20

votes

Do you want to finally know the nutritional properties of bone broth?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 19, 2012 at 2:21 PM

Many of us are big fans of bone broth. I've been making it for a couple years now with nothing more than grass-fed beef bones, a bit of vinegar, and a 48-hour simmer.

We know that the gelatin content is a reason in of itself to consume the stuff, but the nutritional properties (in particular, mineral content) of broth made in this fashion has just been speculative.

Well, now we have a chance to find out. I found a company (http://www.foodtestinglab.com/) who can run the tests, and got their pricing. I'm willing to make the broth as described above and send it to them. The goal of this thread is to pool the money together. I figure we can use PayPal so that everyone is protected, but I'm open to ideas. (I'm pledging $50 to start us off, but don't use that amount as a benchmark -- any amount will help.)

Below are our testing options. I think it'd be awesome to get the Complete Nutritional Analysis and Mineral Package done, but I'm more interested in the latter. We can also add additional minerals ($35 each) if folks are interested. So another goal of this thread is to get a consensus on what to test.

So, let's hear what people think. Thanks everyone!

(Patrick -- I'd like to officially request this thread be linked at the top of the PH page.)

-Terry

Complete Nutritional Analysis: $525

Protein Moisture Ash Total Dietary Fiber Cholesterol Fat profile Sugar profile Sodium Iron Calcium Vit A Vit C Carbs Calories Calories from fat

Mineral Package: $180

(Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Zn)

Minerals, individual: $35.00 each

(Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, S, Sc, Se, Si, Sn, Ti, V, W Zn, other ??? inquire)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

EDIT, 03/19 7:19pm: Chipin has been down all day, so I created a new funding spot. This is just for the mineral package. $180 - my $50 + $7 (fees): http://www.thepoint.com/campaigns/campaign-0-4066

You only get charged if we reach the funding goal. You get my name & address (which is where The Point sends the check). I don't know what else I can do. If you feel that a scam artist would come to PH and pretend to do a bone broth test to steal money from people, well... I'm not really sure what to tell you. :-)

2d551979414f10c1e5c6cd57fe3c6658

(125)

on March 21, 2012
at 05:33 PM

To increase the glucosamine and chondroitin in bone broth, add egg shells and shrimp shells to the pot. I save these scraps in the freezer and dump them in with the bones whenever I make broth.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 21, 2012
at 02:08 PM

Hmm, I wonder why I got skin issues from grass-fed beef fat. Doesn't make sense.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 20, 2012
at 10:58 PM

Well, looks like I have failed. I guess the Debbie Downers even succeeded at changing the minds of those who were originally interested in donating. Too bad. Thanks a bunch Patrick for giving it a chance.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 10:04 PM

Chipin has been down all afternoon. Sigh. Maybe it just isn't meant to be.

8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5

(2433)

on March 19, 2012
at 10:04 PM

Chipin has been down all afternoon. Sigh. Maybe it isn't meant to be.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on March 19, 2012
at 08:40 PM

Chipin link times out.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on March 19, 2012
at 08:38 PM

My source of bones is the same butcher, and I always get joint-y (!) bones. Just today I got non-jelly -like stock with only fluffy fat covering, while I've also made stock from similar bones which ended up being able to be cut with a knife, same with the fat layer.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 07:45 PM

Oh, I hear you :) same as I'd expect anyone to think if I was the one offering to do something like this. Whole lot easier to say YO ROBB WTF IS OUR $$?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 07:22 PM

@Danielle, the advantage of chilling before removing the fat is that you can just peel it off the top. I've definitely used a flat spoon to skim liquid fat from a warm broth but it takes longer. Again, if chicken fat works for you great--it just doesn't agree with me.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:51 PM

The stock that I made was chicken - so perhaps i'll need to just skim the fat off. I did freeze what I didn't drink at the time - will I be able to remove the fat once i reheat it?

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:47 PM

Yeah, I like/respect Terry as much as any paleo guru, and I applaud his effort too. It would just be easier to sue a guru if he ran away with my money ;)

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:38 PM

I drink bone broth and use it in my cooking because it is deeply flavorful and satisfying. Vitamin Delicious!

