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Another Bone Broth Question: What Exactly RU Drinking? The Broth or the Soup?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 09, 2011 at 4:14 AM

What are people drinking? The bone broth itself? Or the soup you made with the broth?

If you're drinking the actual broth, that would be fairly concentrated in terms of fat and cartillage, depending on whether you used marrow or small bones. If I were to do that, I would first have to crack and melt the ice-like fat layer at the top. But this does not taste good, since it's all fat and satiety immediately kicks in. I can't drink more than a tablespoon or two of this stuff .

I use the broth to make my bone-broth soup. My mix is about 1/5th to 1/8th bone broth (with lots of sliced vegetables and additional items mixed in such as beef cubes, salad shrimps, diced liver, spices, etc.). At that level, it's still very rich but not as concentrated as the actual broth, which to me is too satiating and thus not edible.

What do u think?

EDIT: 6/9/2011: when I prepare my bone-broth, I use heavy marrow bones and small rib and neck bones, and a cup of vinegar. Upon boiling, all the marrows come right out. I use a fork and knife to detach any cartillage or tendons from the rib and neck bones. I boil for 2-3 days. In that span, the water evaporates, so I end up actually replenishing the water 3-4 times. I throw away the marrow bones but keep the smaller bones for the next time.

The resulting broth is thus "concentrated" and was made from 3-4 times the actual water poured in. Now, that's the broth. Then I cook my soup and add the broth. I never drink the broth itself since it's just too unappetizing and filling. If anyone still has a problem porking out while Paleoing, just drink a tablespoon of this "concentrated broth". Trust me, you won't eat anything the rest of the day. I can't think of anything that will control your appetite as well as this ... oh yeah, those redskin Spanish style peanuts from Planters ... but they're legumes. Maybe you can cure leptin resistance with this.

Related question: what's going on here? Is the bone-broth fat somehow flatlining insulin? Is it the fat or the protein?

166f449979d83186bd876e8f466d0a69

(1317)

on June 10, 2011
at 03:07 AM

Gotcha! That makes more sense. Sorry, I was thinking "broth" was somehow equivalent to "stock" in British English and had this vision of everything being boiled up together.

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on June 09, 2011
at 11:26 PM

What a lucky boy Ashley! Namby- That will just melt down when you reheat it. I just give the jar (what I normally keep it in) a good shake to break it up and disperse it a bit.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on June 09, 2011
at 03:20 PM

yeah. My chicken broth has cafo feet in it. Usually my beef bones are Grassfed but I prefer just eating the marrow out of them roasted. HAHAHA

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on June 09, 2011
at 02:33 PM

I think the crust is coming from the marrows of the big marrow bones. Those marrows are just fat, unlike the marrows of the smaller rib and neck bones.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on June 09, 2011
at 02:31 PM

In the fridge, my bone broth forms this thick, white fat crust at the top like thick ice. Below that is the liquid or gellified broth.

1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on June 09, 2011
at 02:29 PM

I skim too because I use animal parts from a local Asian grocer. I have to assume the fat is full of some nasty stuff. If I could find an affordable source of quality animal parts I would probably skip this step.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on June 09, 2011
at 02:19 PM

You don't have to boil it the whole time. It's better to have it on a low simmer. It'll make a less cloudy broth.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on June 09, 2011
at 02:02 PM

I cook cubed beef and liver separately. Then throw them in AFTER the broth is done. Those are the last things I throw in, along with kale, collard greens, and diced garlic which do not require continuous boiling.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on June 09, 2011
at 01:21 PM

Yum. Chicken feet make the most deliciously gelled broth. I have some in my fridge right now. My baby boy loves the meat jello. I just feed it to him on a spoon cold!

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on June 09, 2011
at 01:19 PM

No, I just don't like drinking chicken fat. It's too omega 6-ish. And in the case of Beef broth I think the fat gets nasty tasting when you cook it for 2-3 days which is what the Nourishing Traditions cookbook recommends for beef marrow stock. I guess if I were making a quick stock 4-6 hours I wouldn't skim the fat, but it wouldn't be as nutritious.

