and pepper.

1
F40555b9be81e12c2fc460e6fa7d097c

on May 02, 2012
at 03:06 AM

This is going to sound crazy, but try chicken feet. It always makes the most amazing gelatin rich broth, chickeny and delicious. I get mine from my friendly local free-range farmer for $1 a pound. The stuff is gelly at room temp, I have to heat it after I scrape off the fat before I can put it in freezer containers. I always throw a few veggies in mine just for flavor (carrots, celery, and onions), and I use it in just about everything.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 03:15 AM

I went into an Asian grocery store last night for the first time in my life. They had some scary animal parts. Cows foot, pig heart, etc. Had you asked me 3 months ago if I could ever see myself putting a pig foot in my slow cooker, I would have laughed.

16e617676c5ac710e5235e0b773edc0b

(2640)

on May 02, 2012
at 10:33 AM

Ironically the only broth I made which hasn't gelled was the one containing chicken feet and necks. I'm going to try roasting them first before throwing them in the pot.

1
07c86972a3bea0b0dc17752e9d2f5642

on May 02, 2012
at 02:55 AM

Boil it down more. If you don't get gel, take it out the next day and boil it again, letting the water evaporate. My broths give much more jelly when I don't use raw bone-in cuts of meat.

Roast the meat first and de-bone it leaving some small meaty chunks on it to flavor the broth and chuck the bones in a pot with some fresh thyme, carrots, celery and garlic. Cover with water so there's plenty of sloshing room, but don't drown the bones in too much water. Add a glug of vinegar. Keep an eye on it, adding water as you need to. If you do it at a higher temp, like a gentle bubble rather than slow simmer, it should only take a couple hours. Strain and put in the fridge and the next day take the fat layer off and simmer it gently letting any scum rise to the top to skim.

This technique makes a super jelly for me.

1
B97bb053b69b8a1e404c226afced44a0

on May 02, 2012
at 02:35 AM

blueballon's method is pretty similar to mine. When I buy chicken, I always buy bone-in. ALL bones/skin/cartilage gets thrown into a large ziploc bag in the freezer. When the bag gets full, I dump it into my crockpot, cover with water, and toss in a couple of tablespoons of white vinegar. Put it on low overnight (12 hours-ish) and that's it. Unplug it, let it cool, then strain the stock off, strip the bones of any meat (use in soups, stew, etc) and toss the bones. Stock goes into jars which go into the fridge and gel perfectly each time. Good luck!

(By the way, I've tried making stock from raw chicken..it just tastes WRONG to me. Much prefer it made from "leftover" bones)

1
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on May 02, 2012
at 02:20 AM

This is what I do:

Whole chicken, roasted, for dinner. I then strip the leftover meat for a future use (chicken soup, salads, eating cold, etc.) and throw the carcass into a slow-cooker with about 4-ish quarts of water and a little vinegar or white wine. Set on low for about 24 hours. Strain, cool, refrigerate. It almost always gels perfectly that way for me. You can get a good lot of bone broth out of one chicken.

I rarely throw in full meaty drumsticks, etc., mostly because I can't afford to let the meat go to waste and I prefer roasted chicken to boiled.

Just a note--If you can get them, chicken feet or necks work really well. Or chicken or turkey wings, which are far cheaper than the legs.

Bonus: Add a few peppercorns, a bit of sea salt, and a bay leaf or two for extra flavor.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 02:39 AM

Just to be clear, I remove the meat after 8 hours and eat it, tossing the bones a d fat back in for 12 more hours

0
16d6cd8466c64223c67d76676d1546b7

on May 30, 2014
at 05:49 PM

I made beef bone broth a couple of days ago. Got two large soup bones from the butcher and added carrots, onion and celery to the slow cooker with the ore roasted bones, few herbs and spices and some apple cider vinegar and left it alone on a simmer for 24 hours. Then I turned it off, strained it and let it cool so that fat came to the surface and solidified. I scraped that off for use in cooking and put my bone broth back on to simmer and reduce for a few hours. After it had cooled again I put it in a huge glass jar and refrigerated it. Twenty four hours later, it's like beef jelly!

