2

votes

What affects your rate of metabolism? What is it supposed to be?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 13, 2011 at 8:00 PM

Based on a few factors, it's seems I've always had a 'fast' metabolism. My mother certainly told me so growing up because of my activity level and large appetite. What affects the body's metabolism rate? Are there any benchmarks of what it should be? Or how to adjust it?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 14, 2011
at 01:34 PM

I'm sure MCTs can be stored as fat, but think they get converted to LCTs first.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on October 14, 2011
at 06:31 AM

Do MCTs get stored as fat? I thought they're burned directly as fuel

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 14, 2011
at 03:07 AM

dietary fats are always stored before they are burned. The cunningham model is more accurate and that is rmr=500+22xlean body mass in KG

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 14, 2011
at 02:46 AM

As I understand it, high blood glucose pushes the fatty acids in the bloodstream into adipose storage. Thanks for the technical correction cliff. Regarding the original question, do you have a BMR model you prefer over Harris Benedict?

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 14, 2011
at 02:36 AM

fat instantly gets stored as fat.... according to studies carbs rarely turn into fat and usually only with massive carb overfeeds.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on October 14, 2011
at 02:32 AM

anything that affects energy efficiency in biochemistry can slow your metabolism. The list is vast.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 13, 2011
at 08:25 PM

thanks, CarbSane. While I'm active, I'm also introverted, so I don't mind sitting quietly. ;-) in all seriousness though, Paleo is making me leaner, and helping to regulate my energy - it used to fluctuate a lot - but I still find myself eating a lot, and finding fasting challenging.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

4 Answers

4
Medium avatar

on October 13, 2011
at 10:11 PM

TDEE (total daily energy expenditure) consists of BMR (basal metabolic rate), which is about 80% accounted for by LBM (lean body mass) and accounts for about 60% of TDEE if you're completely sedentary; TEF (thermic effect of food) which is around 10% of TDEE, but could be more if you eat mostly protein, and AT (activity thermogenesis) which is highly variable. The last bit we obviously have a great deal more control over. There's volitional exercise which is important, but NEAT (non-exercise activity thermogenesis) which is the sum total of all the random things you actively engage in throughout the day (i.e. not sitting, laying down). The latter part can add up to huge amounts of energy.

2
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on October 13, 2011
at 08:21 PM

Hi Caleb,

Your basal metabolic rate seems to be somewhat hard-wired. Not much you can do to change it with diet. However since BMR is highly correlated to lean mass, adding muscle would increase it. One can mess up their metabolism with prolonged and frequent dieting (aka calorie restriction which is what folks are doing if they lose weight) and there doesn't seem to be much one can do about the downregulation.

Now total energy expenditure? I don't know ... for the hypo-metabolic, deliberate activity can certainly help. You? Don't know if you could force sitting quietly as much as possible. I'm thinking not.

Thyroid and leptin seem to directly effect metabolic rate (and I've recently discovered some evidence that ASP does as well). Again, most of the changes in that department are beyond control (e.g. acquired thyroid condition).

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 13, 2011
at 08:25 PM

thanks, CarbSane. While I'm active, I'm also introverted, so I don't mind sitting quietly. ;-) in all seriousness though, Paleo is making me leaner, and helping to regulate my energy - it used to fluctuate a lot - but I still find myself eating a lot, and finding fasting challenging.

1
6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18

(1689)

on October 14, 2011
at 01:50 AM

Sucrose increases metabolic rate in rats 64) and humans 65), possibly 5% (24 hour) 66) to 30% (6 hours post meal) 67), especially in obese.

Antibiotics in ob/ob and diet-induced obese mice dramatically reduce metabolic syndrome (including fatness), despite large increases in food intake

Methionine choline-deficient (NASH-inducing) diets in rats who are fed 67% coconut oil consume 143% more calories but don't have greater body mass (and liver disease does not develop). Rats fed MCT have 10% greater daily energy expenditure without increased activity, compared to LCT feeding 44). 23 g MCT per day in humans raises energy expenditure by 5% 45). 6 g/d MCT in overweight diabetics caused a 1.8 cm reduction in waist circumference over 12 weeks, despite a 98 kcal increase in energy 46).

Methionine restriction in rats causes 36% increased chow intake and 150% higher energy expenditure (with less bodyfat %).

36 hours of fasting increases metabolic rate 6%.

Sources @ http://flare8.net/health/doku.php/fructose#benefits http://flare8.net/health/doku.php/misc#coconut_oil http://flare8.net/health/doku.php/nutrients#amino_acids http://flare8.net/health/doku.php/intermittent_fasting

-2
Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 14, 2011
at 02:30 AM

This tool uses the commonly used Harris Benedict equation for BMR:

http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/harris-benedict-equation/

Your metabolism could vary some from this, but probably not more than 10% either way. Activity has a big effect on metabolic rate. Food choices not so much, though food choices affect digestive rate and satiation. If you eat a lot of carbs you load up your bloodstream with glucose. Unless you're active and metabolize it, it will get stored as fat.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 14, 2011
at 01:34 PM

I'm sure MCTs can be stored as fat, but think they get converted to LCTs first.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on October 14, 2011
at 06:31 AM

Do MCTs get stored as fat? I thought they're burned directly as fuel

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 14, 2011
at 02:46 AM

As I understand it, high blood glucose pushes the fatty acids in the bloodstream into adipose storage. Thanks for the technical correction cliff. Regarding the original question, do you have a BMR model you prefer over Harris Benedict?

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 14, 2011
at 02:36 AM

fat instantly gets stored as fat.... according to studies carbs rarely turn into fat and usually only with massive carb overfeeds.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 14, 2011
at 03:07 AM

dietary fats are always stored before they are burned. The cunningham model is more accurate and that is rmr=500+22xlean body mass in KG

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!