2

votes

Can I chew soft/softened bones?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 06, 2011 at 9:59 AM

I make bone broth in a pressure cooker. When using lamb or goat or chicken, the bones come out very soft. I tried chewing on some which had some gelatinous substance left on them and they were very palatable. Is it OK to do so? Since they consist mostly of calcium and minerals, is it possible to overdose on calcium or other minerals contained in the bones? (Of course, I wont eat a ton of them)

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on September 30, 2011
at 07:33 PM

You don't want to feed them bones straight from an oven-baked chicken or something, but when they've been pressure-cooked or boiled for a long time, they're very soft. You can literally crumble them between your fingers. No sharp edges at all.

22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on May 06, 2011
at 01:04 PM

Great question. I know when I roast chickens I tend to eat a bone or two off of the wing. Always wondered if that was ok or not.

  • A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

    asked by

    (3895)
  • Views
    15.1K
  • Last Activity
    1283D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

10 Answers

best answer

2
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on May 06, 2011
at 12:39 PM

I think this is probably ok, but I would think that most of the food value has been cooked out of them. The purpose of making bone broth is to transfer food value from the bones into a solution of water.

I will sometimes eat the knuckles off of chicken bones from roast chicken which I think is probably a good source of vitamins/minerals (and to my amusement, my picky-eating 6 year old daughter does the same), but the cooked bones themselves without any marrow may not be.

My general assumption is that it is hard to "overdose" on vitamins or minerals that you get from food, I think you would run into digestive distress first, and your body has a way of expelling any surplus (diarrhea, etc).

3
8c5533ffe71bd4262fedc7e898ead1ba

on September 30, 2011
at 07:46 AM

I used to live in NW Cameroon. One thing that amazed me is that people's teeth are incredible. They can take tops off bottles with no chipping or anything. They peel sugarcane with their teeth. And this fascinated me because they don't do dairy products. Cows are for beef.

But they eat bones. One great delicacy is to have a roasted fish, pull out the spine & bones and put it back on the fire -- "it's like potato chips" I was told. They also regularly eat beef bones and chicken bones. And they don't soften them up in a pressure cooker!

1
4218ac7cafd1519186bb8122b759d644

on December 19, 2012
at 01:01 AM

Hello I have a Vitamix blender and I blend a the bones from a whole chicken it all turns into stock which I use for gravy or stews. I don't know if I its bad doing this can smyone tell me if its fine doing this with the chicken bones ???

1
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 06, 2011
at 05:33 PM

Oxtail bones cooks down soft enough to eat, after 4-5hours in my kuhn rikon pressurecooker on hi pressure. Its not necessary to cook broth this long (2-2,5hours) is enough. Better for flavor not to cook too long, then i recook all the stuff and reduce that to 1/3rd.

1
Bd271299b2d4d9b2e3da9c252fef058c

on May 06, 2011
at 03:53 PM

I luuuuuuurrrrve bones, and pressure-cooked bones are my favorite food group. As I'm dairy-free, I assume that this is what my body craves for calcium. I've never had digestive issues with them- I figure if I can chew it enough to swallow, it's safe.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 06, 2011
at 03:10 PM

I blend softened bones in a blender to create a 'bone meal' that I use as a calcium/magnesium/phosphorous source.

1
Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

on May 06, 2011
at 01:16 PM

There's a difference between the joints/knuckles, and the actual bones. The joints and knuckles are made out of connective tissue, collagen, cartilage and the like, and they are what turn gelatinous upon long cooking. Eating the connective tissue is good for building your own connective tissue, as in helping in the repair of you own joints.

I used to have sore joints when I started lifting heavy on deadlifts. I started getting chicken wings/legs and eating all the connective tissue, and now my joints don't hurt that much anymore. n=1, I know, but I feel eating connective tissue is good.

1
7e1064164e012a1ead098098245b1cd4

(1197)

on May 06, 2011
at 12:28 PM

Purely anecdotal but when we used to have chicken legs or thighs when I was younger, I always used to eat the bones afterwards. My parents thought it was weird but gave into my demands eventually. I remember really loving the joints...!

0
C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

on September 30, 2011
at 11:03 AM

Dogs shouldn't be given cooked bones because they splinter easily and cause digestive issues. Wouldn't the same apply to humans eating the same types of bones?

306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on September 30, 2011
at 07:33 PM

You don't want to feed them bones straight from an oven-baked chicken or something, but when they've been pressure-cooked or boiled for a long time, they're very soft. You can literally crumble them between your fingers. No sharp edges at all.

0
D13db3c36e8c981d14988bd25a889de4

on September 30, 2011
at 03:49 AM

Don't worry so much! You'll stop when done.

I cook chicken bones in the crockpot for 24 hours. They are definitely soft enough to eat. Usually I feed them to the dog as a snack. My 11-yr-old daughter likes them too.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!