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:21 PM

I drank some straight out of the crockpot. I also brought some to work the next day and drank it to end my fast. Both times - hard to stomach. Also, can someone tell me the benefit of cooling it first?

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:18 PM

That said, though...it would be interesting if like, FTA Richard was doing this and writing it up. Not to say that Terry or anyone else couldn't though, and for that I applaud his effort.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:17 PM

It's the information/documentation that counts. I agree with most of your points and had already raised a few of them, though I wouldn't say that being a "paleo guru" would be better than a "nobody". Every somebody is a nobody at first, right? :)

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:14 PM

@Korion, I stir the fat back in to the broth/stew if it's beef/lamb/duck. I toss it it's pork/chicken as they don't agree with me.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:12 PM

@Danielle Did you drink it with the fat right out of the crock pot. If I do that, I get problems with my skin on my forehead (don't ask me why, I NEVER get skin issues there normally) and the taste is horrible. Now I first cool it down, then remove the fat, then I drink it. That works fine.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:08 PM

+1 for recording everything in MINUTE DETAIL! :)

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 19, 2012
at 05:54 PM

Really cool of Patrick to actually put this on top of PH!

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 05:48 PM

Ack, Glucosamine is $250 and Chondroitin is $400.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 05:19 PM

Hey. They offer Glucosamine & Chondroitin testing. I'll get the pricing.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:59 PM

Mine is incredibly tasty, but then I throw all kinds of stuff in and enjoy the taste of animal fat. I'm not sure how different it is to making stews really.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:48 PM

Nance, I'm also concerned with the potential harm that may be caused by people who recommend bone broth to supp calcium. How many Paleo parents have been advised to stop giving their kids dairy, thinking that broth will suffice? A definitive study is needed! ;) Broth as a source of gelatin is a no-brainer, lol.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:46 PM

@Nance, thanks! Although i've been paleo for almost a year, i've just now decided to venture into the world of bone broth. Will try it in stews instad of straight.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:39 PM

Nice links, April!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:31 PM

I always get hard jelly but I go out of my way to mix marrow and joint bones. I think Wisper's point is spot-on.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:28 PM

@IC: Definitely. :-) Pictures will be a big help to show what went in to the crock pot and what came out of it.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:26 PM

Hmm, my stock is much more consistent -- like jelly, with about an inch of hard fat on top. (I do have a single source for my bones however.) You're correct that results will vary, but that's true with any kind of food.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:23 PM

@Terry: I'm not going to post another answer, but if and when you do this, I would heavily document the process with lots of pictures (and possibly a video for youtube?) to help put people's questions to rest about how it was prepared, what you used, etc...because you KNOW there'll be lots of that! :)

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:20 PM

@DanielleNO812 Absolutely. Or we just do a subset of the tests (e.g., just the $180 test) if the chipper-inners prefer that.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:20 PM

Thanks for the link

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:19 PM

Ah yes, that's what I'm talkin' about Nance! :)

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:18 PM

I've learned that I like it "in stuff" more than drinking it straight. Every time I make anything that would normally call for water, I use a jar or three of broth. The flavor of my homemade creations has actually improved quite a bit since I've been doing this. I usually only drink a cup of it by itself when I first make it to test the flavor and such. The rest I put in jars and refrigerate/freeze.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:15 PM

I personally don't feel the need to drink the broth straight. I add my favorite meats and vegetables and enjoy stews. It's whatever you like and enjoy.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:14 PM

@Nemesis, those are good points. I have noticed in a few places that people talk mostly about minerals while I look at gelatin, etc.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:05 PM

@Nemesis The room temp measurements in the study were from "broth" that wasn't cooked. I think shipping cooked broth to the company at normal temperatures will be fine.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:04 PM

@greymouser I'm hoping PayPal's policies will be enough. Kickstarter's fees were crazy, and they wanted me to create an Amazon Payments Business account even though I'm not a business.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:02 PM

Question - if we "Chip In" and not enough money is collected to perform the tests, are we refunded?

