2

votes

How much bone broth do you eat?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 05, 2012 at 6:06 PM

I finally managed to make decent beef bone broth : perfect jello. How many bone broth do you eat, and what are your (health) experiences with it?

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 12, 2012
at 07:22 PM

Cheese.. ugh... cheese made me vomit too, even though I also grew up eating cheese and bread for breakfast!

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 12, 2012
at 07:21 PM

Then, as I said: now that I have bone broth every day, I DON'T have these problems anymore, no more vomiting! THAT is why I can eat grains once in a while now, because I drink bone broth. If you know about the GAPS diet, you know that bone broth heals leaky gut. Leaky gut explains why all these unrelated foods make me vomit. Healed leaky gut, no more vomiting! I enjoy eating a cookie or a tortilla or a bowl of popcorn once in a while like everyone else, thankfully, because of bone broth, now I can :-)

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 12, 2012
at 07:19 PM

To 42: It's not only grains that make me vomit. FIRST, gluten NEVER made me vomit in my life until a couple months (?) ago. So, FIRST, gluten makes me vomit. Fine, I wont eat gluten. THEN popcorn makes me vomit? Uh? OK, I won't eat popcorn. Then, corn makes me vomit. Then tomatoes. No, actually, tomatoes were the first thing that made me vomit. Then spinach. Note, I also never had trouble with tomatoes or spinach in my entire life. Then potatoes. Uh? I grew up eating potatoes! So as you can see this has no rhyme or reason. I DON'T know what's going to make me vomit until I try it.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 12, 2012
at 07:16 PM

Here, more info about the bumpy rings: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granuloma_annulare "It's associated with diabetes and thyroid", "it's cause it's unknown". Psssh!! It quite clearly is GLUTEN!! It's also associated with chron's disease and rheumatoid arthritis, guess what's also associated with those? Gluten! Ha! Pre-paleo my hands were covered in these rings ALL the time, since I ate gluten ALL the time. Now my hands are clear as anyone else's.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 12, 2012
at 07:14 PM

Hi Stefanie, the ring blisters are a small "ring of dots", the same color as the skin. Very itchy. It's NOT ringworm. The ring keeps getting bigger and bigger over time until it blends in with the skin and disappears. Pre-paleo, they never disappeared because I ate gluten all the time. Now eating gluten only once in a blue moon, I get a ring but it goes away after a couple of days.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on March 07, 2012
at 03:25 AM

So, if you know that eating grains makes you vomit, why do you eat grains? I haven't vomited in almost 30 years, which is probably unnatural, but it's not something I ever want to experience again.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on March 07, 2012
at 03:23 AM

I roasted the bones prior. That generated a really strong game-y odor from the marrow fat. I love marrow but this batch was full of bone sawdust and basically inedible.

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on March 06, 2012
at 07:02 PM

It does stink. I lock my crockpots in the office and put a towel next to the door in an attempt to block any smell leakage.

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on March 06, 2012
at 06:25 AM

Hi Luisa, this is a bit off topic but could you explain what the "ring blisters" are that you mention? I have something similar, I think, and it's always been a mystery as to what causes them. Now I'm going to try and up my stock intake and see if they improve..

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:43 AM

Did you roast the bones in the oven until they were nice and brown? Or did you use them raw? Every time I make a batch from raw bones I dump it down the drain. But with roasted bones it smells... D I V I N E !

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 05, 2012
at 09:10 PM

So modest too! ;)

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 05, 2012
at 07:16 PM

Korion, if you reheat the 'jello' it returns to a broth state. You can drink or make sauce or cook rice with it!

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 05, 2012
at 06:48 PM

I don't know, the butcher should be able to answer this since it's his recipe.

Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

(13635)

on March 05, 2012
at 06:21 PM

I just drink my broth from a mug. Once in a great while I'll make a soup with solid pieces parts.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 05, 2012
at 06:18 PM

That doesn't really answer my question :D, but this could help you a bit http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1975347/pdf/archdisch01497-0052.pdf The nutritional value of bone broth is generally unknown, because it varies a lot.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 05, 2012
at 06:17 PM

I thought you got me, but after reading http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1615441&langid=13 I'm not really sure.

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17 Answers

2
Ec6e6cb0bee067776433dea987d6c844

on March 06, 2012
at 01:29 PM

I make it a priority to consume. I make a batch in a giant stockpot, and go through about a gallon a week. I cook my rice in it without water, cook my veggies in it, reduce it to make glazes/sauces and basically eat it however I can.

I don't have health problems, so it's hard to point out anything it's fixed, though consuming it pretty much ensures perfect digestion. It does seem to make me feel better overall and somewhat increase satiety. Energy seems a little higher, and if I drink it when I'm tired or cold, I feel rejuvenated

2
361e96d70d6d3b91d63f6ad975e60ab6

(840)

on March 06, 2012
at 03:12 AM

I would eat it everyday if I could! I occasionally get a big bag of bones from local farmer and I live in heaven for 3 weeks. A $2 dollar bag lasts me the whole day, eat the meat in the morning and save the juice and fat for night to make soup (w/ some kind of veg) Pure awesome!

2
19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:55 AM

I have mostly beef stock, but sometimes chicken. I use it for breakfast soups, cooking potatoes and other root vegetables, to make sauces for meat dishes, or to give a little more flavor to green beans or other vegetables.

I eat it in breakfast soup everyday or nearly everyday.

I make it because I like how it tastes in soups and sauces, BUT I have really really bad sensitivity to gluten (see note), and I noticed that having beef stock everyday has helped me not feel so lousy after I eat grains. For example, normally if I eat grains I end up vomiting the next day, plus I get ugly "ring blisters" on my hands, but as long as I have beef stock everyday I don't get those problems.

So I guess the gelatin helps my intestines! :-)

Note/Edit: I grew up eating grains (bread, popcorn, etc), cheese everyday, spinach, tomatoes, potatoes, but since a couple months ago (?) all these things make me vomit. BUT if I drink bone broth every day, these things don't bother me anymore and I can eat them without vomiting. (See the GAPS diet which heals leaky gut)

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on March 07, 2012
at 03:25 AM

So, if you know that eating grains makes you vomit, why do you eat grains? I haven't vomited in almost 30 years, which is probably unnatural, but it's not something I ever want to experience again.

Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

(605)

on March 06, 2012
at 06:25 AM

Hi Luisa, this is a bit off topic but could you explain what the "ring blisters" are that you mention? I have something similar, I think, and it's always been a mystery as to what causes them. Now I'm going to try and up my stock intake and see if they improve..

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 12, 2012
at 07:22 PM

Cheese.. ugh... cheese made me vomit too, even though I also grew up eating cheese and bread for breakfast!

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 12, 2012
at 07:21 PM

Then, as I said: now that I have bone broth every day, I DON'T have these problems anymore, no more vomiting! THAT is why I can eat grains once in a while now, because I drink bone broth. If you know about the GAPS diet, you know that bone broth heals leaky gut. Leaky gut explains why all these unrelated foods make me vomit. Healed leaky gut, no more vomiting! I enjoy eating a cookie or a tortilla or a bowl of popcorn once in a while like everyone else, thankfully, because of bone broth, now I can :-)

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 12, 2012
at 07:14 PM

Hi Stefanie, the ring blisters are a small "ring of dots", the same color as the skin. Very itchy. It's NOT ringworm. The ring keeps getting bigger and bigger over time until it blends in with the skin and disappears. Pre-paleo, they never disappeared because I ate gluten all the time. Now eating gluten only once in a blue moon, I get a ring but it goes away after a couple of days.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 12, 2012
at 07:19 PM

