6

votes

How is store-bought broth different from homemade broth?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created November 07, 2011 at 9:00 PM

I recently made my own chicken broth, but honestly the storage and planning ahead aren't realistic for me at the moment. I use it often, generally drinking it on cold days or using it in recipes. Aside from being cheaper, is there a significant nutritional difference between organic store-bought chicken broth and the homemade kind and why?

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 08, 2011
at 08:53 PM

@Cassandra, glad you liked the pics! It was quite delicious and as Curious said, there is an almost silky mouthfeel from the liquified gelatin that can't be replicated through the vegetable starch (corn, potato, etc.) that is used in commercial broths.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 08, 2011
at 08:51 PM

@Futureboy, I generally have some sea salt, herbs, and spices flavoring my pork broth, so I haven't noticed the wet doggy flavor. It may vary from pig to pig, however, depending on how it was raised. Maybe "wet doggy" is the porcine version of gaminess. Also, I used the broth for fasts, but not whole pork. The broth has little fat remaining after it has been skimmed off, so I have no concerns about the o3/o6 balance. In general, I don't worry about o6 from meat because I have virtually eliminated it from seed oils and eat very little nuts.

2bdc990a200584a385650cf68475f095

on November 08, 2011
at 08:15 PM

Thank you :) I was preparing for a battle and I get an "Thank you". People are so amazing :)

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on November 08, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Thank you for the clarification, Firestorm!

15f38b8dbf95a7a8de2bb451851e11db

(10)

on November 08, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Thanks for your honesty...I'll find a better form to try to help...because that's what I was trying to do - help, not advertize. You've made me see that it's not the message people hear, but my anger - of having lost a life because of these deceptions.

2bdc990a200584a385650cf68475f095

on November 08, 2011
at 05:04 PM

I would have never turned "paleo" is it would be advertised this way. Tone is waaay to hypish for me personally. Not to mention it's a misplaced rant, with the original answer being very clear.

96061d386f8929f50a4d71e0420e3d5d

(208)

on November 08, 2011
at 03:52 PM

"Hydrolyzed Yeast" is how they usually hide it in broth

96061d386f8929f50a4d71e0420e3d5d

(208)

on November 08, 2011
at 03:51 PM

And remember, "No Added MSG" does not equal "No MSG"

B36613e945134be5813e6526f9a3a86c

(499)

on November 08, 2011
at 06:17 AM

Aside from the nutritional benefits of gelatin and all the other stuff the presence of which it connotes, the gelatin in homemade stock gives it a better mouthfeel than commercial stock.

C3cb7270d23572bf00bcdbd09efc4b70

(180)

on November 08, 2011
at 02:31 AM

That looks delicious, and you're absolutely right, store bought does not look like that. Thanks for the gelatin link!

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 08, 2011
at 01:09 AM

do you find that pork broth has a funky taste? I always find it kind of, for lack of a better term, wet doggy tasting/smelling. Also, is pork fast optimal in terms of o6/o3 ratios?

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 08, 2011
at 01:09 AM

That's a great question, Futureboy. I don't know the answer. I would guess that it would improve the store bought broth since I believe gelatin has some healthful properties on its own. However, I suspect it still wouldn't be as good as homemade--that usually seems to be the case with pretty much any food. Homemade is nearly always nutritionally superior.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:57 AM

Is it beneficial to add say, Knox gelatin, or Great Lakes gelatin to store bought broth? I do make my own, but does this even approach homemade in terms of dietary quality?

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:16 AM

Too true. I've never seen gelatined store broth.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:15 AM

After skimming the fat off, I rendered out the water (low heat in a skillet) and reserved it (covered in the fridge) for cooking. I'm not fond of wasting food, especially fat!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:08 AM

Beautiful broth! Do you skim the fat for other uses, or what? I usually leave it in mine unless I need fat to start a skillet-meal (but then I usually add broth toward the end with veggies.)

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 07, 2011
at 11:45 PM

My freezer is extremely small, so I re-cook mine every few days and it only gets better! Since mine are more like stews than true broth, each time I re-cook is a chance to throw in something new.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 07, 2011
at 11:43 PM

I have an extremely small freezer so I just re-cook mine every few days--it only gets better!

