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Bone Broth Help!

Answered on July 21, 2013
Created July 20, 2013 at 1:11 PM

I am making a gelatin broth out of fish heads.

Two questions:

1) Is it harmful to cook it for 3 hours, stick it in the fridge overnight, and then resume cooking it the following day?

2) I accidentally got the pot boiling really hard. After that incident, the liquid was a more murky brown instead of the clear tan it was before. It also smells different. Is this bad? This happened once before with a beef bone broth I made and it did not gel one bit.

EDIT: Operation Fish Head Broth a surprising success! The heads totally broke down and the bones and cartilage are totally softened and it's all a nice thick stew with the carrots/onions/celery/parsley.

Also, whatever algorithm is making these random hyperlinks in my posts is really stupid.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on July 21, 2013
at 11:53 AM

Recently boiled bones long enough so that they were edible and then roasted them before eating. Crisp stuff some of it actually- I would recommend it (for taste and maybe calcium)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on July 21, 2013
at 11:51 AM

I am all for sharing expereinces.. anyway, It might be bad, I don't know for sure to be honest, but I'm not concerned (speaking as someone who cooks stock at a rolling boil quite often). Yes, fat will oxidise when cooked for a long time or at high heat and certainly will when cooked both at high heat for a long time. With beef bones though I think the amount is fairly negligible and regardless when I make it a fair amount still rises to the top after its been cooled anyway. I don't usually reuse this though, but can't complain about flavour or consistency of the broth..!

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on July 20, 2013
at 04:53 PM

Thank you. So the browning isn't a bad thing? The broth isn't ruined by bringing it to a very hard boil for a few minutes?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on July 20, 2013
at 02:51 PM

Yeah, of course you want to cook beef bones for a long time, I was talking about fish broth as per the main parts of the question. Anyway, I think the water turns murky when making 'brown stock' because the fat from the bones is emulsified into the water. Sometime I've had stocks not gel but that is generally in a second or third batch lots of water goes in with the same bones... I don't of any other way things the stock wouldn't gel otherwise...

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on July 20, 2013
at 01:31 PM

The beef bones had generous amounts of cartilage on them. I'm asking about boiling *temperature*, not duration. I want to cook it that long to extract more minerals and collagen and amino acids into the broth, of course.

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1 Answers

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Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on July 20, 2013
at 01:16 PM

Gelling requires gelatin - the beef bones you had may not have had any connective tissue on them hence nothing to dissolve into he broth. That's no 2) :)

No.1): I think it would probably be harmful. Everything I have read suggests the pufas will become oxidised with long boiling times. I once boiled salmon heads for two and a half hours as opposed to my usual one and it tasted nasty. Why do you want to cook it for as long as you do anyway? From what I've seen 1 hour yields a respectively gelatinous stock...

[edit- sounds good re fish broth. What type did you use and for how long? When did you add the carrots etc in the process? ]

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on July 21, 2013
at 11:53 AM

Recently boiled bones long enough so that they were edible and then roasted them before eating. Crisp stuff some of it actually- I would recommend it (for taste and maybe calcium)

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on July 20, 2013
at 01:31 PM

The beef bones had generous amounts of cartilage on them. I'm asking about boiling *temperature*, not duration. I want to cook it that long to extract more minerals and collagen and amino acids into the broth, of course.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on July 20, 2013
at 04:53 PM

Thank you. So the browning isn't a bad thing? The broth isn't ruined by bringing it to a very hard boil for a few minutes?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on July 21, 2013
at 11:51 AM

I am all for sharing expereinces.. anyway, It might be bad, I don't know for sure to be honest, but I'm not concerned (speaking as someone who cooks stock at a rolling boil quite often). Yes, fat will oxidise when cooked for a long time or at high heat and certainly will when cooked both at high heat for a long time. With beef bones though I think the amount is fairly negligible and regardless when I make it a fair amount still rises to the top after its been cooled anyway. I don't usually reuse this though, but can't complain about flavour or consistency of the broth..!

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on July 20, 2013
at 02:51 PM

Yeah, of course you want to cook beef bones for a long time, I was talking about fish broth as per the main parts of the question. Anyway, I think the water turns murky when making 'brown stock' because the fat from the bones is emulsified into the water. Sometime I've had stocks not gel but that is generally in a second or third batch lots of water goes in with the same bones... I don't of any other way things the stock wouldn't gel otherwise...

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