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Does deer bone broth small and taste that bad.

Answered on February 02, 2018
Created January 10, 2015 at 11:29 PM

I just made my first batch of bone broth. Made from the back leg of a deer that's been kept in my freezer for a month.  The meat was great, cut it up and cooked it yesterday,  and made my broth today.  In the crockpot on low for 14hrs. The bone still had a good amount of meat on it, when I put it in, I only put 2 garlic cloves in with 1tbsp apple cider vinegar.  When the broth was done it smelled bad, put it in Mason jars let it cool then skimmed the fat off. I drank it and it's horrible, is bone broth a required taste or did I do something wrong?  My stomach is also not feeling all the good after it. 

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5 Answers

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C958716f4af7692564e82dc199fb0815

on February 02, 2018
at 05:01 PM

It might be more of an acquired taste for you. I definitely can't drink it straight in a mug like some people do, but it is great for stews, braising meat, or deglazing pans. The best venison bones are either 1) joint bones (hips, knees, etc.), which have lots of cartilage and collagen that will help your broth gel, or 2) marrow bones (e.g., mostly femurs), which have nutrients to add. I always add some meat (shank meat or whatever's left on the bones themselves, as I think the roasting process of the meat adds some great flavor. Definitely make sure you skim the fat thoroughly, as deer fat is just terrible tasting.

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Medium avatar

(167)

on January 12, 2015
at 06:25 AM

If you spend a few weeks making more common broths from chicken, beef, pork, and even fish, you'll start to get a feel for what's right and what's off. Than you should try again with the deer leg! I think bone broth smells great, but my roommate says it makes the house stink and all his friends hate it. You might just not like the smell. 

As a side note, sometimes when I have a batch of broth that tastes sub-par, adding strong-tasting things like liver puree, ginger and garlic, will round it out and it will still make a good soup. I dont know if that would help for a deer-leg broth, though. Might be incurably yucky. 

 You might give your current batch to the dog, if you have one. 

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Medium avatar

on January 11, 2015
at 02:36 AM

So Instead of tossing it, I ju have to stomach the taste n smell, sense it is still good for my health. 

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56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on January 11, 2015
at 01:34 AM

As Matt says. Your error was in leaving the meat on. Use clean bones next time, with cartilage, marrow and tendons, but no muscle.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 11, 2015
at 02:33 AM

Marrow is no good, it's too high in fat, it will be gamey. 

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 11, 2015
at 01:14 AM

That's venison for you. It's gamey. Not bad for you, just bad tasting. Bone broth is not magic stuff, it's just good culinarily practice. You have to use the right bones though. 

Medium avatar

(0)

on January 11, 2015
at 11:27 PM

What r some good bones to use? 

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