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 07, 2011
at 10:29 PM

No matter the cooking method, the enzymes will be destroyed by the heat of cooking. What is more important is that most commercial broth are "flavored" -- they are NOT true bone stock. Therefore, some of the nutrient load from the extracted bone (including the gelatin, minerals, etc.) will not be available in commercial stock. Even Whole Foods organic stock uses water, "organic chicken concentrate", cane juice, and things like "onion powder", organic corn starch, and powdered "organic" carrots. Not bad, but Definitely not the same thing as throwing some chicken backs in a crockpot.

8cbb06eb84dad8d2db56fcc4d8bdc0ba

on November 07, 2011
at 09:52 PM

i have to use store bought also, but it almost always has evaporated cane juice in it, and even the low sodiums have quite a bit of sodium. I use Pacific and Whole foods brands...

  • C3cb7270d23572bf00bcdbd09efc4b70

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9 Answers

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4
Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 07, 2011
at 09:59 PM

When I make a proper bone broth, it becomes a semi-solid when refrigerated (the gelatin turns it into a literal "meat jello"), something that I can't recall ever happening with a store bought broth.

Here's a pic of some cooled broth that was simply the leftover cooking liquid from a pork shoulder that I crock-potted...

how-is-store-bought-broth-different-from-homemade-broth?

At this point, I had already skimmed off the top layer of fat (the yellow stuff in the background), and was ready to liquefy the broth by reheating it in a pot with some filtered water.

(Full recipe here)

(Link to Paleohacks.com post on benefits of gelatin)

C3cb7270d23572bf00bcdbd09efc4b70

(180)

on November 08, 2011
at 02:31 AM

That looks delicious, and you're absolutely right, store bought does not look like that. Thanks for the gelatin link!

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:15 AM

After skimming the fat off, I rendered out the water (low heat in a skillet) and reserved it (covered in the fridge) for cooking. I'm not fond of wasting food, especially fat!

B36613e945134be5813e6526f9a3a86c

(499)

on November 08, 2011
at 06:17 AM

Aside from the nutritional benefits of gelatin and all the other stuff the presence of which it connotes, the gelatin in homemade stock gives it a better mouthfeel than commercial stock.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 08, 2011
at 01:09 AM

do you find that pork broth has a funky taste? I always find it kind of, for lack of a better term, wet doggy tasting/smelling. Also, is pork fast optimal in terms of o6/o3 ratios?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:08 AM

Beautiful broth! Do you skim the fat for other uses, or what? I usually leave it in mine unless I need fat to start a skillet-meal (but then I usually add broth toward the end with veggies.)

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 08, 2011
at 08:51 PM

@Futureboy, I generally have some sea salt, herbs, and spices flavoring my pork broth, so I haven't noticed the wet doggy flavor. It may vary from pig to pig, however, depending on how it was raised. Maybe "wet doggy" is the porcine version of gaminess. Also, I used the broth for fasts, but not whole pork. The broth has little fat remaining after it has been skimmed off, so I have no concerns about the o3/o6 balance. In general, I don't worry about o6 from meat because I have virtually eliminated it from seed oils and eat very little nuts.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 08, 2011
at 08:53 PM

@Cassandra, glad you liked the pics! It was quite delicious and as Curious said, there is an almost silky mouthfeel from the liquified gelatin that can't be replicated through the vegetable starch (corn, potato, etc.) that is used in commercial broths.

2
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:24 PM

One usually has MSG and one does not.

96061d386f8929f50a4d71e0420e3d5d

(208)

on November 08, 2011
at 03:52 PM

"Hydrolyzed Yeast" is how they usually hide it in broth

2
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 07, 2011
at 10:32 PM

It's really not the same since store bought broth has other additives and definitely doesn't have much gelatin. What part of making your own is causing you difficulty? I find it pretty easy to make--once you start it you don't really have to do anything until it's time to strain it 24 hours later--and I store it in stackable containers in the freezer so it doesn't take up all that much space.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 07, 2011
at 11:43 PM

I have an extremely small freezer so I just re-cook mine every few days--it only gets better!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 07, 2011
at 11:45 PM