Da7dc02f6150d09197a768aff40a11f1

on June 09, 2011
at 11:08 AM

I do the same exact thing!

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on June 09, 2011
at 04:41 AM

I'm curious about the skimming as well- do you use it for cooking?

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on June 09, 2011
at 04:32 AM

What's the reason for skimming the fat? To avoid satiety?

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8 Answers

3
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on June 09, 2011
at 04:18 AM

I always skim the fat off after it has cooled. Other than that, I'm not a big soup person. Especially this time of year so I just scoop out a cup or two of the broth, heat it on the stove and drink it like a tea in a mug. Or I add it to a potroast or veggies for flavor.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on June 09, 2011
at 01:19 PM

No, I just don't like drinking chicken fat. It's too omega 6-ish. And in the case of Beef broth I think the fat gets nasty tasting when you cook it for 2-3 days which is what the Nourishing Traditions cookbook recommends for beef marrow stock. I guess if I were making a quick stock 4-6 hours I wouldn't skim the fat, but it wouldn't be as nutritious.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on June 09, 2011
at 04:32 AM

What's the reason for skimming the fat? To avoid satiety?

Da7dc02f6150d09197a768aff40a11f1

on June 09, 2011
at 11:08 AM

I do the same exact thing!

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on June 09, 2011
at 03:20 PM

yeah. My chicken broth has cafo feet in it. Usually my beef bones are Grassfed but I prefer just eating the marrow out of them roasted. HAHAHA

1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on June 09, 2011
at 02:29 PM

I skim too because I use animal parts from a local Asian grocer. I have to assume the fat is full of some nasty stuff. If I could find an affordable source of quality animal parts I would probably skip this step.

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on June 09, 2011
at 04:41 AM

I'm curious about the skimming as well- do you use it for cooking?

2
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on June 09, 2011
at 01:52 PM

Eating hot broth is more of a winter thing for me, though I think it is a good idea to keep it around and use it as a beverage and something to chase down any supplements.

In my experience, freshly made bone broth only keeps a few days in the fridge. I freeze it in one quart portions, and also bought these so I can freeze it in smaller portions.

Recently I made about 2 quarts of soup with chicken bone broth and mirepoix (carrots, celery and onions), and I used this as the basis for several lunches. Warm up the soup and add whatever leftover meat I have laying around, leafy green vegetables, or beaten eggs.

I do get tired of this easily since I'm not much of a soup person.

In the winter my kids will drink the broth as their beverage with dinner. Can't imagine anything more nutritious.

2
2c8c421cf0e0c462654c7dc37f8b9711

(2729)

on June 09, 2011
at 09:03 AM

I skim off the fat and use it for cooking, then warm up a glass of broth and drink it. Trying to get into the habit of drinking it several times a day. I mix in my fermented cod liver oil, butter oil, vitamin D drops, and iodine drops in my AM cup of broth. Good way to choke down fclo. A good way to sneak in some extra broth is adding a couple scoops of chicken broth gel to chicken salad or egg salad.

2
23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on June 09, 2011
at 04:35 AM

I'm not sure what you mean about cracking and melting...... I keep a 2 gal ag in the freezer to put leftover chicken carcasses and bones, skin that didn't get eaten and drippings that didn't get used. I also keep another bag for veggie scraps that don't go to the animals- carrot ends, celery, onion ends and skins, mushroom stems, etc. When the bags get full, or near full, I make a pig pot of stock, usually I add chicken feet and always i add avc to help draw out the minerals. I freeze what I won't use right away. I never skim the fat. i drink a cup at a time, sometimes adding miso. Sometimes I poach eggs in it and eat it as a soup for breakfast. I also eat it in soup but I don't add any other liquid usually- unless for some reason I'm adding tomatoes or cream. I find it delicious and very very palatable. I do this with other bones as well, even beef marrow bones. I don't think it would be concentrated unless you cooked it down quite a bit. I'd call it nutrient dense....