To 42: It's not only grains that make me vomit. FIRST, gluten NEVER made me vomit in my life until a couple months (?) ago. So, FIRST, gluten makes me vomit. Fine, I wont eat gluten. THEN popcorn makes me vomit? Uh? OK, I won't eat popcorn. Then, corn makes me vomit. Then tomatoes. No, actually, tomatoes were the first thing that made me vomit. Then spinach. Note, I also never had trouble with tomatoes or spinach in my entire life. Then potatoes. Uh? I grew up eating potatoes! So as you can see this has no rhyme or reason. I DON'T know what's going to make me vomit until I try it.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 12, 2012
at 07:16 PM

Here, more info about the bumpy rings: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granuloma_annulare "It's associated with diabetes and thyroid", "it's cause it's unknown". Psssh!! It quite clearly is GLUTEN!! It's also associated with chron's disease and rheumatoid arthritis, guess what's also associated with those? Gluten! Ha! Pre-paleo my hands were covered in these rings ALL the time, since I ate gluten ALL the time. Now my hands are clear as anyone else's.

2
Cba24b8f38b03d442bf6021cebb08e46

(88)

on March 05, 2012
at 07:27 PM

I make my own..usually use it as a base for stews and curries...delicious...I have also rendered my own fat from the suet that I had butchered in the fall. I am friends with someone that raises cows as a hobby and asked to raise it to my specs, he gives me quite a lot of bones and suet as most people don't know what to do with them...very lucky I do, as I make the best stews and curries around!!!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 05, 2012
at 09:10 PM

So modest too! ;)

1
2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

Apple cider vinegar (2 tablespoons) in the crockpot with the raw bones and water to simmer (not boil) for at least 24 hours - perfect broth and nothing better to boil or steam your vegetables with.

1
35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on March 06, 2012
at 07:22 PM

I vary between having a cup or so a day in stew or soup to having maybe a tablespoon or so to give a sauce that velvet touch.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 06, 2012
at 06:45 PM

Just recently I have been having a mug of stock just before I go to work if I'm starting to feel hungry. For quite a while now, I have been taking a 1.5ltr food flask filled with stock and chunks of meat to work every day and I have another mug of stock before my evening meal.
I can't say that I've noticed any health benefits but I really enjoy it.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on March 06, 2012
at 04:09 PM

Next to none really. I'll make broth for a soup a couple times a month, but I don't hold it up as some magical paleo elixir.

1
C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:18 AM

I finally used up the bones I had in the freezer and made a batch. Holy smokes, it stunk the whole house up for days. I ended up freezing it because I couldn't handle the smell. The bones were a mix of grass-fed long and sliced bones, so the source was fine.

I made a big batch of chili with it and the smell was gone. But I couldn't stomach drinking it as-is.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on March 07, 2012
at 03:23 AM

I roasted the bones prior. That generated a really strong game-y odor from the marrow fat. I love marrow but this batch was full of bone sawdust and basically inedible.

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:43 AM

Did you roast the bones in the oven until they were nice and brown? Or did you use them raw? Every time I make a batch from raw bones I dump it down the drain. But with roasted bones it smells... D I V I N E !

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on March 06, 2012
at 07:02 PM

It does stink. I lock my crockpots in the office and put a towel next to the door in an attempt to block any smell leakage.

1
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on March 06, 2012
at 12:57 AM

I use about 32 oz or 4 cups into each stew/recipe calling for water/broth. I use these 32 oz in recipes typically with 3 pounds meat/seafood + 3 pounds veggies that my husband and I consume together over about 3 days. Replacing water with broth makes recipes far more exciting and tasty!

1
D5dff6376e17373751ccf4a10aaa0b34

(274)

on March 05, 2012
at 11:19 PM

I kind of hedge my bets, it is tempting to drink a ton of the stuff, but the nutritional value of broth doesn't seem to be well established. For all I know it could be drawing out heavy metals and concentrating them for my ingestion. Flouride is stored in bones as well, but I'm not really as concerned about that. So, I make my broth at as low a temperature as I can and pretty quickly (8-10 hours) and I only have maybe a cup a day or so. I also take weeks off. I don't have any particular issues I am trying to address, just general health and heading off joint issues one day hopefully!

