1

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bone broth and layer of fat on top

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 20, 2012 at 12:51 PM

I usually make my bone broth from grassfed bones from Whole Foods. Last time they didnt have any grassfed bones, so I just picked up normal ones, also from WFs.

When I use the grassfed bones, I keep the layer of fat that forms on top. Sometimes I skim it off and use it to fry veggies. I figure this fat must be good since it comes from a good source.

Should I throw away the fat from these non-grassfed bones? Safe to eat? Too much Omega-6?

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:16 PM

Yes, ma'am! I do remember that and they tasted sooooo much better before the vegetarians won.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:01 PM

Don't know how old you are, MathGirl (born in '72, maybe?), but when I was a kid, McDonald's used to fry their fries in tallow. They switched to crap vegetable oils after the vegetarians threw a fit, sometime in the 80s, I think. Tallow takes some getting used to, I think. I think it's a nicer flavor if you add a little salt to whatever you're cooking in it. All I know is, my housemates, who are SAD-eaters all the way and generally terrified of saturated fat, *swoon* over the smell when I cook stuff in tallow.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:46 PM

My head is hanging in shame...

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:34 PM

KEEP THE FAT!! Especially if it's from beef bones. That is beef tallow -- soooo delicious, and darn near impossible to buy, even at most farms. You pretty much *have to* make it yourself as a byproduct of stock. Excellent for frying eggs, veg, and potatoes (if you do potatoes). Not so great for eating in cold leftovers though, since it hardens when cold. (I eat a ton of cold leftovers...don't like using the microwave at work so almost all my lunches are cold.) I store it in a container in the freezer and it basically lasts forever without going bad.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:48 PM

I will definitely try it the next time I make broth. Waste not, want not!

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:43 PM

Honestly I find it tastes kind of scummy. It just has a bleh taste. It seems I am the only one, haha.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:31 PM

What! Heathen! That fat "cream layer" is so delicious.

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:11 PM

oh man the coveted fat, you can send it on over here lol. Someone from PH is gonna bring me fat from trimmed meat so I can render it, I am so excited lol. In one of my broth's I used thyme, and the fat absorbed the flavor of thyme, and when I fry veggies I can taste the hints of thyme, its quite delicious!

27bac964edd249667d0fb749daeeb090

(263)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:11 PM

yeah, I skim it off and put the fat flakes in a bowl in the fridge. I'll bits back to my soup or, like i said, fry them in veggies or eggs. I think it tastes great! Of course, I cook my broth with tons of onions and garlic

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4 Answers

2
Cdaf7199895ec3943b2b43f78693c9ef

(45)

on December 13, 2012
at 03:55 AM

Question. Is the fat that is rendered while making broth good to eat? I've always used it, but wonder if it's still good since cooking fat for a long period of time can oxidize it. I've seen some recipes recommend simmering bone broth for several days. I know at a certain point, I can actually smell the rancidity as the broth is simmering. Does anyone have a source that says how long you can simmer each type of broth before the oxidation? I know it's different for each type of meat.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:02 PM

IMO, keep it. Non-grassfed beef is not going to kill you. Eat as well as you can. Sometimes that means you don't eat grassfed.

0
Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

on December 13, 2012
at 12:08 PM

I get grass-fed bones from a farm, but here is how I handle the fat issue. I first roast the bones for about 40 minutes. This cooks the marrow and renders most of the fat from the bones. I save the marrow and fat for consumption, and then make the stock with the roasted bones. When additional fat rises to the surface of the pot, I just skim it off and I don't use that fat, having plenty from the roasting. You can very quickly get any remaining fat out of the pot so when you cook the stock for hours (I do 24-36), the house doesn't smell like the fat, and you aren't worried about consuming rancid fat.

I should say, I don't know that there is anything wrong with fat that has been cooked for 24 hours, but since I am not sure and I don't like the way it makes the house smell, I prefer to only eat the quickly rendered fat. I make bone broth about once a week, so there is no shortage of fat in the house.

0
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:05 PM

Now I feel like a dunderhead. It never occurred to me to keep that layer of fat I take off the top. I am always so focused on getting that fat out of my bone broth because it makes it taste so bad, that I never thought to use it in another application!

27bac964edd249667d0fb749daeeb090

(263)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:11 PM

yeah, I skim it off and put the fat flakes in a bowl in the fridge. I'll bits back to my soup or, like i said, fry them in veggies or eggs. I think it tastes great! Of course, I cook my broth with tons of onions and garlic

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:31 PM

What! Heathen! That fat "cream layer" is so delicious.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:01 PM

Don't know how old you are, MathGirl (born in '72, maybe?), but when I was a kid, McDonald's used to fry their fries in tallow. They switched to crap vegetable oils after the vegetarians threw a fit, sometime in the 80s, I think. Tallow takes some getting used to, I think. I think it's a nicer flavor if you add a little salt to whatever you're cooking in it. All I know is, my housemates, who are SAD-eaters all the way and generally terrified of saturated fat, *swoon* over the smell when I cook stuff in tallow.

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:11 PM

oh man the coveted fat, you can send it on over here lol. Someone from PH is gonna bring me fat from trimmed meat so I can render it, I am so excited lol. In one of my broth's I used thyme, and the fat absorbed the flavor of thyme, and when I fry veggies I can taste the hints of thyme, its quite delicious!

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:48 PM

I will definitely try it the next time I make broth. Waste not, want not!

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:43 PM

Honestly I find it tastes kind of scummy. It just has a bleh taste. It seems I am the only one, haha.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:46 PM

My head is hanging in shame...

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 20, 2012
at 05:16 PM

Yes, ma'am! I do remember that and they tasted sooooo much better before the vegetarians won.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 20, 2012
at 04:34 PM

KEEP THE FAT!! Especially if it's from beef bones. That is beef tallow -- soooo delicious, and darn near impossible to buy, even at most farms. You pretty much *have to* make it yourself as a byproduct of stock. Excellent for frying eggs, veg, and potatoes (if you do potatoes). Not so great for eating in cold leftovers though, since it hardens when cold. (I eat a ton of cold leftovers...don't like using the microwave at work so almost all my lunches are cold.) I store it in a container in the freezer and it basically lasts forever without going bad.

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