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on June 09, 2011
at 02:33 PM

I think the crust is coming from the marrows of the big marrow bones. Those marrows are just fat, unlike the marrows of the smaller rib and neck bones.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on June 09, 2011
at 02:31 PM

In the fridge, my bone broth forms this thick, white fat crust at the top like thick ice. Below that is the liquid or gellified broth.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on June 09, 2011
at 01:21 PM

Yum. Chicken feet make the most deliciously gelled broth. I have some in my fridge right now. My baby boy loves the meat jello. I just feed it to him on a spoon cold!

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on June 09, 2011
at 11:26 PM

What a lucky boy Ashley! Namby- That will just melt down when you reheat it. I just give the jar (what I normally keep it in) a good shake to break it up and disperse it a bit.

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on June 15, 2011
at 09:23 PM

I usually roast chickens with garlic and rosemary, something like once a week, once they're done, chop'em up and strip the meat off, which goes into that day's lunch, and the rest into a pyrex container to be used later.

The bones then, I boil for a few hours on and off - (maybe 4hrs) until the water gets really cloudy and the bones get brittle enough to break with a fork. It's done when the cartilage in the breast melts or almost melts - I want that gelatin in the stock.

I've actually DRANK the broth cold from the fridge and it tasted good to me. A bit savory, with a hint of fat, but doesn't taste greasy, and there's no solidified fat to skim off the top. It's not just for cold days, and can be quite refreshing by itself. Maybe add some lemon juice or something.

Not too worried about the n6 in the meat that I removed from the carcass - if I have roast chicken for lunch, I'll do salmon of the same size portion for dinner, or vice versa.

Mind you, these are organic/pastured ones, not CAFO abomination chickens.

1
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 09, 2011
at 12:58 PM

i skim the off the fat as much as possible. I tend to keep mine in the fridge for about one week, chipping away at it daily and I have found that the fat slowly degrades the pleasant lightness of the broth otherwise.

I used to use that bone stock to make us soup every night by just adding some water, salt, and pepper and heating it up but now I just keep it in the fridge like a drink and just have a big gulp as often as I remember - usually with lunch and dinner.

I have thought about making my post-workout whey shake with it, but i must admit it'd be more for the shock value in the changing room in the gym than any real health-benefit:)

1
166f449979d83186bd876e8f466d0a69

(1317)

on June 09, 2011
at 12:34 PM

I tend to skim the fat because it rises to the top and as you've said seems to sort of 'ruin' the flavour. I also make chicken broth rather than any other kind and frankly chicken fat is not that appealing to me (unless attached to meat!). In beef stock it might be nice but the fat coats your mouth and then you can't taste it- and as you said, makes you full! I'd skim and use it for other cooking purposes and enjoy the liquid broth. Adding liver sounds a bit crazy too to be honest- why not just eat liver rather than boil it and then throw it away...??

166f449979d83186bd876e8f466d0a69

(1317)

on June 10, 2011
at 03:07 AM

Gotcha! That makes more sense. Sorry, I was thinking "broth" was somehow equivalent to "stock" in British English and had this vision of everything being boiled up together.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on June 09, 2011
at 02:02 PM

I cook cubed beef and liver separately. Then throw them in AFTER the broth is done. Those are the last things I throw in, along with kale, collard greens, and diced garlic which do not require continuous boiling.

1
34a367e60db77270bd7096dc04270fdc

(4171)

on June 09, 2011
at 12:27 PM

My husband smokes a couple of chickens on the big green egg with applewood most weekends. Then I boil the carcasses with some veggies and simmer for a couple of hours. Then I scoop everything out of the broth, put leftover chicken back in and fresh vegetables and we have a ton of soup to eat for almost a week. I don't know if chicken broth is as good nutritionally as beef but it's delicious.

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