11

votes

Bone Broth Battle: Chicken Vs. Beef...FIGHT!

Commented on January 29, 2015
Created November 28, 2011 at 5:44 PM

Which do you prefer, and why?

Which is more healthful, and why?

What is your preferred method/recipe/source?

On a side note, I usualy make chicken stock after I roast a whole chicken with my girlfriend, about once or twice a month. I always add the organs and the neck along with all the bones and the carcass. This time I added a half a Spanish onion and about 6 cloves of garlic, crushed. Turned out really rich and dark. I also usually add gelatin to my chicken stocks.

I want to get more bone broth in my life, but I worry about the PUFAs from the chicken. I've decided to start buying soup bones from my local farmer, and try also to add some collagen from cartilage or knuckle bones, ox-tails, etc...the only problem being, that my girlfriend doesn't like the taste of beef broth. She says it tastes like McDonald's in a bowl. I agree, that it reminds me of the old-style McD's fries, but I LOVE it!

EDIT: Recently tried this:

Perpetual Soup - NourishedKitchen

It turned out well, but the end product was a bit dark as my slow-cooker tends to overheat things. I tested the temp. in the middle of the week (I had it going for 6 days) and it was at 190-200 degrees, which is way too high. I'm planning on hacking together a dimmer pot for the slow-cooker to lower the ouput and keep it hovering at 160.

Medium avatar

(0)

on October 29, 2013
at 07:26 PM

mmm chicken.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on October 20, 2013
at 07:05 AM

Sounds like you had too much water with the chicken carcass. I usually put two carcasses into the pressure cooker and just cover with water. After 40 minutes cooking at pressure, it sets really well.

Medium avatar

(238)

on October 20, 2013
at 06:53 AM

http://auberins.com/ is my go to place for anything temperature controlled. I used his stuff on beer brewing equipment, refrigeration and other projects. You could also hit up Harbor Freight for a variable speed controller and try it the manual method without temp probes.

Medium avatar

(20)

on October 20, 2013
at 04:14 AM

my crock pot is around 205 degrees on the low setting when I make stock

...have you found a dimmer that can regulate the temperature???

319cdfcd8ec0467f34a3c5aeb2a5e045

(296)

on January 24, 2012
at 06:10 AM

I was thinking the same thing- Manhattan clam chowder, the tomato based one.

0c875e97044bf838a074470caa5d630d

on January 24, 2012
at 12:22 AM

The "trinity" is onion, celery and pepper. Celery, onion and carrot is mirepoix. I usually do a combo with garlic.

D291fa0ee09423d56db58cd6fded1b85

(88)

on January 23, 2012
at 02:26 PM

I make an icelandic soup (langostines and cream) and a Bermudian Fish Chowder with my fish stocks. I use my shrimp stocks to make N.E. Clam Chowder.

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on January 11, 2012
at 03:03 AM

If you can get your hands on some chicken feet you won't need to bother with gelatin. Cook them down and they make the broth so gelatinous it'll stand up like jello in the fridge. Yummy!

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on December 29, 2011
at 11:30 PM

Are you sure you are not throwing out nutrients with "blood & scum"?

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on December 06, 2011
at 04:43 AM

I won't rest until everyone in the world has tried your Pho, Angelo. You think I'm joking... ;)

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on December 06, 2011
at 02:47 AM

I love how much you like this recipe almost as much as I love the pho. So glad we posted it.

Medium avatar

on November 29, 2011
at 08:51 PM

Most likely. It's a good idea to crack the bones in half (or thirds) to expose the bone marrow. Unless you prefer to eat the bone marrow separately, in which case it doesn't matter.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 29, 2011
at 06:55 PM

Does cracking the bones make a difference in the final product?

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on November 29, 2011
at 02:38 PM

Andrew, I'm going to have to try that!

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on November 29, 2011
at 09:39 AM

Best stock I have ever made was from chicken feet. So good!

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on November 29, 2011
at 08:35 AM

If you wash, dry and then put the eggshells through a small processor until it is a powder, it just dissolves away. (I add the juice of a lemon to the water which makes it nice and acidic to melt the shells / soften the bones a bit)

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on November 29, 2011
at 08:33 AM

I add lemon juice to my chicken broth while it is cooking in the slow cooker. After 8 our so hours, the bones are so soft that they can be crushed with a heavy wooden spoon, allowing LOADS of marrow etc into the soup. If you can get hold of chicken feet, they are a fabulous addition to the crock pot.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 29, 2011
at 07:46 AM

I included a recipe section of the question too!