1
C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on March 05, 2012
at 11:03 PM

I make a double crockpot batch of bone broth every 2 weeks. Mostly I use it for stews, but I'll drink a cup if I'm hungry and no food is handy. I always warm it up first. THe gelatin version is kind of really disgusting to me for textural reasons.

I've started using the fat that rises to the top (tallow?) of the broth as it cools in its' mason jar. I use it for pan frying egg and browning meats. I was paying for rendered duck fat and coconut oil but now I can just make my own yumm cooking fats. It has a really nice flavor and is supposedly quite good for the gut as well.

1
Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:45 PM

I try to have about a cup a day. Still working on getting into the rhythm of making enough of it, and sourcing bones. If it is beef, I usually make it into a simple soup, because I don't like the taste of straight beef broth. As for health experiences, I can't point to anything specific, although I have been feeling pretty good lately :). I personally find that bone broth soup is an awesome rehydrator after a winter workout.

1
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on March 05, 2012
at 06:15 PM

I don't eat any. ;0) But I drink about a gallon a week. 1/2 chicken and 1/2 beef.

My experience is it's very satiating for a liquid, even when really hungry.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 05, 2012
at 06:17 PM

I thought you got me, but after reading http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1615441&langid=13 I'm not really sure.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on March 05, 2012
at 07:16 PM

Korion, if you reheat the 'jello' it returns to a broth state. You can drink or make sauce or cook rice with it!

Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

(13635)

on March 05, 2012
at 06:21 PM

I just drink my broth from a mug. Once in a great while I'll make a soup with solid pieces parts.

1
Ef089e1180f240aa9fd2d089f7f38b45

(279)

on March 05, 2012
at 06:14 PM

On the subject of broth, what is the nutritional value of beef or chicken stock sold at the butchers? Obviously stock has the solid ingredients removed, but what about the proteins and other nutrients?

EDIT: I mean, what does it lack nutritionally compared to broth?

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 05, 2012
at 06:18 PM

That doesn't really answer my question :D, but this could help you a bit http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1975347/pdf/archdisch01497-0052.pdf The nutritional value of bone broth is generally unknown, because it varies a lot.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 05, 2012
at 06:48 PM

I don't know, the butcher should be able to answer this since it's his recipe.

0
A87123772dfaec07079b8fac17b20372

on August 27, 2012
at 12:18 PM

I drink at least one big cup per meal (3 or 4 each day) plus I use to cook veggies or meat and fish with it.

I have been drinking broth for about 2 weeks and my screwed-up gut is finally stating to recover after 18 years of suffering. That's not the only Paleo thing I'm doing but it seems to give a great boost. I'm not still completely healed (I have been Palo for the last 4 months) but things are improving faster with bone broth.

Michael.

0
17fc1ab37cd912b29054e0871a19815f

(0)

on August 27, 2012
at 02:41 AM

.. I am drinking 1 cup a day- in the hopes that it will help me heal, along with physical therapy, for serious, chronic, left ankle 'tendinosis'--

I make relatively small batches of either chicken (24 hrs) or beef (36 hrs) and use a crockpot (for ease: when I used the stovetop, once, it was alot more cleanup..)

it's expensive because of where I live: NYC. I buy bones (chicken feet & necks; beef knuckle & neck) from a local greenmarket- the meat is from range free/grass fed/etc animals- but the bones are quite pricey.. about $7/lb. But I don't want to fool around with buying lesser quality if I am drinking concentrated broth--

I usually add a carrot, an onion, some garlic at some point during the cooking.. but drink it plain, with a little sea salt.

I plan to experiment with adding a little burdock and/or astragalus when I can find these-

I started doing this because I'd read bone broth is therapeutic for soft tissues/collagen growth and I'm hoping that's not wishful thinking!

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