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bone broth and loose stools/cramps?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 13, 2013 at 1:40 PM

Hi, I have starting drinking about 2-3 cups bone broth per day to help with my IBS. I don't drink the fat layer that forms on top (I'll use that later to cook veggies), just the gelatinous stuff. My stools have been looser lately, and my gut a lot crampier. There could be many reasons for the shift - my colon is anything but predictable - but I'm wondering if the bone broth could be a factor. I know that eating way too much fat can cause the same results, but I figure the broth itself can't be all that fatty, is it?

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on February 13, 2013
at 05:50 PM

I have been looking at the low tyramine diets- and there are a lot of tyramines in fermented foods. For meat products (including bone broth I would assume) the key seems to be eat them fresh. Tyramine builds up if the meat is aged or if it stays as left overs in the fridge. I started working out and got sensitive enough to start changing my diet spontaneously. Then I noticed this low tyramine diet thing and how it fits in with what I am doing now.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on February 13, 2013
at 04:26 PM

This is very helpful. I feel like every food touted to help heal the gut - fermented foods, bone broth - only gives my gut more problems...

  • F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

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5 Answers

1
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 24, 2013
at 09:04 PM

If you aren't super strict with your food handling in regards to temperature it is pretty easy to turn a pot of broth into a big petri dish and end up with food poisoning, or at least enough nasty bacteria to make your belly grumble.

When cooking it, you don't need to, and shouldn't let it go to full rolling boil, but it does need to simmer hot enough that a bubble or two is coming to the surface every few seconds. If it does go a while at a low temp, just pop it up to real boil for a few minutes.

Then on the cooling side (and I think this is where people get into trouble) if you are cooling it in the refrigerator, use a shallow baking dish, with the liquid no deeper than 2 inches. You can alternately pop it straight into the freezer, or add a bunch of ice and stir it until melted, then put that in the fridge in whatever size container you want.

Play safe out there kids.

0
4f6d3725feca09ff49e4997f2d2d026b

on February 13, 2013
at 04:09 PM

Its called Steatorrhea

Basically no natural food contains liquid fat. Try eating bone brouth with a solid like meat.

0
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on February 13, 2013
at 03:37 PM

Yes, this happens. You might be able to find some old threads if you search hard enough.
Here is what you will find- person A says, "Broth seems to give me the runs." Person B says, " This is some sort of die off, keep taking the broth and your gut will heal up and the runs will stop." Since I happen to be a Person A sort of person, the subsequent reality is that we get tired of this and just supplement with a little gelatin every now and then and stop fooling with bone broth- except every once in a blue moon, and then we get reminded of why we aren't making it every week.

So, I bought a big old bag of gelatin, which will probably last me the rest of my life, and I put a tablespoon in some ginger tea at night, when I have the tea. I don't know if it is enough to help, but it doesn't cause the aforementioned inconvenience.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on February 13, 2013
at 05:50 PM

I have been looking at the low tyramine diets- and there are a lot of tyramines in fermented foods. For meat products (including bone broth I would assume) the key seems to be eat them fresh. Tyramine builds up if the meat is aged or if it stays as left overs in the fridge. I started working out and got sensitive enough to start changing my diet spontaneously. Then I noticed this low tyramine diet thing and how it fits in with what I am doing now.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on February 13, 2013
at 04:26 PM

This is very helpful. I feel like every food touted to help heal the gut - fermented foods, bone broth - only gives my gut more problems...

0
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on February 13, 2013
at 02:08 PM

My first thought after reading the title was that drinking the fat cold have been an issue, however clearly this isn't the case! It is possible that there is substantial fat in the broth - if the heat is at a certain level the fat could emulsify/be distributed throughout the broth. The stock would've had to have been on at somethings like a rolling boil though. If it was cloudy afterwards and not a lot of fat rose to the top then this might be a telltale sight. I don't know how muuch you'd get in 2 or 3 cups though.

It is possible, but could well be a red herring. Hope you come to feel/get more well...

0
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on February 13, 2013
at 02:00 PM

if the broth is the only knew food you've added, it could be from that.

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