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on November 28, 2011
at 11:22 PM

:) I just made a batch of chicken broth with a bag of feet from our CSA. I keep having these weird flashes of Baba Yaga in my mind. Heh. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baba_Yaga (That, in a weird convoluted way of course. I studied Russian in college so I have all sorts of creepy stories in my head.)

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on November 28, 2011
at 10:05 PM

my kids always make snide remarks about my broth. i tell them i am trying to get them to move out :)

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on November 28, 2011
at 10:02 PM

they are not pastured turkeys :(

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 28, 2011
at 08:56 PM

Love me some pork broth!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 28, 2011
at 08:24 PM

That's a great question. For some reason, I taste a bitter under-taste with pork broth from bones so it's never become a favorite of mine.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 28, 2011
at 08:22 PM

Me too, Adam! My "eternal" stew has beef, turkey and goose bones/broth with onions, celery and whatever new meat & veggies I add when I reheat it. Some bones go into the broth pot raw for marrow, etc., and others are rescued from cooked carcasses. So good you really don't need spices and my joints have never felt so good.

244e1f82efb3fd15d2da39397488fb24

(549)

on November 28, 2011
at 07:06 PM

Yeah, I actually thought I deleted my last comment already. I just did. I sometimes post when I'm excited and then delete because it's just too dumb.

244e1f82efb3fd15d2da39397488fb24

(549)

on November 28, 2011
at 07:04 PM

lol, that was hilarious! And also true. But hilarious!! :D

Ba20b502cf02b5513ea8c4bb2740d8cb

(1669)

on November 28, 2011
at 07:03 PM

haha..."stirring the pot" pun intended... I would be more interested in people's best bone broth recipes!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:37 PM

The eggshells seem to thin out and get crumbly, @Futureboy. I think they would dissolve if I went much heavier on the vinegar.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:35 PM

very nice, do the egg shells dissolve?

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:31 PM

Where do you get turkey necks?

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:06 PM

People are gonna give you heck about this, so here's a tip. If you want to add more info, or say something more, you should edit your original answer instead of adding another answer. I would delete this one, and edit the original to say what you want it to say.

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27 Answers

10
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on November 28, 2011
at 06:33 PM

Peace and Broth reign at my house.

I don't separate the bones and cartilage of chicken, beef, pork. It all goes in the pot with water and (some) vinegar.

With a handful of eggshells for more minerals!

Yes, it tastes different every time,

A DIFFERENT KIND OF WONDERFUL!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on November 29, 2011
at 02:38 PM

Andrew, I'm going to have to try that!

B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

(10778)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:37 PM

The eggshells seem to thin out and get crumbly, @Futureboy. I think they would dissolve if I went much heavier on the vinegar.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on November 29, 2011
at 08:35 AM

If you wash, dry and then put the eggshells through a small processor until it is a powder, it just dissolves away. (I add the juice of a lemon to the water which makes it nice and acidic to melt the shells / soften the bones a bit)

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:35 PM

very nice, do the egg shells dissolve?

244e1f82efb3fd15d2da39397488fb24

(549)

on November 28, 2011
at 07:04 PM

lol, that was hilarious! And also true. But hilarious!! :D

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 28, 2011
at 08:22 PM

Me too, Adam! My "eternal" stew has beef, turkey and goose bones/broth with onions, celery and whatever new meat & veggies I add when I reheat it. Some bones go into the broth pot raw for marrow, etc., and others are rescued from cooked carcasses. So good you really don't need spices and my joints have never felt so good.

6
Medium avatar

on November 28, 2011
at 06:14 PM

Anecdotally and per the GAPS diet, chicken broth seems to be easier to digest if your gut is compromised (IBS, GERD, etc). However, chicken broth undoubtedly has an inferior O3/6 ratio. The bones are also smaller and weaker, so you'd be getting less marrow/minerals/connective tissue.

In summary: eat chicken broth to heal your gut (if needed). Favor beef broth otherwise.

