3

votes

Bone Broth: Does canning ruin the gelatin?

Answered on June 25, 2016
Created November 06, 2012 at 12:28 AM

I just scored a large quantity of very good quality, local, pastured bones (pork and beef), so I am about to embark upon a very large broth-making session---since I have limited room in my freezer, I am thinking about canning the broth (in glass Mason jars.) To do this, all sources advise pressure canning.

I'm pretty sure the minerals will survive intact, but I'm wondering about the gelatin + glutamine + glucosamine etc. Would the high heat damage or denature these, making it worthless, or will the canned broth still be worth making?

PS: I live off-the-grid, so I am generally interested in off-grid solutions. What would Grok do if he got lotsa bones?

Medium avatar

(20)

on April 27, 2014
at 11:33 PM

@Jude what temperature do pressure cook at and what type bones do you use?

Medium avatar

on October 24, 2013
at 10:40 PM

That is because during the initial boiling of the stock, collagen is being converted to gelatin. When the bones are removed, there is no source of collagen. This is when the degradation of gelatin begins. Unless you pressure can your stock with added collagen, you will lose gel strength to some degree.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 24, 2013
at 10:25 PM

Folks boil (212+F) bone broths for hours approaching entire day. They 'gel' just fine.

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on September 05, 2013
at 08:21 PM

Wow! The food renegade write-up is the best research I've seen on pressure cookers and nutrition. I think you're right Aughra! Although I have huge respect for WAPF, they may be just a stodgy ole luddite on this subject. I'm going to continue to use my pressure cooker. The jury is still out though, on whether pressure cooking damages gelatin. I'm going to write to food renegade, and see what they think about it.

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on September 05, 2013
at 06:08 PM

Thanks Jude. You're probably right, as I 've noticed the same thing. I canned a few batches, and the broth isn't gelatinous anymore in the jar. But I wonder if it would be if, say, I cooked with it, and then put the leftovers back in the fridge. Have you done this? Perhaps the "loss" of gelatin comes because of the vaccumm? Maybe gelatin "comes back" once you take it out of the jar? Do you have any experience with this?

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on December 07, 2012
at 01:58 PM

I tried this metod a couple months ago. I did not find the cubes to be shelf stable. They started to melt when left on the counter. Maybe my room temp is hotter than average (Georgia is pretty warm compared to places further north). I took it a step further and put my reduced, syrupy broth onto a greased dehydrator sheet. I left it in there till it turned to glass. Then I powdered it in a spice grinder. It worked really well. It was a lot of work. I did it with only a small portion since I was testing it out. It would probably be great for a big batch though.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on December 06, 2012
at 10:03 PM

Food renegade did a great writeup on how pressure cooking actually preserves more of the nutrients. I think the WAPF may have been wrong about this one. http://www.foodrenegade.com/pressure-cooking-healthy/

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on December 06, 2012
at 10:02 PM

See "sweet sue chicken in a can". http://www.momlogic.com/2009/05/chicken_in_a_can.php

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on December 06, 2012
at 09:40 PM

There are two kinds of canning: pressure canning and water bath (ie, boiling) canning. For foods that are low acid, like broth, it's generally considered unsafe to use water bath canning. Mmmm. Botulism.

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:28 AM

Thanks, Devon, for the warning about high temperatures without the usual telltale signs. I'll be on the lookout!

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:26 AM

I am aware that freezing does not seem to affect the gelatin. The problem is that I have very limited freezer space, and I live off the electric grid. I am wondering specifically about CANNING--which, in the case of broth, means PRESSURE CANNING -- it subjects the broth to temperatures much higher than boiling--up to 240 degrees F and beyond. I'm a bit worried about such high temps.

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:22 AM

Well, not exactly, Matt. Cooking under pressure makes the temperature rise far past the "natural" boiling point: it goes from 212 up to 240 degrees and higher. Many people don't use pressure cookers for this reason, feeling that proteins and other elements are denatured. (I haven't seen any scientific studies done on this however. Has anyone else?) The benefits of pressure cooking are that the shortened cooking time saves fuel, and the pressure really forces juices and flavors to mingle. Though some people feel they aren't worth the risks...