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:58 PM

How would you get the broth samples to them without also potentially degrading the nutritional properties? That link that Korion posted showed all sorts of different numbers when taken at 100C and room temperature.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Another reason to try a kickstarter - there is a modicum (however small) of protection that people are going to (try to) do what they say with the money.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:43 PM

I think it might be helpful for people who recommend bone broth as a significant source of calcium and other minerals, in lieu of dairy and supplements. If anything, promote bone broth for joint and digestive health, but not for the other stuff that it's only purported to have.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:33 PM

You're right, forgot to include that. http://www.foodtestinglab.com/

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:31 PM

I don't drink broth for the nutritional value personally, but for the gelatin and hopefully for things like glucosamine. It improves digestion for the upcoming meal.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:07 PM

Korion: Thanks for that link, hadn't seen it. Adds some weight to the theory that broth isn't as nutritional as many of us may be hoping.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 02:58 PM

ChipIn link added to the original post. Thanks greymouser!

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 19, 2012
at 02:58 PM

Awesome initiative though, I'll chip in a little bit too.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 19, 2012
at 02:58 PM

There's already this study btw : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1975347/pdf/archdisch01497-0052.pdf

F02990386b12528111740ad6279ba29d

(1363)

on March 19, 2012
at 02:55 PM

I'll chip in a little bit!

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on March 19, 2012
at 02:45 PM

http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on March 19, 2012
at 02:43 PM

Would be interesting to know pressure cooked stock as well, since it doesnt take as long to cook, but thats extra money. Flavour is beter, that i know from own experiments.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 19, 2012
at 02:31 PM

Awesome. Maybe kickstarter this to help organize the fund-raising?

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12 Answers

11
9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:19 PM

I'm not sure how valid, if at all, such a test would be. The stocks I make vary immensely in consistence, even with bones that are superficially identical. I've had stock which turned into jelly, and I've had stock which is almost as fluid as water, and everything in between. Sometimes the fat flows to the surface and can be lifted off in sheets, sometimes it's just a thin semi-liquid foamy top.

It also changes depending on how much (if any) cartilage, joints and hooves you include, so your results will not be indicative of what you get at home. Finally, different source of meat (grass-fed) probably has a big impact.

But perhaps if you record the type of bones, how you made it, etc. in minute detail we could make guesstimates on how our own stock would compare. Research has to start from somewhere.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:26 PM

Hmm, my stock is much more consistent -- like jelly, with about an inch of hard fat on top. (I do have a single source for my bones however.) You're correct that results will vary, but that's true with any kind of food.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on March 19, 2012
at 08:38 PM

My source of bones is the same butcher, and I always get joint-y (!) bones. Just today I got non-jelly -like stock with only fluffy fat covering, while I've also made stock from similar bones which ended up being able to be cut with a knife, same with the fat layer.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:31 PM

I always get hard jelly but I go out of my way to mix marrow and joint bones. I think Wisper's point is spot-on.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:08 PM

+1 for recording everything in MINUTE DETAIL! :)

10
65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on March 19, 2012
at 07:42 PM

Does anyone else feel that, while very interesting, the cost outweighs the value received for these tests? We know that it is a source of nutrients... call me crazy, but that's enough for me.

I think spending $525 plus $400 for chondroiton and $250 for glucosamine, $180 for a mineral package and $35X[x] for other minerals really starts adding up.

Plus: our broth bones are sourced differently. I probably use a different amount of water, vinegar, cook it for a different length of time, at a different temperature or using a different method.

The idea is amazing, and I love that the community has discussions like this and tries to work together for the common good, but this is like performing an experiment one time & assuming that the results will ALWAYS be the same.

6
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on March 19, 2012
at 02:40 PM

With all the biochemists etc in the field of paleo, i am kind of puzzled why we dont it already :)

4
Medium avatar

(10663)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:30 PM

Hey all, I found this to be a decent analysis of bone broth: http://www.townsendletter.com/FebMarch2005/broth0205.htm

A study on the content of bone & vegetable broths: http://adc.bmj.com/content/9/52/251.full.pdf

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:39 PM

Nice links, April!