In terms of preparation, I don't think the crockpot can be beaten for both quality and ease of use. Cooking time seems to be the most important factor for a good bone broth- I like to go 7 hours minimum up to 21 hours on the low setting.

Paul Jaminet also has some good stuff on bone broths:

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=1704
http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=4775

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on November 29, 2011
at 08:33 AM

I add lemon juice to my chicken broth while it is cooking in the slow cooker. After 8 our so hours, the bones are so soft that they can be crushed with a heavy wooden spoon, allowing LOADS of marrow etc into the soup. If you can get hold of chicken feet, they are a fabulous addition to the crock pot.

Medium avatar

on November 29, 2011
at 08:51 PM

Most likely. It's a good idea to crack the bones in half (or thirds) to expose the bone marrow. Unless you prefer to eat the bone marrow separately, in which case it doesn't matter.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 29, 2011
at 06:55 PM

Does cracking the bones make a difference in the final product?

4
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 28, 2011
at 08:26 PM

I have one new element to add in addition to the comments I've made about other answers.

On Thanksgiving weekend, I reheated a beef/turkey stew. Once it reached a nice simmer, I dropped in a portion of shrimp-in-shell. I also put in some butter to melt.

I must say, the shrimp added wonderful flavor to the overall stew and the shrimp were the best I've ever made at home. The shrimp tasted of both the butter and the stew yet the shrimp flavor came through just fine. The next day, the remaining stew had an enhanced flavor including shrimp with all the other flavors.

I will do that again!

3
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on November 28, 2011
at 08:23 PM

I prefer the taste of beef broth (and it's probably healthier), but chicken broth smells a hell of a lot better cooking. I also love lamb broth and turkey broth. I make broth with whatever bones I have on hand.

Also, I love adding a head of garlic into the pot when I make any types of broth.

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on November 28, 2011
at 10:05 PM

my kids always make snide remarks about my broth. i tell them i am trying to get them to move out :)

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on November 28, 2011
at 11:22 PM

:) I just made a batch of chicken broth with a bag of feet from our CSA. I keep having these weird flashes of Baba Yaga in my mind. Heh. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baba_Yaga (That, in a weird convoluted way of course. I studied Russian in college so I have all sorts of creepy stories in my head.)

3
F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:59 PM

Don't forget lamb bones, if you can get them.

I agree that turkey broth is really tasty. I just made broth with the Thanksgiving carcass, including the neck and organs. SO rich and delicious, thoroughly gelatinous with all the good stuff.

That being said, I really like beef bone broth. Try adding a bunch of different herbs or lots of garlic so you're not getting the straight-forward beefiness issue. I highly recommend Latest in Paleo's Pho recipe: http://www.latestinpaleo.com/blog/2011/3/22/latest-in-paleo-pho-recipe-vietnamese-beef-soup.html

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on December 06, 2011
at 04:43 AM

I won't rest until everyone in the world has tried your Pho, Angelo. You think I'm joking... ;)

B294438548c32ed878905baf6cd1b332

on December 06, 2011
at 02:47 AM

I love how much you like this recipe almost as much as I love the pho. So glad we posted it.

3
0efba407f0ff007b270d46b6c310b50a

(40)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:07 PM

What about pork? I like them both, but beef broth always tastes more substantial to me.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 28, 2011
at 08:56 PM

Love me some pork broth!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 28, 2011
at 08:24 PM

That's a great question. For some reason, I taste a bitter under-taste with pork broth from bones so it's never become a favorite of mine.

2
C6032b723b12cf0073ec6d22c5f4e7ae

on May 18, 2013
at 02:40 AM

Oxtails are the best... they seem to add tons of gelatin to the broth and the meat is delicious when it's tender. Since I like to make my broth somewhat of a meat stock as well, I often brown a couple beef shank cuts in a pan with some ghee before throwing them in with some browned oxtails, marrow bones, and/or knuckle bones. The shank cuts add some skin and bones with marrow to the broth. I find that I always get a rich, gelatinous broth that turns totally solid when it cools.

Lamb is probably my favourite in terms of flavour, so I save the bones from chops or legs to throw in with my beef stock, but I haven't made a pure lamb broth yet... I should probably get on it.

I'm also a huge fan of turkey broth, especially since a carcass yields quite a bit of meat after a couple hours of simmering. Poultry broth doesn't gel over quite as easily, so I try to add as many chicken feet as I can into the mix.