My freezer is extremely small, so I re-cook mine every few days and it only gets better! Since mine are more like stews than true broth, each time I re-cook is a chance to throw in something new.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 08, 2011
at 01:09 AM

That's a great question, Futureboy. I don't know the answer. I would guess that it would improve the store bought broth since I believe gelatin has some healthful properties on its own. However, I suspect it still wouldn't be as good as homemade--that usually seems to be the case with pretty much any food. Homemade is nearly always nutritionally superior.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:16 AM

Too true. I've never seen gelatined store broth.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:57 AM

Is it beneficial to add say, Knox gelatin, or Great Lakes gelatin to store bought broth? I do make my own, but does this even approach homemade in terms of dietary quality?

2
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 07, 2011
at 09:03 PM

As with everything else, you need to be a wary shopper. What does the label say, even if it's organic?

One advantage of homemade broth is freshness, of course, and your complete control of what's in it. I, for example, always adulterate mine with things like onion, carrots, celery and other favorites.

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 08, 2011
at 11:13 AM

Beware the "Natural Flavor" ingredient for one thing, it can hide lots of things, such as MSG, some of it could be from wheat.

Even if it says organic, it may contain some non-organic ingredients, some of those may be GMOs.

Whenever you take a shortcut by buying pre-packaged anything, you can bet that the manufacturer of that product (because that's what it is), has taken far more shortcuts that you, yourself would not have. They have to create things that are shelf-stable for a very long time (preservatives), look good (coloring), and taste good (MSG or other added flavors), and do so at the lowest possible cost, so as to keep their profit margins high.

Somethings like MSG and sugar - in any form, are there because they're also addictive.

Do you really want to eat that way? I'd rather do without the broth if I didn't have the time to make it.

96061d386f8929f50a4d71e0420e3d5d

(208)

on November 08, 2011
at 03:51 PM

And remember, "No Added MSG" does not equal "No MSG"

1
6bfbc7e749d378c510c49bfee774f457

(110)

on November 08, 2011
at 05:45 AM

If it's time you don't have to make it, if you haven't already - use a slow cooker instead of a stove. That way you can start it before bed or before work etc. and its done with little effort, and you don't have to monitor it.

1
15f38b8dbf95a7a8de2bb451851e11db

on November 08, 2011
at 04:54 AM

The difference between store bought soup and home-made is this: (This is directed at anyone, as I myself was once blind)

The truth to keep in mind ??? with EVERY FOOD DECISION WE MAKE ??? is that Food Industry has become solely an industry for PROFIT ??? exploiting our human sensory attributes as a means to acquire wealth: People in the millions driven by senses X food-products X breakfast X brunch X lunch X dinner X dessert X snacks X snacks X snacks X midnight-snacks X movie-snacks = $$$ABUNDANCE$$$. Times this by our desire to ease our labor ??? which is intensified by the need to survive by food (and by our proclivity to indulgences)???and we???ve transferred our power ??? and our health/lives AND intelligence??? over to the Food Industry makers. This all began before our times in the Forties, when convenience foods began mostly. So our generations have not learned where our bodies??? nutrition factually comes from ??? where our cells actually gain their life-force from to survive and multiply (and this info is missing from our education ??? even from Medical education ??? yes! Bet you did not know that???our doctors are NOT taught nutrition). Of course???we don???t till the soil, we don???t plant, we don???t harvest, we don???t feed animals, we don???t milk cows, we don???t peel pods???I guess we never thought that a time would come that we would have to explain to generations of humans that their survival totally depends on Earth???s vegetation, that most foods on a supermarket shelf does not come from anything living on a farm, and that a fruit roll-up is far from coming from a real whole fruit???.and even that most or all active bacteria found in yogurt died before shipping to all Shop-Rites, and that too much unfermented soy (a non-western food) disrupts our endocrine system. Our bodies, through increasing diseases, are SCREAMING to be re-educated about all this.