3
0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:27 PM

"I found a company who can run the tests, and got their pricing."

Do you mind sharing the name of the company? Or a link perhaps?

No offense, but I could make up some numbers myself and get folks to "chip in" for them :)

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:33 PM

You're right, forgot to include that. http://www.foodtestinglab.com/

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:20 PM

Thanks for the link

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:04 PM

@greymouser I'm hoping PayPal's policies will be enough. Kickstarter's fees were crazy, and they wanted me to create an Amazon Payments Business account even though I'm not a business.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Another reason to try a kickstarter - there is a modicum (however small) of protection that people are going to (try to) do what they say with the money.

1
B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:07 PM

A mineral analysis seems useless to me. Based on the study I posted above there will probably not be a lot of calcium or magnesium in it. If those 2 minerals aren't abundant, then I don't think any minerals will be.

Like PaleoGal, I am way more interested in glucosamine, chondroitin, ... It's probably a good idea to do this seriously and not just go with a mineral test. What would actually be even better is if one of the paleo gurus would take responsability and make a thread on their (popular) blog. Don't get me wrong, Terry, I really really like your idea, but I have no idea who you are. As far as I know you could just be someone who needs money fast and will run away with it. We all need some kind of guarantee if we're gonna "chip in".

And if you happen to do it, make it worthwhile. We need pictures and/or videos, everything we can get!

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:18 PM

That said, though...it would be interesting if like, FTA Richard was doing this and writing it up. Not to say that Terry or anyone else couldn't though, and for that I applaud his effort.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 07:45 PM

Oh, I hear you :) same as I'd expect anyone to think if I was the one offering to do something like this. Whole lot easier to say YO ROBB WTF IS OUR $$?

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:17 PM

It's the information/documentation that counts. I agree with most of your points and had already raised a few of them, though I wouldn't say that being a "paleo guru" would be better than a "nobody". Every somebody is a nobody at first, right? :)

2d551979414f10c1e5c6cd57fe3c6658

(125)

on March 21, 2012
at 05:33 PM

To increase the glucosamine and chondroitin in bone broth, add egg shells and shrimp shells to the pot. I save these scraps in the freezer and dump them in with the bones whenever I make broth.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:47 PM

Yeah, I like/respect Terry as much as any paleo guru, and I applaud his effort too. It would just be easier to sue a guru if he ran away with my money ;)

1
03525a7d89c96efe387b86be91fee9a5

on March 19, 2012
at 05:01 PM

I like this idea, but I think it misses some of the big benefits (IMO) of bone broths- glucosamine/chondroitin (what else am I missing?)

I agree that values would vary highly depending on how you make bone broth, but I still think this would be helpful to get an idea what orders of magnitude we're talking about when it comes to the tested elements.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 05:19 PM

Hey. They offer Glucosamine & Chondroitin testing. I'll get the pricing.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 05:48 PM

Ack, Glucosamine is $250 and Chondroitin is $400.

1
Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

on March 19, 2012
at 04:01 PM

I, too, would be interested. It seems to be recommended often here on PH and I would like to know the resoning behind it.

I made my first batch of bone broth last week and personally - the taste was a little much for me to handle. I choked it down, but it wasn't easy!

I'm completely open to consuming things that are optimal for my health, I just perfer to have data to back it up.

At this time, for me anyway, if i'm going to "learn" to like bone broth I would be interested to know for what reason!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:15 PM

I personally don't feel the need to drink the broth straight. I add my favorite meats and vegetables and enjoy stews. It's whatever you like and enjoy.