1
Medium avatar

(3024)

on October 29, 2013
at 11:43 AM

Chicken Vs. Beef? Can't we all just be friends?

:)

I think it's also a question of what you can get your hands on. I can get bones from reasonably raised chicken - not pastured, but not from regular battery chickens. I haven't found an accessible, affordable source of beef bones yet, so I usually make chicken broth.

Incidentally, my friend found bones from grassfed cattle, but they cost a fortune. I suggested that she use the same bones again and again like this lady did.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTfn_snx0ZY

She made the most of those bones.

I'm giving away a free guide to bone broth on my site, if you want to check it out. I hope it's okay to post the link.. thought it might be helpful.

http://www.paleodietbasics.net/bonus/

Happy brothing :)

1
19ff515e8ec02d95e8f2cf68c3ec1373

(1207)

on May 18, 2013
at 12:00 AM

VEAL BROTH OR YOU AREN'T A REAL COOK.

Want the health benefits? Veal bones have it. Want to knock out some amazing french bistro food and wow your friends and family that a lot of french food is paleo friendly and fantastic? Want to make everything you cook, fancy or not, plump with flavor and mouthfeel?

IT ALL COMES DOWN TO VEAL.

1
0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on January 23, 2012
at 02:11 PM

After reading this and several other posts on bone broths, I made both of these recently.

So far, the beef broth came out better. I think. It turned to jello in the fridge and was not overly "beefy" like I thought it might be. I drank half of what I made and used the other half as a base to go along with a chuck roast. Good stuff.

For the chicken broth I used a whole chicken carcass along with the skin and some bits of meat, cooked on low in the crock pot for 24 hours. For whatever reason it just didn't gel up. I don't know if I added too much water or what happened, but I drank it anyway. It looked and tasted like chicken soup, it just wasn't very gelatinous. I will try it again the next time I have chicken.

I've also had whole red snapper twice in the past two weeks and have saved the carcasses from both fish, and am thinking about attempting a fish stock. I just don't know what I could use it for yet, as the thought of drinking it straight doesn't sound as appealing to me as the others.

6e474f9c034d09a4571ee535df41fd7e

on January 29, 2015
at 01:01 PM

I have a chicken carcass in the crock right now but in addition to the carcass I added a pound of chicken feet (I know....gross, but apparently it's the part of the chicken that creates the most gelatin and is extremely nourishing for the gut. There is a local company here in San Diego that sells their broth premade and they are huge out here....they add the carcass and the feet as well.....I'm excited to see how it turns out.

Usually I just do the beef bones...the knuckels, joints, and marrow. I love that stuff. It helps in SOOOO many ways. 

D291fa0ee09423d56db58cd6fded1b85

(88)

on January 23, 2012
at 02:26 PM

I make an icelandic soup (langostines and cream) and a Bermudian Fish Chowder with my fish stocks. I use my shrimp stocks to make N.E. Clam Chowder.

319cdfcd8ec0467f34a3c5aeb2a5e045

(296)

on January 24, 2012
at 06:10 AM

I was thinking the same thing- Manhattan clam chowder, the tomato based one.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on October 20, 2013
at 07:05 AM

Sounds like you had too much water with the chicken carcass. I usually put two carcasses into the pressure cooker and just cover with water. After 40 minutes cooking at pressure, it sets really well.

1
B64b07d4b6cea9e5c3e1c272e6393a0d

(472)

on November 29, 2011
at 07:42 PM

Which ever way you choose to go, I always prefer to augment my broths with a ready supply of collagen-laden parts. For chicken broth, a frozen chicken's foot or two will make it into the pot, and for beef broth, marrow bones slices and possibly half a pig's trotter as well. One tip that I really like is to just simmer the bones for the first 5-6-however many hours, and then add the vegetables for the last hour or so, so that they don't soak up too much precious broth.

For pork broth, which I heart most of all, take a few pounds of pork bones and a trotter, and boil them for about half an hour. Once most of the blood and scum have been leached out, drain the bones, scrub off any congealing, wash the pot, put the bones back in the pot and refill with water. Bring to a simmer for 6 hours. Off to the side, fry up some garlic, ginger, and onions til almost black (I use lard for this), then strain and add to the pot. Simmer for another hour. This is basically a half step away from ramen broth. Strain and enjoy.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on December 29, 2011
at 11:30 PM

Are you sure you are not throwing out nutrients with "blood & scum"?

