2

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Bone broth and anxiety alleviation

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 07, 2012 at 2:43 AM

I suffer from anxiety, and I find that a cup of bone broth (from daylong-simmered beef joint bones) is EXTREMELY relaxing for me. In fact, I would say that it works as well as a prescription anti-anxiety pill like lorazepam for my more acute anxiety.

What is the mechanism that could explain this? Gut-brain stuff? Abdominal neurotransmitters? Or just warm liquid in my belly?

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on October 08, 2012
at 04:03 AM

thx Sarah. p.s. you have a fan and reader here! I also have AI thyroiditis & have enjoyed your blog.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on October 07, 2012
at 05:45 PM

And, for the record, theanine has helped my anxiety quite a bit. I supplement it in the morning and I keep some green tea at work.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on October 07, 2012
at 05:44 PM

GABA can't cross the blood brain barrier, so availability is poor administered orally. You want picamilon for this purpose, it's one of the "designer B vitamins"; a traditional B vitamin (niacin, B3, in this case), coupled with another molecule that lets the whole of the structure penetrate the BBB. After crossing, it is hydrolyzed into simple GABA and niacin molecules, the former of which should cause an anxiolytic response. Sulbutiamine is another popular form of these bound B vitamins that can make it into the brain (B1, thiamine, this time) - it's used more for energy and improving mood.

47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on October 07, 2012
at 06:42 AM

Throw a handful of shitake mushrooms and onions in the broth. My buddy and I got so high on weed and drunk on tequilla then we started eating shitakes out of the bag and it was really sobering us up.

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4 Answers

best answer

1
19485a8f307ec25aa4901e92dae31a90

on October 08, 2012
at 03:46 AM

I agree with the observation. I include a few links to research in this post http://www.sarahwilson.com.au/2012/01/how-to-make-bone-broth-and-why-you-should/

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on October 08, 2012
at 04:03 AM

thx Sarah. p.s. you have a fan and reader here! I also have AI thyroiditis & have enjoyed your blog.

1
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on October 07, 2012
at 04:16 PM

I was starting to have severe anxiety symptoms. I tried taking the amino acid GABA which is supposed to have a calming effect--to no avail. I was almost ready to see my doctor about it, a disaster because all he'd do is throw pills at me. I was having heart palpitations.

One day I realized I was thirsty and I drank and drank. The anxiety went away. I don't think I was dehydrated, but close to it all the time because I've always been bad about fluid intake. I'm making an effort to do better and I feel 100% better.

So I can see why the broth helps you.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on October 07, 2012
at 05:44 PM

GABA can't cross the blood brain barrier, so availability is poor administered orally. You want picamilon for this purpose, it's one of the "designer B vitamins"; a traditional B vitamin (niacin, B3, in this case), coupled with another molecule that lets the whole of the structure penetrate the BBB. After crossing, it is hydrolyzed into simple GABA and niacin molecules, the former of which should cause an anxiolytic response. Sulbutiamine is another popular form of these bound B vitamins that can make it into the brain (B1, thiamine, this time) - it's used more for energy and improving mood.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on October 07, 2012
at 05:45 PM

And, for the record, theanine has helped my anxiety quite a bit. I supplement it in the morning and I keep some green tea at work.

1
0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on October 07, 2012
at 07:14 AM

I'd guess it to be vasodilation from the warm liquid. You can read more about the amino acid content of bone broth here, but I don't think any of the major constituents are anxiolytic.

Does magnesium do the same for you? That may support the vasodilation hypothesis. And actually on second thought, bone broth may contain some magnesium; that could contribute to the effects as well.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 07, 2012
at 06:55 AM

Chronic infection causing insulin resistance causing blood sugar swings which feel like anxiety attacks.

I can't remember details but I know Glycine had something to do with...I think depression.

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