To this add that our FDA lies to us and withholds information about the contents listed on all food labels, that they have their own dictionary ??? no, encyclopedia ??? where our standard English words have been re-defined for their and the Food Industry???s purposes (profit): natural is no longer natural, organic is sometimes organic but sometimes partially organic, toxic ingredients change their names when they become popular or known by a wide audience. That they have also re-defined what is classified as food (Earth???s food ??? the ones that has kept us alive and evolving for millennia as well as for millennia without invented pharmaceuticals to ???rescue??? us from nature) because now ,food is all that which can be injected with harmful bacteria, injected with genetic DNA from insects and toxic bacteria (GMOs =Genetically Modified Organisms???soy, corn, cotton, canola oil, papaya, rice???250,000 Indian farmers have committed suicide to date because of GMO crop failure??? recent science indicating intestinal disruption due to GMOs), food whose atoms can be corrupted, whose electrons may be modified, radiated with gamma rays, pulled apart, broken from, burned from, smashed from, extracted from, created from waste products, made from toxins, made from poisons ??? what was once a living whole food complex: Vegetation ??? architecture designed specifically for our bodily cells??? consumption. The evidence to nature???s innate INTELLIGENCE is that even WE don???t know its full knowledge...that without vegetation ??? our cells simply DIE. We even gave it a name: starvation. Sooo???

WHY are medical scientists looking for disease solely in viruses and bacteria?? ???.when the food designed by nature???s intelligence to feed our cells ??? to CREATE OUR CELLS, OUR FLESH ??? have been converted into monstrosities by our food industry, scientists, and trusted FDA?? Don???t believe this? Research it. Let???s use our own intelligence before we are all left to resort to pharmaceuticals for Alzheimer???s or dementia.

Those we have trusted with food we were once personally stewards of, are failing us. We need to take back our birth right ??? if no one is educating us, we need to educate ourselves and each other and take back our power AND responsibility to OURSELVES. We were MEANT to get on our hands and knees and toil the soil. We need to re-acquaint ourselves with our needs???.with what is responsible for our physical survival. Really???.does it sound rational not to know which foods we hold in our mouths and we chew and swallow and run through our veins and brains??? to keep us alive AND healthy? Ha ha???. we wash our hands with anti-bacterials??? but then place onto our tongues food modified with DNA from a toxic bacteria (GMO) ??? savoring every moment of it? Helloo? How much more unconscious can they turn us into?

Anyway, don???t just read labels???learn about the new/old food label language and how our own US Department of Agriculture and food industries grows , changes, and prepares foods we take into our bellies.

Much info to learn: A must watch: http://www.seedsofdeception.com/Public/Home/index.cfm http://truefoodnow.org/campaigns/ MUST HAVE: http://truefoodnow.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/cfs-shoppers-guide.pdf A lot of archived information and many free ebooks here: http://naturalnews.com

Salud!

2bdc990a200584a385650cf68475f095

on November 08, 2011
at 05:04 PM

I would have never turned "paleo" is it would be advertised this way. Tone is waaay to hypish for me personally. Not to mention it's a misplaced rant, with the original answer being very clear.

15f38b8dbf95a7a8de2bb451851e11db

(10)

on November 08, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Thanks for your honesty...I'll find a better form to try to help...because that's what I was trying to do - help, not advertize. You've made me see that it's not the message people hear, but my anger - of having lost a life because of these deceptions.

2bdc990a200584a385650cf68475f095

on November 08, 2011
at 08:15 PM

Thank you :) I was preparing for a battle and I get an "Thank you". People are so amazing :)

0
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on November 08, 2011
at 12:04 AM

Biggest difference to me is that my homemade chicken stock tastes better than store-bought.

0
C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

on November 07, 2011
at 10:02 PM

Well, don't broths have beneficial enzymes in them that would be killed in the aseptic packaging process or the canning? I could be really off on this one.

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 07, 2011
at 10:29 PM

No matter the cooking method, the enzymes will be destroyed by the heat of cooking. What is more important is that most commercial broth are "flavored" -- they are NOT true bone stock. Therefore, some of the nutrient load from the extracted bone (including the gelatin, minerals, etc.) will not be available in commercial stock. Even Whole Foods organic stock uses water, "organic chicken concentrate", cane juice, and things like "onion powder", organic corn starch, and powdered "organic" carrots. Not bad, but Definitely not the same thing as throwing some chicken backs in a crockpot.

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on November 08, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Thank you for the clarification, Firestorm!

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