1
24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on November 29, 2011
at 01:06 PM

I know the beef broth is healthier because of the n3/n6, and it's way more gelatinous but I like the taste of chicken broth better. It would help if beef broth didn't stink up my house for days :(

1
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 28, 2011
at 09:54 PM

I make both and like to drink/cook with both. I make chicken broth more often because I roast a whole chicken every couple of weeks so I have the bones available more often. I just take all the bones from one whole chicken, put them in my small crockpot, cover with water, add some ACV, and cook on low for 24 hours. I strain the broth off and refill the crockpot with water one more time cooking again for 24 hours.

I save all my beef and pork bones together--but most of them are beef and when I have enough I roast up a beef knuckle and put that with all the other bones into a crockpot, cover with water, add some ACV, and cook on low for 24 hours. I strain the broth off and refill the crockpot with water 2-3 more times cooking each time for 24 hours (basically, I stop reusing the bones when the broth stops gelling).

I also make turkey broth after roasting a turkey. I do that on the stove top because I have to use my big stock pot to hold the turkey carcass. I make it the same way I make the chicken broth cooking it on the stove to on low (covered, of course).

I used to add veggies to my broth, but I've found I prefer the flavor without anything else added.

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on November 28, 2011
at 09:22 PM

It's a tie. I love both. :)

For fowl, I usually roast the thing and then after removing legs and wings, I strip the carcass of meat into a large Pyrex. The left over bones + breast cartilage go into a stock pot to be boiled down.

For beef (well, really bison) I get marrow and oxtail and sometimes tendons and boil them away.

After a few hours of simmering and several refills of water when the water goes down by 1/4, I let the thing cool for a few hours, then fish out the bones or run it through a strainer into jars for storage for later, or another pot to start a soup.

For soup, it's the usual trinity: celery, onion, carrot sauteed with some garlic, then maybe add parsnips and then the broth/stock, bay leaf or two, salt, pepper, meat, etc. Near the end, throw in some spinach, parsley or cilantro, etc. Serve with some lemon juice and maybe Tabasco.

0c875e97044bf838a074470caa5d630d

on January 24, 2012
at 12:22 AM

The "trinity" is onion, celery and pepper. Celery, onion and carrot is mirepoix. I usually do a combo with garlic.

1
B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:18 PM

i prefer the taste of turkey broth to chicken and the necks are so inexpensive.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:31 PM

Where do you get turkey necks?

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on November 28, 2011
at 10:02 PM

they are not pastured turkeys :(

0
Medium avatar

on October 29, 2013
at 07:34 PM

0
Medium avatar

on October 29, 2013
at 07:33 PM

0
Medium avatar

on October 29, 2013
at 07:25 PM

I vote chicken.

Medium avatar

(0)

on October 29, 2013
at 07:26 PM

mmm chicken.

0
Be8e882e66a1c0924b4b3f3e1ae1f851

on October 29, 2013
at 04:36 AM

Don't forget about your "Kale Bones"!

I save my kale stems in a bag in the freezer, freezing helps break them down and they add a ton of nutrients and balance to whatever bone broth I happen to be making at the time. I make veggie stocks also, but the kale bones always make it into my bone broths for whatever reason. :-)

My favorite bone broths are turkey, chicken, elk, ox, goat, beef, lamb...on occasion I'll get something more interesting. For some reason I never do pork, although I'm sure it is delicious.

I almost always split my bones to get out ever drop of goodness and do two broths from each batch of bones. It might not be necessary but it is part of my routine.

Question for other readers:

Do you pre-roast your bones or not? I’ve tried both ways and flip flop, some claim more nutrition one way others claim the other way. Thoughts?

0
34a31e6e59ee73ac7ddfd96c3e653919

on May 17, 2013
at 11:27 PM

im not sure which is the most nutritious, but i can tell you that duck stock is by far my favourite, but i guess you can say that about just about anything made with duck.

