2

votes

Bitterness in bone broth

Answered on September 22, 2016
Created August 23, 2012 at 11:18 PM

The last two times I've made bone broth in my crock pot - one beef, one chicken, I've let the broth cook for several days before eating, and put a splash of cider vinegar in to leach out some of the calcium. However, the broth has always come out with a bitter undertone, which I don't really care for. Am I just cooking my broth too long, or is there something I can do to prevent this? I'm not putting any aromatics in, just salt and vinegar.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 24, 2012
at 01:55 AM

The easiest way is to dump everything in a crock pot after you're done with dinner, set it on low, and pour it into containers when you get up in the morning. Plus, your house will smell awesome when you wake up!

D9e4b265ef308c8cabf847559fd8be2e

(370)

on August 24, 2012
at 12:39 AM

Is the crock pot covered during the cooking process? Is the final liquid volume significantly less than the starting volume?

20bff9cbbddf521bac87b434981502c3

(275)

on August 24, 2012
at 12:28 AM

sounds like it may have needed to reduce more. also try mixing up the source -- I find that stock with carcasses that have been roasted/rotisseried are much richer than stock with, say, 5lbs of fresh chicken necks.

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8 Answers

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2
20bff9cbbddf521bac87b434981502c3

on August 24, 2012
at 12:26 AM

Sounds like your two problems are:

  • Too long (should be more like 8-12 hours if cooking in stockpot on oven)
  • Salt and vinegar (because you are reducing/concentrating flavors, the salt and vinegar will overpower it)

A third issue may be cooking in the crockpot. I tried that once and the broth ended up meh.

I make epic chicken broth every Sunday. I start it in a large stock pot in the AM and let it sit for about 8-10 hours on very low heat with a little simmering bubble popping up now and then. I use the bones from about 3 carcasses, cover it completely with water (but not too much), bay leaves, peppercorns then go about my day.

The result is fabulous, and after 24h cooling in the fridge it results in a solid gelatinous mass of tasty collagenous mineral-rich goo.

No vinegar required. Add salt when you're heating the broth back up for soup, to drink, etc. Then you can add to taste.

You may want to fish out and break the bones a few hours into cooking if you're concerned about the marrow not leaking out. I've never needed to do that, though.

2
94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on August 24, 2012
at 07:52 PM

I wrote up some comments about making broth that's not bitter here. You may want to scroll up and down that thread to see some answers and techniques.

2
D9e4b265ef308c8cabf847559fd8be2e

on August 23, 2012
at 11:58 PM

Cooking for "several days" might be a bit excessive. If you are not using an aluminum pot, parsley leaves, onion skins, or tomato, I would say it's probably from overcooking. Is there much meat on the bones?

Try 12 - 16 hrs. (I use a pressure cooker: 2-3 hrs!!). Once the bones are removed and the stock has completely chilled and set, you can see how stiff it is. If you want to concentrate it further, let it gently boil uncovered on the stove to reduce the water volume.

Sa??de

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 24, 2012
at 01:55 AM

The easiest way is to dump everything in a crock pot after you're done with dinner, set it on low, and pour it into containers when you get up in the morning. Plus, your house will smell awesome when you wake up!

1
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 24, 2012
at 06:55 AM

Homemade almond milk has plenty of calcium (As much as cows milk, and it is low in fat in general, let alone omega-6s)

IDK whats up with ur broth.

I make stock just using 1 chicken carcass, with a little meat, and one mutton bone left over from a roast. I only simmer it for about 3 hours. Other than the bones, with a little meat, I add nothing. The resulting stock is very gelatinous, and works brilliantly/tastes beutiful in the stews I cook with it. One day I might try using it in a soup too.

I guess maybe I am not leeching out all these minerals people speak of by cooking for 3 hours? But theres definately plenty of gelatin, and my diet is pretty mineral rich anyway (i eat dark leafies, nuts and almond milk, as well as a bit of cheese, added table salt and some fruit).

1
45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on August 24, 2012
at 01:25 AM

It's probably the length of time. Chicken broth can be done much more quickly. The bones are softer and more porous than beef, for example. Try 24 to 36 hours, even less would be effective. You'll still get the calcium you're looking for.

1
1133603ea602c6824da56e8b596c9754

on August 24, 2012
at 12:10 AM

How much vinegar are you adding? I find that if I add more than a teaspoon, I don't like the broth. But, it's also very possible that you are cooking it too long. I do the crockpot for 14-18 hours. I know some that do 24 hours, but not days.

1
81348acb7b886e2b32ca915d250268f3

(1022)

on August 24, 2012
at 12:07 AM

I've only tried making bone broth once, and found it incredibly bland, so now I just treat it as if I'm making any other soup. I like my soups REALLY spicy, so I throw in lots of chilli, peppers, garlic, onion celery, carrot and whatever else I can find. I'm not sure how 'paleo' stock cubes are but I use a lot of them, also there is this stuff called Vegeta which is reasonably salty but also the key to making an awesome soup. http://www.vegeta.com.au/products

20bff9cbbddf521bac87b434981502c3

(275)

on August 24, 2012
at 12:28 AM

sounds like it may have needed to reduce more. also try mixing up the source -- I find that stock with carcasses that have been roasted/rotisseried are much richer than stock with, say, 5lbs of fresh chicken necks.

0
Medium avatar

(3213)

on September 22, 2016
at 08:26 PM

I have found that blanching the bones in boiling water for 20 minutes before roasting and simmering, takes care of the bitterness and funkyness.  

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