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:16 AM

Thanks, Luckie. The homemade bouillon post at Nourished Kitchen is pure genius. I am in love already with that technique -- perfect for simple, off-grid cabin life. My family thanks you in advance!

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8 Answers

2
61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on November 06, 2012
at 12:46 AM

I don't know about whether or not canning would harm the gelatin.

But here's an off-the-grid, pretty Grok-friendly solution: http://nourishedkitchen.com/homemade-bouillon-portable-soup/

Basically, making your own gelatinous bouillon cubes. If you have good knuckle bones with a lot of gelatin of their own, you won't need to add any powdered. The cubes last up to six months at room temperature if stored airtight.

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:16 AM

Thanks, Luckie. The homemade bouillon post at Nourished Kitchen is pure genius. I am in love already with that technique -- perfect for simple, off-grid cabin life. My family thanks you in advance!

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on December 07, 2012
at 01:58 PM

I tried this metod a couple months ago. I did not find the cubes to be shelf stable. They started to melt when left on the counter. Maybe my room temp is hotter than average (Georgia is pretty warm compared to places further north). I took it a step further and put my reduced, syrupy broth onto a greased dehydrator sheet. I left it in there till it turned to glass. Then I powdered it in a spice grinder. It worked really well. It was a lot of work. I did it with only a small portion since I was testing it out. It would probably be great for a big batch though.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 06, 2012
at 01:37 AM

You already boil bone broth, that's all canning is.

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:22 AM

Well, not exactly, Matt. Cooking under pressure makes the temperature rise far past the "natural" boiling point: it goes from 212 up to 240 degrees and higher. Many people don't use pressure cookers for this reason, feeling that proteins and other elements are denatured. (I haven't seen any scientific studies done on this however. Has anyone else?) The benefits of pressure cooking are that the shortened cooking time saves fuel, and the pressure really forces juices and flavors to mingle. Though some people feel they aren't worth the risks...

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on December 06, 2012
at 10:03 PM

Food renegade did a great writeup on how pressure cooking actually preserves more of the nutrients. I think the WAPF may have been wrong about this one. http://www.foodrenegade.com/pressure-cooking-healthy/

C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

(3225)

on December 06, 2012
at 09:40 PM

There are two kinds of canning: pressure canning and water bath (ie, boiling) canning. For foods that are low acid, like broth, it's generally considered unsafe to use water bath canning. Mmmm. Botulism.

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on September 05, 2013
at 08:21 PM

Wow! The food renegade write-up is the best research I've seen on pressure cookers and nutrition. I think you're right Aughra! Although I have huge respect for WAPF, they may be just a stodgy ole luddite on this subject. I'm going to continue to use my pressure cooker. The jury is still out though, on whether pressure cooking damages gelatin. I'm going to write to food renegade, and see what they think about it.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on April 28, 2014
at 03:07 PM

We used to buy canned gefilte fish (it's an Eastern European Jewish thing) when I was a kid. It's packed in a very thick jelled broth. The commercial canning does nothing to affect the gel, I don't know if home canning would be any different.

0
Medium avatar

on October 24, 2013
at 10:05 PM

I've observed that refrigerating the pressure canned stock after opening the jar does not affect the gelling properties. The gel strength of gelatin degrades slowly when held at temperatures above 104 degrees Fahrenheit. The higher the temperature, the faster the degradation. At 240+ degrees (the temperatures achieved during pressure canning) the gel strength will degrade from 100% to 0% in about 90 minutes. You can expect that a bone broth will have slightly less of a gel strength than a 4-hour stock and you should also expect that any pressure canned stock will have no gel strength.

Cheers!

http://www.gelatin-gmia.com/images/GMIA_Gelatin_Manual_2012.pdf

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 24, 2013
at 10:25 PM

Folks boil (212+F) bone broths for hours approaching entire day. They 'gel' just fine.