0
6766f1aa0d1af480fa2a9b0df3504df4

(0)

on May 17, 2013
at 10:43 PM

One comment I add about the smell - I cook beef and chicken broths (chicken more often due to the access to roasted-chicken carcass, as many have cited), but in any case I add some onion to the pot in the very beginning, because it makes it all smell infinitely better!!

I usually add at least a half an onion at the very beginning, or as much of the top/tail and leek scraps as I can identify. The rest of the veggies and garlic (whatever parings I've put into my freezer-bag of scraps plus the garlic that's on the counter...) goes in for the last couple of hours only. But start with bones plus a half an onion and it smells great!

Oh, also, to get a chicken stock to gel, I usually have to have two roast-chicken carcasses to one pot of stock. One carcass will make it smooth, which is fine for every-day use, but not to really gel. I figure this is because beef bones are solid (and heavy!), so for the same volume you get quite a bit more content. Roast chicken scraps, in comparison, have meat and skin and much thinner and less dense bones, so it makes for less of the collagen and minerals. Remember, the chickens have to sorta-fly somehow - it's because their bones have a large proportion of air in them when compared to mammalian bones.

0
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:39 PM

I just made a huge pot of turkey broth. I used it in the WellFed Chili recipe as the broth and water substitution. It came out insanely good.

We don't do turkey "dinners" often, instead I'll quarter and butcher the bird - taking a pair of tinsnips to the bones to expose the marrow, then bring the pot to a boil, down to a simmer for 6 hours or so. On the turkey, even tinsnips won't work so I use a tenderizing hammer to literally "crush" the middle of the long bones. Makes me feel quite "Grokish".

I also take all my leftover veggie scraps, carrot-tops, old celery, onion skins and ends - they go in the pot as well.

As far as my favorite broth, mine is oxtails with lamb neckbones simmered all day. It's a broth you can eat with a fork, and it maybe costs us $3 for two gallons of stock.

0
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:20 PM

I've never made beef broth because I never buy cuts of beef with bones. But, I do frequently make poultry stock. I keep a ziplock bag in the freezer into which I put onion skins and all poultry bones. Any long bones are cut in half with poultry shears to expose the marrow. When the bag is full, I add carrots, celery, and bay leaf and make stock. I used to do it the long and slow method, but I recently switched to the pressure cooker method after reading a URL that found better stock could be made that way.

0
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on January 23, 2012
at 02:00 PM

If I want a quick broth that is guaranteed full of gelatin, I go with chicken or turkey. Throw in the bones and the skin. I can take a hammer to the bones too to speed up the process easily.

Beef bones seem to take an awful lot longer to get the full nutrition out of and/or they are harder to break apart to speed up the process.

I'm a big fan of pork bones. Mostly because my butt supplier (pork that is- grin) gives me big bags full of fresh bones for free. I've never made a pork broth that didn't turn to jelly in the fridge!

0
319cdfcd8ec0467f34a3c5aeb2a5e045

on January 23, 2012
at 01:54 PM

I personally like both- just for different things. Chicken broth is my all purpose one for recipes quick soups. It goes with nearly anything. I like a quick cup of chicken broth sometimes as a snack or a way to warm up. Turkey fits here, too

However a big pot of beef soup is so good with cabbage, green beans, etc- it more of a meal soup instead of a snack or a side dish.

I'd like to make fish stock some day but have to wait until hubs is out of town long enough to make it and then clear a away the smell!

0
244e1f82efb3fd15d2da39397488fb24

(549)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:01 PM

Right. I hear that if you include skin and cartilage and fat/meat on the bones, the broth tastes waaaaay better. Not so much with the bone marrow, I hear. I personally don't have experience, but I'm really interested and I've been asking my local organic free-range, grass-fed farmers for bones.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:06 PM

People are gonna give you heck about this, so here's a tip. If you want to add more info, or say something more, you should edit your original answer instead of adding another answer. I would delete this one, and edit the original to say what you want it to say.

244e1f82efb3fd15d2da39397488fb24

(549)

on November 28, 2011
at 07:06 PM

Yeah, I actually thought I deleted my last comment already. I just did. I sometimes post when I'm excited and then delete because it's just too dumb.

0
244e1f82efb3fd15d2da39397488fb24

(549)

on November 28, 2011
at 06:00 PM

AWWW, YEAH!! This is something I want to know, too!! Common, guys, fight fight fight!

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