0
3b031bce7c181c10452ee202e2b54dc6

on February 27, 2013
at 05:07 AM

Are chicken bones from any ol' chickens fine?

Or should I stick with free range/organic/as natural as possible chicken?

0
7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

on May 20, 2012
at 02:41 PM

Ok, after my latest failure, (5 of 7), and having isolated each of the variables, I'm prepared to conclude that the bones from one whole chicken, (even with less water), even with just 2T of apple cider vinegar, is not sufficient to make a super-jelly bone broth.

The only 2 broths that were super-jelly had more bones than was from just one whole chicken.

The first success was using 6 turkey drum sticks.

The other success was adding lamb shank bones to one whole set of chicken bones.

Just wanted to post my results in case it's of help to anyone,

Mike

0
5b4fd1d0dcb02b1cc3c666ece9e5983d

(1169)

on May 11, 2012
at 08:07 AM

I make bone broth and get my bones from the 99 Ranch Market chain in Southern California. The store I get my bones from stopped carrying beef feet / hooves for sale individually (now they sell them in 4 packs, too much hoof for me) so I have in the past two broths subbed beef tendon.

Godfrey Daniels, it turns into meat jello when its done. BTW, I don't use meat, just bones and it is delicious.

Unfortunately, not grass fed bones, but with the tendon (1 pound tendon to 6 pounds of roasted bones) it is fabulously gelled when cooled.

0
7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

on May 11, 2012
at 12:02 AM

My last batch came out great.

Two changes:

  1. I used less water: (yielding 8 cups instead of 12).

  2. After the initial 8 hours cooking the whole chicken (cut in pieces), and removing the meat, and returning the bones, and adding 2T of apple cider vinegar, I ALSO ADDED 2 lamb shank bones.

I'm not sure which change resulted in the super gelatinous broth, but it came out great!!!

It just occurred to me that this time I didn't use any veggies (not sure if that mattered).

I'll post the results of my next experiment: are additional bones needed or not!

Just wanted to share, Thanks, Mike

0
8f7a38b9ddf02b185b1713bc8b52676c

on May 09, 2012
at 02:14 PM

I never new you were supposed to make broth for that many hours. I know my mom doesn't do that. But we're Italian, maybe they do it differently. Anyway, I have gotten gel from just a 45 minute simmer. So it can't be lack of time. I think it definitely has to be the joints.

0
57bef671ea7e05631c9fa56f708bcaa9

(258)

on May 02, 2012
at 12:18 PM

I am also a broth-making fail. I have tried many methods - roasted chicken carcass, raw chicken cut up, adding feet or not adding feet, etc. etc. I usually add veggie scraps, so I guess I'm a stock fail. It never gels, but it does have a beautiful color. It always tastes/smells a little funny though, so I never just drink/eat it, but always have to add lots of stuff for soup, or just use it in recipes.

The other day, though, I just used a leftover chicken carcass, no veggies/vinegar, and simmered it for about ~5 hrs because I was tired of investing 20+ hours in a stock that was disappointing.

That time it was a very cloudy, white color - no nice golden chicken-y color (maybe because I didn't include onion skins like usual?), but it smelled AMAZING and it gelled perfectly. Tastes good too, but I am disappointed about the color.

Point is - maybe 12+ hrs is too long? I think I'd rather do it for 4-6 hrs, strain the broth and jar it, then try again with the same chicken bones and see how long I can keep it going.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 11:17 PM

Interesting. From everything I've read, 20 hours should be good. Per the comments above, maybe not enough water is evaporating? However , the fact that it gelled with the turkey makes me think it might be ingredients. I will certainly post any new results from my ongoing experiments.

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