Medium avatar

on October 24, 2013
at 10:40 PM

That is because during the initial boiling of the stock, collagen is being converted to gelatin. When the bones are removed, there is no source of collagen. This is when the degradation of gelatin begins. Unless you pressure can your stock with added collagen, you will lose gel strength to some degree.

0
F2418d47ed46a05ba7850669dc51e742

on August 23, 2013
at 03:56 AM

I pressure cook all bones, chicken, turkey, beef into stocks in the pressure cooker. But I'm also said to be insane, I cook poultry bones for 6 hours and beef bones for 8 hours in my electric pressure cooker and the beef bones no matter how large crumble in my fingers. I've cooked them for less time with less results and longer with no better results so 6 and 8 hours are my staple. This stock is a main staple in all my cooking, whether I'm cooking rice, pasta or vegtables(sp?) I rarely cook with water. I eliminated my freezer and converted it to a chest refrigerator and it keeps all my food at a glorious 34 degrees at almost no electricity. Anyways back to the stock, because of my limited refer space, I decided to pressure can the stock, both poultry and beef. Both stocks have lost all gelatinous properties, just like all the store bought varieties that I no longer buy because they have no gelatinous properties. I thought they were just so watered down that they didn't have enough original stock properties left. I have searched high and low for the scientific answer to why the canned stock lost it's gelatinous(ness). All my canned stock is watery, deeply colored and delicious but no gelatin. I also wonder if I've lost healthy properties because my uncanned stock is so much more filling and rich in every meal than my canned stock. Anybody know the science behind this conumdrum?????

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on September 05, 2013
at 06:08 PM

Thanks Jude. You're probably right, as I 've noticed the same thing. I canned a few batches, and the broth isn't gelatinous anymore in the jar. But I wonder if it would be if, say, I cooked with it, and then put the leftovers back in the fridge. Have you done this? Perhaps the "loss" of gelatin comes because of the vaccumm? Maybe gelatin "comes back" once you take it out of the jar? Do you have any experience with this?

Medium avatar

(20)

on April 27, 2014
at 11:33 PM

@Jude what temperature do pressure cook at and what type bones do you use?

0
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on December 06, 2012
at 09:59 PM

Pressure cooking creates a beautiful gelatinous broth also those weird giant cans of whole chickens seem to be full of gelatin. I think you're safe.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on December 06, 2012
at 10:02 PM

See "sweet sue chicken in a can". http://www.momlogic.com/2009/05/chicken_in_a_can.php

0
6c1711874447b22aae9530d46cfa91b5

on December 06, 2012
at 09:35 PM

I read that if you get it too hot it will create MSG. I read it here

0
82d323bf0d853b0564e9781dd97c1b4d

(126)

on November 06, 2012
at 01:44 AM

We make our own broth and I laugh every time I try to pour it out because it is so gelatinous. I didn't expect it the first time. We boil the bones, strain the liquid into mason jars and actually we freeze ours in some plastic mason jars. The glass ones we keep in the fridge and use within the month. We also pour some into ice-cube trays and put the cubes in plastic bags. Never had any complaints from any of it, except when my husband heats it in a mug without watering it down first. That stuff can reach insane temperatures without any sign and I've burned my tongue many times. I always water it down before drinking it. I'm not sure about the glutamine or glucosamine, but I would imagine if the gelatin is still intact, so is the rest?

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:26 AM

I am aware that freezing does not seem to affect the gelatin. The problem is that I have very limited freezer space, and I live off the electric grid. I am wondering specifically about CANNING--which, in the case of broth, means PRESSURE CANNING -- it subjects the broth to temperatures much higher than boiling--up to 240 degrees F and beyond. I'm a bit worried about such high temps.

F79dd33c17d9fbb55cc7e202dfa30e6e

(300)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:28 AM

Thanks, Devon, for the warning about high temperatures without the usual telltale signs. I'll be on the lookout!

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