C36d3b2d7c557719a24628062aa51146

(100)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:20 PM

@DanielleNO812 Absolutely. Or we just do a subset of the tests (e.g., just the $180 test) if the chipper-inners prefer that.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:18 PM

I've learned that I like it "in stuff" more than drinking it straight. Every time I make anything that would normally call for water, I use a jar or three of broth. The flavor of my homemade creations has actually improved quite a bit since I've been doing this. I usually only drink a cup of it by itself when I first make it to test the flavor and such. The rest I put in jars and refrigerate/freeze.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 07:22 PM

@Danielle, the advantage of chilling before removing the fat is that you can just peel it off the top. I've definitely used a flat spoon to skim liquid fat from a warm broth but it takes longer. Again, if chicken fat works for you great--it just doesn't agree with me.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:19 PM

Ah yes, that's what I'm talkin' about Nance! :)

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:59 PM

Mine is incredibly tasty, but then I throw all kinds of stuff in and enjoy the taste of animal fat. I'm not sure how different it is to making stews really.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:46 PM

@Nance, thanks! Although i've been paleo for almost a year, i've just now decided to venture into the world of bone broth. Will try it in stews instad of straight.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:14 PM

@Korion, I stir the fat back in to the broth/stew if it's beef/lamb/duck. I toss it it's pork/chicken as they don't agree with me.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:02 PM

Question - if we "Chip In" and not enough money is collected to perform the tests, are we refunded?

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:51 PM

The stock that I made was chicken - so perhaps i'll need to just skim the fat off. I did freeze what I didn't drink at the time - will I be able to remove the fat once i reheat it?

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:21 PM

I drank some straight out of the crockpot. I also brought some to work the next day and drank it to end my fast. Both times - hard to stomach. Also, can someone tell me the benefit of cooling it first?

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 21, 2012
at 02:08 PM

Hmm, I wonder why I got skin issues from grass-fed beef fat. Doesn't make sense.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 19, 2012
at 06:12 PM

@Danielle Did you drink it with the fat right out of the crock pot. If I do that, I get problems with my skin on my forehead (don't ask me why, I NEVER get skin issues there normally) and the taste is horrible. Now I first cool it down, then remove the fat, then I drink it. That works fine.

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:37 PM

May I say, not particularly? I don't happen to think our level of food science is very complete.

My personal n=1 says my joints and well-being improve when I consume home-made bone broth. After a week or two without it, problems start to resurface and I find myself hungry for bone broth.

Does it really matter what's in it that triggers such a great response, over and over and over? And, will we find/identify/understand whatever it is?

It's a fun inquiry and I'll read the findings with fond interest, most likely sipping bone broth while I do so.

Just saying.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 19, 2012
at 03:43 PM

I think it might be helpful for people who recommend bone broth as a significant source of calcium and other minerals, in lieu of dairy and supplements. If anything, promote bone broth for joint and digestive health, but not for the other stuff that it's only purported to have.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:48 PM

Nance, I'm also concerned with the potential harm that may be caused by people who recommend bone broth to supp calcium. How many Paleo parents have been advised to stop giving their kids dairy, thinking that broth will suffice? A definitive study is needed! ;) Broth as a source of gelatin is a no-brainer, lol.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 19, 2012
at 04:14 PM

@Nemesis, those are good points. I have noticed in a few places that people talk mostly about minerals while I look at gelatin, etc.

0
E90ae0c492c9c18abbe5430a07b6d385

on April 26, 2013
at 12:55 AM

The study posted above called "Bone and Vegetable broth" was performed in 1934 on veal bones.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1975347/pdf/archdisch01497-0052.pdf

The calcium content of the broth was not very high. This may have been because veal bones were used. I have been told that chicken bones yield the highest calcium content.

The key to releasing calcium it seems is the use of an acid. Human studies show that an acid diet leads to a higher amount of calcium detected in urine. Although I am not certain that the calcium is being leached from our bones.

I need to do more research.

0
2336245491a87ee15d4fb8f8f8283909

(1173)

on September 24, 2012
at 05:08 PM

I think the nutritional content will probably vary significantly depending on the bones and method you use....If you would like to increase the nutritional content, try simmering them on low for a week and keep throwing in fresh bones and vegetables. The bones (some of them) will become so soft they crumble....I've been eating them.

The best bones I've found to use are cows feet, pigs feet, pork hocks and chicken bones. I have yet to try fish.

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