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bones for broth - cooked or uncooked?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 07, 2013 at 4:06 AM

I have been wanting to prepare my bone broth for quite sometime. BUT I am a newbie in cooking and not getting a clear idea from the internet.

Can I use the bones from already cooked meat? Cooking the broth for hours takes tremendous toll on my budget - gas fuel/electricity bill. Someone just suggested me to use pressure cooker to do bone broth in 30-35 minutes instead of simmering for hours. Is that good enough?

81f1d26f743c564a6a20ac5c8bdf31bc

on March 07, 2013
at 10:20 PM

YES! I like to roast the meat first always, even sometimes the cooked ones especially the bones left over from the restaurant that were rare.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on March 07, 2013
at 06:06 PM

I put the pot on the stove, dump the bones in, dump the water in, turn it on high, and set the timer for an hour. It heats up while I prep the veggies. Once the veggies are in, I lock the lid in place, and let it go. I turn it off when the timer goes off and let it release the pressure on the stove. If you have an electric range, you'll need to remove it from the heating element to cool. A gas range stops cooking as soon as you turn the flame off.

0c8f3010ebaee7d5e9338e49824753af

(150)

on March 07, 2013
at 06:34 AM

Ever considered using bones from cooked fish?

0c8f3010ebaee7d5e9338e49824753af

(150)

on March 07, 2013
at 06:33 AM

Didn get... do you always pressure cook your broth but for more time (how much)?

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5 Answers

1
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on March 07, 2013
at 08:00 AM

I always use cooked bones. If it is the bones from a cooked chicken, then the bones and skin etc are placed in my pressure cooker, with the juice of a lemon, a couple of bay leaves (the aroma while it is cooking is gorgeous!) and a few black pepper corns. Enough water to cover by half an inch and I pressure cook for about 40 minutes. This makes a delicious chicken stock.

Beef bones - if they are from a joint, then the method above works well. If raw, then I roast them for about 30 minutes first to get them nicely brown. If they will fit in my pressure cooker then the method above works beautifully, though I cook them for an hour. If they are big, then I cook them in a slow cooker for about 18 hours (I find that the gelling quality can diminish if cooked for a long long time).

The stock keeps well in the fridge for a few days or months in the freezer. Excellent heated and seasoned as a beverage, or as the basis for soups, casseroles, stews etc. I tend to freeze in mug sized quantities so I have the exact amount for a drink, or two or three portions will make enough soup for two people etc etc.

0
D9e4b265ef308c8cabf847559fd8be2e

on March 07, 2013
at 02:43 PM

From a purely nutritional point of view, raw bones are better. But, from a culinary perspective (flavor, color, clarity...) roasted bones are preferred.

For energy efficiency: pressure cooker. For culinary art (consommé, demi-glace): stove-top.

Since you are new to cooking, you're probably not attempting a consommé.

It is fine to use cooked or roasted bones in your broth (technically "stock") but the end result might not be quite as nutritionally rich as starting w/ raw bones. Here's why:

When you roast a chicken, for example, you are also starting to render the cartilage and extract the things you want in your stock. This ends up in the bottom of the roasting pan. You want that stuff in the stock! (With raw bones everything stays contained in the stockpot).

The solution, simply, is to save the pan juices by "deglazing" : add a little water to the roasting pan, bring to a boil, stir and save. This will also add flavor and color to the stock.

Fish bones cook very quickly. Use raw fish bones, fins and skin, shrimp shells, etc... for fish stock.

0
4610451431ec7155c87a5698be682a95

(1122)

on March 07, 2013
at 01:56 PM

started my first batch last night. roasted beef bones for an hour (it was all i could do to stop myself from eating all the marrow right there). threw into crock pot with onions and apple cider vinegar. i'm letting cook for 24 hrs. good luck on your first attempt.

0
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on March 07, 2013
at 04:53 AM

i've done both. i prefer using already cooked bones better than raw bones. the flavor is way too gamey for me the raw way.

81f1d26f743c564a6a20ac5c8bdf31bc

on March 07, 2013
at 10:20 PM

YES! I like to roast the meat first always, even sometimes the cooked ones especially the bones left over from the restaurant that were rare.

0c8f3010ebaee7d5e9338e49824753af

(150)

on March 07, 2013
at 06:34 AM

Ever considered using bones from cooked fish?

0
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on March 07, 2013
at 04:19 AM

I've made it with both cooked and raw, sometimes together. Unless I am using and old hen, my chicken broth usually comes from the carcass of a roasted chicken (2 or more saved in the freezer over a few weeks). Beef bones are usually raw, unless I decided to roast them first. I rarely buy bone-in cuts of beef. When I do happen to, I will add those cooked bones to the raw ones I use in the next batch.

I use a pressure cooker to make broth in an hour from start to fiish. It didn't gel as much when I cooked it for less time.

0c8f3010ebaee7d5e9338e49824753af

(150)

on March 07, 2013
at 06:33 AM

Didn get... do you always pressure cook your broth but for more time (how much)?

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on March 07, 2013
at 06:06 PM

I put the pot on the stove, dump the bones in, dump the water in, turn it on high, and set the timer for an hour. It heats up while I prep the veggies. Once the veggies are in, I lock the lid in place, and let it go. I turn it off when the timer goes off and let it release the pressure on the stove. If you have an electric range, you'll need to remove it from the heating element to cool. A gas range stops cooking as soon as you turn the flame off.

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