2

votes

Bone broth with bones from conventional meat - should I do it?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 27, 2012 at 2:38 AM

Most of the time I buy grass-fed meat, but this Christmas we grilled an amazing prime standing rib roast, that i believe was conventionally raised. It seems a shame to toss the bones without making broth...but I wonder about the drawbacks. I know a lot of the synthetic hormones, etc. end up in the fat, but what about the bones?? Would you do it? Thanks!

Fce356005a83353009c11567c217a9bd

on April 07, 2013
at 06:03 AM

And while you're at it, add carrots and celery with your onions to the pot, the Mirepoix. No need to dice, just throw them in the pot.

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 27, 2012
at 09:52 PM

Cows are made of what they eat. Just like everything else. Hormones to increase 'feed efficiency'? No thank you. Antibiotics that result in superbug propagation? No thank you. Mind you, I'm not disagreeing about the bones or organs so much. But I think we'd all be better off eschewing fatty cuts of industrially farmed beef.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 27, 2012
at 03:56 PM

The whole "don't eat the fat" thing is so unproven!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 27, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Cows aren't made of grass, corn or soy. They are made of beef. There's really minor differences in fat composition and quality between conventional and "optimal" (I won't even call that grass-fed, not sure that's necessarily best.)

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on December 27, 2012
at 02:45 PM

Mmmm...beef jellllooooo. :-)

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on December 27, 2012
at 02:44 PM

I wouldn't go quite *that* far, Matt, but in terms of making stock, I'm with ya. The benefits are worth it, wherever the bones come from.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on December 27, 2012
at 02:43 PM

Just for nice color, you can also add some onion skins to the pot while it cooks. (Or pretty much just chop up some onions into big chunks *without peeling* and toss 'em in.) But yeah, mostly good flavor and rich color come from adding some roasted "meaty bones" along with the purely "boney bones."

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 27, 2012
at 12:27 PM

Excellent point.

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 27, 2012
at 12:01 PM

Bullshit entirely. Corn, grain, ^soy^, hormones, antibiotics... not saying all this transfers through bone broth. I believe it that removing the fat will help a lot. I've also been led to believe that organ meats are minimally detrimental if at all, due to lack of fatty tissue. Grain fed = go lean.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on December 27, 2012
at 05:21 AM

Bullshit. Conventionally raised are fed large amounts of soy, something I am trying to avoid.

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on December 27, 2012
at 04:56 AM

The chef's term for this is making a "brown" stock. Without roasting the bones, you make a "white" stock.

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7 Answers

5
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on December 27, 2012
at 04:23 AM

I am of the mind that bone broth from conventionally raised animals is better than no bone broth at all. I allow the broth to sit in the fridge over night and discard the hardened layer of fat off the top before consuming any of the broth. I have not found a local source for grass fed bones and refuse to pay for shipping from a mail-order source. I save any bones from grass-fed meat I get, but it can take a few months to get enough to make a decent pot of broth. We go through quite a bit of broth each week, so conventionally raised bones it is.

3
Fce356005a83353009c11567c217a9bd

on December 27, 2012
at 12:20 PM

+1 for making the broth, skimming the fat, enjoying the broth. You ate the meat, right?

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 27, 2012
at 12:27 PM

Excellent point.

3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 27, 2012
at 05:01 AM

Darn it people, the benefits always outweigh the drawbacks! There's hardly any drawbacks to conventional meat.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 27, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Cows aren't made of grass, corn or soy. They are made of beef. There's really minor differences in fat composition and quality between conventional and "optimal" (I won't even call that grass-fed, not sure that's necessarily best.)

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on December 27, 2012
at 02:44 PM

I wouldn't go quite *that* far, Matt, but in terms of making stock, I'm with ya. The benefits are worth it, wherever the bones come from.

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 27, 2012
at 09:52 PM

Cows are made of what they eat. Just like everything else. Hormones to increase 'feed efficiency'? No thank you. Antibiotics that result in superbug propagation? No thank you. Mind you, I'm not disagreeing about the bones or organs so much. But I think we'd all be better off eschewing fatty cuts of industrially farmed beef.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on December 27, 2012
at 05:21 AM

Bullshit. Conventionally raised are fed large amounts of soy, something I am trying to avoid.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 27, 2012
at 03:56 PM

The whole "don't eat the fat" thing is so unproven!

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on December 27, 2012
at 12:01 PM

Bullshit entirely. Corn, grain, ^soy^, hormones, antibiotics... not saying all this transfers through bone broth. I believe it that removing the fat will help a lot. I've also been led to believe that organ meats are minimally detrimental if at all, due to lack of fatty tissue. Grain fed = go lean.

1
956bcad1d462d433a4e1e22f6e3355d5

(1191)

on December 27, 2012
at 12:16 PM

Hell yes, it can stil be a lifesaver (at least it is for me). Skim off the fat if it worries you.

bone-broth-with-bones-from-conventional-meat---should-i-do-it?

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on December 27, 2012
at 02:45 PM

Mmmm...beef jellllooooo. :-)

1
00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on December 27, 2012
at 03:19 AM

Due to the price of bones from grass-fed animals, I compromise. I buy beef bones from a conventional butcher and a grass-fed-animal butcher. I mix 'em together and hope for the best.

0
A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on December 27, 2012
at 07:43 PM

I don't think that having conventionally raised broth once will kill you I say go ahead

0
2fd566cefde2de38e75e1bc13a966e16

on December 27, 2012
at 04:07 AM

Absolutely! A few ways you could could mitigate potential problems include using beef bones as opposed to chicken or pork (less omega-6), and skimming off the fat from the broth (this may be easiest if you let it cool first so that it forms a solid layer on the top). You could also roast the bones first in a 400-425 degree oven for 15-30 minutes and then drain the fat. Many also say making stock this way leads to a more flavorful product as well.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on December 27, 2012
at 02:43 PM

Just for nice color, you can also add some onion skins to the pot while it cooks. (Or pretty much just chop up some onions into big chunks *without peeling* and toss 'em in.) But yeah, mostly good flavor and rich color come from adding some roasted "meaty bones" along with the purely "boney bones."

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on December 27, 2012
at 04:56 AM

The chef's term for this is making a "brown" stock. Without roasting the bones, you make a "white" stock.

Fce356005a83353009c11567c217a9bd

on April 07, 2013
at 06:03 AM

And while you're at it, add carrots and celery with your onions to the pot, the Mirepoix. No need to dice, just throw them in the pot.

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